Presiding Spirit

By

At Home in the Hills, Back Issues, Departments, Summer 2012

June 19, 2012

Julia and her son Adam, now 14, have become community celebrities: she with her studio exhibitions each November and Adam with a budding film career.

Gilmore_2901

Julia Gilmore’s eclectic decor reflects her artistic passions

The installation of a farm sink in the kitchen led to a wholesale redesign for the room, including new light fi xtures – a teardrop chandelier and a retro industrial lamp above the counter. Photo By Pam Purves.

The installation of a farm sink in the kitchen led to a wholesale redesign for the room, including new light fixtures – a teardrop chandelier and a retro industrial lamp above the counter. Photo By Pam Purves.

Home is important to us all. To an artist, for whom every glance is an opportunity to find beauty, home is more than a place to raise family and feel secure, it is also an inspiration. For Inglewood painter Julia Gilmore, home needed to be a practical place that provided her son Adam with a nearby school, friends and activities, but also provided her with quiet, beauty and space.

After obtaining a degree in fine arts,  Julia spent several years in Montreal and Toronto playing in a band and pursuing a successful recording career. It was after Adam was born that she turned again to painting, developing a distinctive style she called “nap paintings,” small, brilliantly hued paintings on dark backgrounds, executed quickly with a palette knife in the two or three hours her son was asleep. At the same time, she felt a longing to bring him up in the same small-town atmosphere she had experienced as a child.

Her first move in the mid-1990s was to rent a farm in Caledon East that she and her partner could use as a base while they looked for something permanent. Inglewood enchanted her almost immediately. “It reminded me of Mayberry. The Christmas lights were up. The fire hall bell was ringing. I loved it.”

A stucco house for sale on the main street especially caught her eye. With its original early 20th-century mouldings, light fixtures and woodwork, it was perfect – except for the price. So the couple carried on, looking at scores of houses, but finding nothing to equal their first love. Eventually they came back to it, put in an offer they could afford, and hoped. Their hopes were rewarded.

Julia Gilmore is featured as our Artist in Residence for the Summer 2012 issue. Photo By Pam Purves.

Julia Gilmore is featured as our Artist in Residence for the Summer 2012 issue. Photo By Pam Purves.

Julia is the presiding spirit of the place. A woman of great enthusiasm and a vivid presence in any room, she has created a space that exactly reflects her character. Echoing her strong attachment to nature, Julia has painted every room a bright spring-leaf green – a colour that brightens and softens as the light moves and changes through the days and the seasons. “Green is the colour of life,” she says.

As she set to work on the place, Julia discovered windows that had been boarded over. She opened them up, so light now flows into two sides of every main floor room. Enhancing the natural light are sparkling chandeliers in the dining and kitchen areas. A long rope of small lights encircles an interior window that opens to her studio in the glassed-in sun porch. It was added off the kitchen in the 1920s and provides an ideal environment for painting, with a little separation from other household activities.

Julia’s giddy and gorgeous paintings of flowers grace many of the walls. On others hang her quirky interpretations of heritage objects (gas pumps, coffee cans, Chinese take-out boxes), each conceived with such charm that the whole effect is both gracious and whimsical – the kind of images that make you want to smile, even laugh, with delight.

Out of her deep fondness and respect for the past, Julia preserved as many of the home’s original details as she could, including baseboards, door knobs and round light switches. The light fixtures in the upper and lower halls are original etched glass; the duct covers are filigreed iron. The studio has a dark wood ceiling and original floral linoleum. In the upstairs bedrooms, large pieces of linoleum also remain. So too do the bevelled windows in the front door and the ruby glass above it, and the generous bay window in the living room. The century-old flawed glass in the windows scatters the light to Julia’s delight, although she admits the old storms are “a pain in the ass” to remove in the summer.

The only significant change she made was in the kitchen. After rediscovering the sealed windows, Julia took a hard look at the newly bright room and decided an old-fashioned farm sink was needed.

Julia and Brian punched two new windows along the stairs which bring welcome, all-day light to a previously dark space. Photo By Pam Purves.

Julia and Brian punched two new windows along the stairs which bring welcome, all-day light to a previously dark space. Photo By Pam Purves.

Anyone who has renovated can relate to how one small change can lead to a wholesale rethink. Working with her neighbour Angela Keehan, who has a design background and good eye, Julia ultimately worked through a complete redesign of the kitchen. Local contractor and carpenter Brian Gregory did the work – in just ten days.

Inspired by the new light and the new look, Julia and Brian punched two new windows along the stairs. Now looking like they have been there forever, the windows bring welcome, all-day light to a previously dark space.

The old-fashioned stucco, called pargeting, that clads the exterior of the house is scored to look like high-quality cinder block or cut stone. A popular surface in the early part of the 20th century, it was cheaper than stone but almost as durable. Traditionally associated with Cotswold cottages, which this house somewhat resembles, the pargeting seems more sophisticated than other modest claddings of its day.

Julia and her son Adam, now 14, have become community celebrities: she with her studio exhibitions each November and Adam with a budding film career. They have added youth, light and energy to a lovely old house and a lovely small community.

Freelance photographer and writer Pam Purves lives in Caledon.

Must Comment

No Comments

  1. Cougar sighting, June 4, 2009. 4th Line and 20 Sideroad, Mono.

    Okay, so check it out, there I was digging a sandbox for the toddlers – finally started after deciding on a cedar classical look, rather than the art deco poplar design I was contemplating – anyhoo, what assaults my ears but the chilling and heart-wrenching scream of an infant deer in distress. It sounded like a tortured lamb. Loud. Then it stopped. I thought to myself, ah well, circle of life. Dig dig dig.

    But I couldn’t bear it – its calling out for help or what sort of person I’d be if I didn’t answer. So off I went in the direction of the unpleasantness.

    Not fifty feet into the field I spied the beast. Tall as an adult deer, the colour of burnt grass, walking nonchalantly into the pines. There had been sightings reported around here, but I really hadn’t believed them. There was no mistaking it though, the fluidity of its motion, the awesome flank.

    I went back and grabbed my machete and a big club of maple, and stalked out to the spot. I checked the clearing past the pines, nothing. Then I saw what I could only deduce was a path made by the cat dragging something. All the grass was bent forward in a swath towards the forest.

    Blood pumping, I skirted the forest, not wanting to confront the puma, yet too exhilarated to stop my investigation. I followed a path I’d made into the woods, just took a couple of steps in and there was the object of the earlier alarm. The bloody little fawn, dismembered, dropped.

    Quickly I indexed what I have researched about cougars and remember the fact that they will defend a fresh kill with deadly force. I retreated to a nearby hilltop and watched for any renewed action, but nothing more occurred. So I went back to get a camera. When I returned the kill was gone.

    Philip Pearce

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Philip Pearce on June 4, 2009 at 3:21 pm

  2. Just received “In The Hills” and began by reading this delightful article on my old High School. However I believe there is a mistake in the caption of the picture of OHS Staff. I believe 1974 is an incorrect date. I attended in 1962 and there were 27 staff members in the yearbook picture. Mr. Cline, Mr. Percy, Mr. Gibson and Miss McPhedran all looked much older in my 1962 picture than they do in your 1974 picture.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Pat Walker on September 16, 2009 at 2:46 pm

    • Thanks for your comment Pat. And thanks for the heads up re: the photo dates. We’ll look into it.

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      admin on September 16, 2009 at 2:54 pm

      • Hi. The date of the staff photo was actually 1947 – just a typo…

        VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
        Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

        Leslie Godfrey on September 16, 2009 at 4:43 pm

  3. Congratulations,Lesley. You have organized a great party. ODSS deserves it. Being a teacher there for 33 years was a treasure. It was always a pleasure to go to work.The comments about Maurice Cline are so true. He was the heart and soul of the school.
    The 1974 date can not be correct since I had been a teacher there for 7 years at that time and you know that I would not have missed the picture.
    Enjoy the celebration. BettyAnnAsher(Kelly)1966-1999

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    BettyAnnAsher on September 16, 2009 at 6:10 pm

    • Pat, Leslie and Betty Ann, thanks for highlighting the typo on the photo caption, which now reads 1947 NOT 1974. Thanks!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      admin on September 16, 2009 at 9:39 pm

  4. Contrary to popular belief Phedie was not as popular as you think. She “played favourites” to the nth degree. Also, if she didn’t like your parents she didn’t like you !! Her “marking” skills sucked! The only students who got good marks in sewing were their garments she “herself sewed” used for demonstration purposes. I could go on and on and on. Personally, I have learned over the years that her home ec skills were not very good at all.

    Cheryl Cronin

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Cheryl Cronin on September 19, 2009 at 8:25 pm

  5. Canada Post has now implemented its safety policy, a program which forces all rural residents to move their mailboxes to locations which, according to Canada Post will ensure the safety of the mail delivery staff.

    It is understood that an “external expert panel employing scientific criteria” was engaged to study this safety issue and submit its recommendations to Canada Post.

    The process clearly failed to consider the difficulties and dangers that the location changes would impose on the aged and handicapped. In fact what has resulted from this well intentioned program is the transfer of danger to the mail recipient who is now required to walk to the new location to retrieve the mail.

    There are 183,000 rural mailboxes across Canada and over the past four years management has received 2400 employee complaints, Canada wide. Of these complaints 40 were health and safety related, but no specifics have been revealed.

    It is unlikely that these imposed changes to mailbox locations will provide the increase in safety for the delivery staff. Accidents are primarily caused by inattention, carelessness, speed and alcohol. No mathematical formula devised by scientific specialists will achieve the degree of safety claimed.

    My mailbox has been in the same location for 5o+ years without incident but, under threat from the authorities that my mail would be held at General Delivery if I failed to relocate it by September 14th. I decided it would be wiser to have it moved than to drive the 28 km to pick up any incoming mail. The cost: $150 plus the post

    This new location is next to a cow pasture and opposite an open field. It is eight feet off of the roadway and about 70 yards east of its original location. In winter the snow plough dumps the snow exactly where the post is now located, the nearest house is about 150 yards to the east.

    I am a handicapped veteran of WW 2 and am unable to walk safely without crutches. To traverse the distance from my home to the new mailbox location along the gravel road is beyond my capability and extremely dangerous, especially in the winter. For that reason I appealed to the president and CEO of Canada Post on three occasions for relief and she responded only to the first of my three e-mails and that letter did not address my appeal.

    Mail delivery service has been exemplary to this point, but this program is transferring to the unprotected customer a level of exposure to accident that exceeds by far that to which the mail delivery persons might be exposed. They deliver in a vehicle with a flashing light on the roof while the customer has no protection in the event of mishap.

    K. Mesure.
    [Submitted by email]

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    admin on September 21, 2009 at 10:57 pm

  6. I read with interest your “Have you seen a cougar” piece. (Volume 16 #3). There is a significant body of science surrounding the current and historical levels of much of Ontario’s wildlife populations and distribution.

    Unfortunately there has been a rush to conclude that the Eastern Cougar has returned to Southern Ontario without one single piece of factual evidence in not less than 100 years to prove it so,regardless of the countless reported sightings.

    I would like to add that the experts in field identification of wildlife from those at the MNR along with hundreds of thousands of skilled hunters and naturalists who spend hundreds of thousands of hours in the field every year have yet to submit a single piece of evidence or sighting record (everyone now carries a digital camera it seems).

    Mr Greg Cull of the MNR would be happy to respond to questions in this regard along with a review of the provinces reintroduction program of the Fisher (porcupine control) and the apparent Black Bear territorial expansion. The bear movements south into Dufferin are not new, but have been witnessed every decade or so for many years. I had the pleasure of tracking one in the 70s in this area and have personal knowledge of others in each decade since.

    It is a wonderfully romantic idea that we might have these awesome cats among us once again, but it is most doubtful!!!!.

    Respectfully submitted,
    Yours truly,
    Rob Best
    President Upper Credit Field Naturalists
    [sent by email]

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    admin on September 22, 2009 at 10:46 pm

  7. The Melancthon Graveyard.

    Should the proposed open pit mining project in this community be authorized, then it is inevitable that depopulation will result. It will become the death knell for Melancthon.

    The pursuit of the almighty dollar in this greed-driven society always takes precedence over the welfare, and human rights, of people and the value of the existing culture.

    Melancthon has been growing top quality crops in its fertile soils, soils that are ideally suited to the production of potatoes. Beneath these fertile soils lies a huge deposit of sandstone that has drawn the attention of those who see its monetary value, but not its importance to the provision of filtered and potable water, water that feeds the wells of the local community. Remove the sandstone and you destroy the community. Municipal water would have to replace the contaminated well water and those left dry by the excavation.

    The cost of the infrastructure needed to provide municipal water to all residents would be astronomical and few in the community would be financially capable of meeting the cost. It follows that, should the unthinkable occur, the Highland group of shareholders should be held responsible for the costs of materials, installation and the labour required to provide the municipal water.

    Those holding shares in this business of tearing apart a community, one that serves the food requirements of many people, are, probably, unwittingly participants [that could be perceived as verging on] a criminal act. Should the final decision eventually be that of the Ontario Municipal Board, then, in all probability, the process of dismantling that community will be approved. OMB always seems to rule in favour of business; it has tunnel vision and focuses, usually, on business and jobs, plus tax revenues rather than the human consequences of the decision.

    Should approval to excavate be received, it is unlikely that more than 120 jobs will be created, and those only for the time required to remove the sandstone. The local farming people will not be the beneficiaries of those jobs because most sold out to Highland because they wished to retire. Most would not have accepted the tempting financial offer from Highland had they been aware of the destruction that was planned. They know once the land is destroyed by what is planned by Highland, it will never recover. They believed the promise that the plan was to build a major world-class potato operation and that convinced them to accept the $8,000 per acre offered.

    The negotiations to purchase the rail and to extend it to locations where deep water can accept shipping capable of transporting the sandstone to distant markets is also rumoured. If true, it would see the sandstone sold to the most lucrative markets, benefiting only the shareholders, not the province or the local people..

    This assault on a spectacular environment and a successful farming area, the habitat of numerous indigenous creatures, and the lives of the local people must be denied by the elected authorities before it becomes too late.

    K.Mesure.
    [Received by email]

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    admin on September 22, 2009 at 10:55 pm

  8. I read your notice regarding sightings of big cats in the Caledon region. We live in the Cedar Mills area just east of Hwy 50 north of Old Church Road. About the middle of August this summer, I was looking for my black lab around our country property.
    I thought I’d found her lying, enjoying the afternoon sunshine about 100 yards away
    from the house so I called her several times noticing that her eyes looked gold in the
    sunlight not their usual black. Moments later my dog came wagging up the path
    behind me and we both were able to stare as a big black cat (about the same
    size as my 70 lb. black lab) stood and stretched and easily leaped over the
    four foot fence that separates my lawn from a field of tall grass. The tail was quite
    long and curled a bit on the end. There is no doubt in my mind that it was a cat.

    My husband called us urgently as he was leaving the house one morning four or
    five years ago to look at a big black cat that he saw in the exact same place
    however it ran into the forest before the rest of us saw the animal. I couldn’t say if
    it was the same cat but his description is identical.

    Finally, I was driving home around 9:00 p.m. down Mt. Hope Road about two years
    later and slowed for a large cat (I don’t know the colour) that I saw crossing the
    road in my headlights. It was pulling a smaller animal across the road and ran
    into the brush as I rolled closer to get a better look.

    My stories are usually met with scepticism or the suggestion that these are
    really just coyotes or dogs but I know that I have see this kind of cat at least
    twice myself and my husband was very sure of his sighting too. Thanks for asking – I hope that helps.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Susan Armstrong on September 23, 2009 at 6:00 pm

    • I live on castlederg sideroad close to mount hope. The sighting I had took place about two years ago. At that time my home had not been built yet. My daughter and I were scouting the property looking for an ideal spot to build the home.It was getting a bit dark but we could still see quite well. As we were about to drive down the hill towards the road,I looked to my left down in the ravine (as I usually do,looking for turkeys and such)I saw a black animal walking towards the small creek. I thought it was a neighbours dog, but when it turned to go back the way it came it looked to me like a large cat. My daughter said “what is it dad?”, I said “oh nothing”.(I didn’t want to scare her)
      I told my wife about it, we later dismissed it as being a dog until I read your story.
      Thank’s for publishing this story, I’m pretty sure now that I did see a large cat just as I thought.

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Ivano Diminutto on November 17, 2009 at 6:20 pm

    • Dec 29th 2012
      Just saw a large jet black cat approximately 65 pounds cross old church road right at highway 50 and run in deep snow up a steep embankment. Had 2 kids in the car and we all saw a very sleek powerful cat, long thick tail and cat like gait. Ran very forcefully up hill not leaping thru snow but powering thru it. Obviously a cat and way too big for a house cat. Beautiful gait . We are about 200 feet away initially but drove towards it as we went up the hill and it ran up the steep embankment on the south east corner of 50 and Old Church.

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Andrew wood from Highway 50 and old church road on December 30, 2012 at 6:10 pm

  9. I will not move my mailbox because I fear for my safety. The new location is at the bottom of a slight hill 250ft south of the original location. The roads in the winter are already more narrow due to the pile up of snow. I will be forced to walk to my mailbox on this narrow icy road and I worry that cars may come speeding over the hill and not see me until the last minute. They may panic, hit the breaks and swerve out of control. Why is Canada post and the Government not concerned about my safety? What has to happen before someone becomes concerned about the publics safety?
    Eleonora Cignini
    Mono Adjala Townline

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Eleonora Cignini on September 25, 2009 at 8:53 am

  10. Hey all!
    It’s a wonderful thing that nature has found it’s way back home!
    In the last year I have seen 2 Fishers, one in a friends barn in Amaranth and one crossing the road in Hillsburgh.
    A friend and I believed that we caught a glimpse of a cougar in our travels along Hwy 89 near Airport Rd. It was standing amongst some tall grass in a grove of trees next to a field full of sheep. As we slowed down on the shoulder, the creature retreated quickly into the bush.
    I personally have noticed alot more wildlife, other than squirrels and birds, popping up in our communities. From bobcats along the 400 to snowy owls perched on light standards, we can rest assured that nature will find a way to work with us, it’s really a question if we can do the same for nature.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Jay Wilson on September 28, 2009 at 11:18 am

  11. We had a bear sighting on our property at [location deleted by request] a month ago. The bear was lying on our driveway eating apples that had dropped from the tree. I do have a photo if you could email me the address to send it to. (Ed. note: the photo is below.) A week later, a neighbor called to say he saw the bear near our home and we also found bear feces on our front walkway. A little too close for comfort when we have 3 small children.
    Bear in Mulmur near Airport Road and 20th Sideroad

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Diane [last name removed by request] on September 29, 2009 at 7:45 pm

  12. Canada Post expects us to move our rural mailbox to the moon. Well, not exactly to the moon, but it may as well be. Our mailbox has been located by our driveway for decades.

    Now, however, Canada Post wants it moved 120 m down the road to a swampy area, frequently besieged by fog, and blowing snow in winter. It is also a favourite spot for cars to run off the road into the ditch. Canada Post is putting us at risk when walking or driving to the mailbox at their proposed site.

    Speaking with officials at Rural Mail Safety Review Customer Service was futile. They would not provide answers to questions about specific criteria considered for chosing their so-called “better” site. The impression is that they don’t know and that their bosses don’t want them to know.

    Our mailbox at its present location is no hazard for the mail carrier and it is safe for us. Canada Post’s protestations to the contrary, the safety issue is not the motive for the measure for relocating our mailbox, but the reduction in the number of rural mailboxes and their eventual elimination likely is!

    It’s only a matter of time before Canada Post puts more services under the chopping block to appease the demands the union workers.

    Michele Zaichuk
    [submitted by email]

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    site admin on October 1, 2009 at 6:20 pm

  13. It was wonderful to read the article about this amazing school, rich in history thanks to many who walked it’s halls. For many of small town and rural kids, the expanse of the school was beyond belief and one inevitably had a class in the 800 hall followed by one at the furtherst end of the 100.
    I was so happy to see comments by many of the teachers who really did have an impact on my life and engrained the seeds of curiosity and strength to challenge and question. In particular, the dynamic art duo of Mr. Godfrey & Mr. Cook…I’m still painting and creating. Mr. Gravelle’s English classes definitely made me look at different genres with new eyes and Mr. Babcock’s grade 9 history classes in the room above the pool were alway lively.
    Thanks to all, both staff and peer, who are the heart of ODSS!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Lori Skimin on October 2, 2009 at 10:31 pm

  14. My home is on 4th line OS Melancthon, and mail delivery has been made without incident to the box opposite the driveway entrance since the house was built, about ten years ago. The road is straight with an 80km speed limit, and is in places narrow and somewhat undulating; a mail carrier pausing for a few seconds is considerably less at risk than a car pulling out of some of the local driveways, or than a pedestrian or cyclist, and the local carrier is not complaining, using due vigilance when pausing.

    Canada Post has dictated that a number of boxes, including mine, be moved, in a number of instances with no obvious advantage to the carrier, and in some cases, such as my own, creating a very dangerous situation for the user. I appealed the decision, and was visited by representatives from Canada Post. They admitted that to walk the 100 yards to the proposed new site would be hazardous and put me at considerable risk because the road is narrow, the speed limit often disregarded, and deep ditches on either side mean there is nowhere for an unprotected walker to go in emergency: the situation is considerably worse when the road is slippery or wet (when I would challenge even Ben Johnson to negotiate the 100 yards fast enough to cover the distance safely ahead of on-coming vehicles).

    It is totally impractical, especially in winter, as well as being environmentally undesirable, to use a car to collect mail, and the Canada Post officials offered, as their only alternative to the box move, a space at a group box in town, or a box in the post office also in town, 4km distant, initially without charge, but involving the added considerable inconvenience of the ensuing change of address.

    The system here has posed no problem, and this would appear to be an indirect step, countrywide, towards eliminating rural mail delivery,and hardly a green alternative.

    Best wishes, Susan Ware
    [received by email]

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    site admin on October 14, 2009 at 1:25 am

  15. It was about 4 years ago now. Thanksgiving weekend. My husband and I had been invited over to Bill Symons house for the family thanksgiving dinner.

    He lives just south of us on the townline road at the top of the hill on the north end of Hockley. His property is glorious with beautiful views and vistas.

    We were standing alone on his balcony, enjoying the valley. It was one of those wonderful sunny, warm, thanksgiving sundays.

    Less than a 100′ from where we were standing I saw a kitty. He looked just like our Jack kitty – orange in colour.

    I said, hey, look it’s a Jack cat……

    My husband says, that’s no Jack cat that’s a cougar.

    This thing was HUGE! What was I thinking.

    He sauntered through Bill’s back yard, along the top of the hill, then headed down to the valley. We were both in such shock, we could barely blurt out…..Bill….Bill…..come quick.

    By the time he showed up of course the mythical cougar had disappeared. Bill has lived there over 30 years and never saw the cougar. We were there less than 30 minutes!

    It was very funny on many accounts as Mark Nelson, had just regaled a story about the myth of the Hockley Cougar. We of course were thinking it was the rantings of an old man, maybe one too many pops!

    Now Mark comes to us and says, tell me the story of the cougar again?

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Christine Thomas on November 3, 2009 at 9:11 pm

  16. I live in Erin Ontario and I have a friend who has seen 2 cougars in the past two weeks,one on the fourth line of Erin walking slowly acroos an open field and then one on the Trans Canada trail behing his property. On the second occasion the the cougar literally jumped out in front of him on the trail, growled and hissed and then disappeared into the bush.
    I, myslef was walking my dogs in Erin fairgrounds last year and came across skat that to me was obviously from a huge cat. There was a pile and this was surrounded by deep claw marks. The skat has been partially covered.

    I think there are cougars in our area and I have noticed small,lowflying planes in the area obviously carrying tracking devices for something.

    Makes one wonder doesnt it??

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    marina cox on November 11, 2009 at 7:46 pm

  17. oh yes and before I forget, I have another friend who rides her bike on the trans canada trail every day and she saw a cougar on the trail right in front of her!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    marina cox on November 11, 2009 at 7:48 pm

  18. Your on-line topics are the conversation of the week in our house. A friend at 8th Line Amaranth & 20th Sideroad came outside during the day to see a cougar stalking her several horses. It was just on the other side of the paddock fence. Perhaps the fact that it is electric fence is what saved the day. I wonder how her 2 dogs and several cats will fare over the coming days. The stallion accross the road from her had rake marks over his shoulders and flanks just over a year ago. A cougar was highly suspected but not seen. Farmers have a fair amount of loss due to the current coyote population but that field of sheep, that Mr. Wilson saw the cougar beside, will soon have damage to it’s residents. Check with the Ministry of Natural Resources about the 2 breeding pairs of cougars which were released into Dufferin county a couple of years ago. It appears they and perhaps their offspring are still around. This was to control the deer population. (NB: they may deny this but it is true). Maybe just an increase in the hunter’s tags would have been sufficient enough.
    A bit of a danger to persons and livestock alike.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Diane Griffith on November 16, 2009 at 7:48 pm

  19. The second topic in our household this week – after the cougar sightings. Our mailbox too was requested to be moved. The reason was that it was not the correct distance from the top of the hill to the south of our driveway. Apparently having something to do with drivers not being able to see the mail delivery car or some such thing. I too am all for our wonderful mail lady being kept safe. She is very nice and we would not like to see her have an accident. I know she is also not the person responsible for the required relocation of the mailbox. Our mailbox is currently at the end of our driveway on the opposite side of the road (beside the southbound lane of traffic). I could see the reason for concern if the hill was to the north of us as someone could come over a hill quickly and hit the mail delivery car which would be in the same lane. Our hill is to the south of the mailbox which is only a problem for oncoming traffic and since there is a solid line down the centre it should not be a problem at all. Oh, did I mention that the other issue for it being moved is that the shoulder of the road is not large enough for the carriers vehicle to pull over completely on? Since we just had our road completely reconstructed and freshly paved wouldn’t it have been appropriate to have this addressed at that time? And yes, Canada Post knew about it at the time as they removed our mail service to the sorting station off “C” Line (without warning and no indication as to where to pick-up our mail) due to the construction and the fact that all of the mailboxes were pulled out by the road works. Perhaps when Canada Post was driving up and down for 2 or 3 days during this construction they could have indicated where they would have like the mailboxes to be relocated to. Oh. Sorry. Too easy. Now our box is to be still on the other side of the road but approximately 50 feet to the North (not a problem), beside a new driveway our neighbour had put into his field for tractor access. Good thing I hadn’t moved it yet or last week the combine would have completely removed and crushed it. Sag. And we march on!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Diane Griffith on November 16, 2009 at 8:03 pm

  20. Just wanted to say thank you for the lovely article and kind words Jeff Rollings wrote in the winter edition of In The Hills about my daughter Jade Scognamillo in your Local Heroes article. It is an honour for her to be considered a hero – she certainly doesn’t see it that way! I enjoy reading In The Hills every season – keep up the great work! Headwaters is such a wonderful place to live – we feel blessed to have found it when we moved from England!

    Jane Scognamillo

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    site admin on November 19, 2009 at 11:45 am

  21. I loved your article and pictures on the Orangeville Olympians.

    I was surprised that you failed to mention one of Orangeville’s most successful female Olympians, Janine Rankin.

    She went to two Olympics in 1988 and 1992 for gymnastics.

    She has two world-recognized moves on the balance beam that are named after her (Rankin 1 and Rankin 2) and that have never been duplicated.

    She also doesn’t live that far away from Orangeville.

    Sincerely, Robert Abbott

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    site admin on November 19, 2009 at 1:10 pm

  22. [from Charles Hooker, by email]

    The reports of cougar sightings (“We asked and you told us,” Winter 2009) reminded me of the restrictions on endangered species in Ontario.

    The federal Species at Risk Act (SARA, 2004) addressed federal lands and authorized provinces and territories to pass similar legislation. The Ontario Endangered Species Act (ESA, 2008) listed 184 species that are now protected by law in Ontario – vegetation, fish, molluscs, animals, etc.

    Strangely, while the SARA does not list the cougar, the ESA does; so the cougar may be destroyed to protect you and your livestock in Canada, but not in Ontario.

    Has Ontario seceded?

    Charles Hooker

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    site admin on November 19, 2009 at 2:29 pm

  23. [from Karen Hutchinson] Jen and I were truly honoured to be selected as local heroes by In the Hills. I think Jeff Rollings captured everything we said and Pete Paterson is a genius with the camera!

    We are in such good company — there are some incredible people in our community. Thank you for doing the series to help make our community a better place. It is really good way to promote all the causes and issues that so many of us care about. We do know that everybody reads In the Hills because of the comments we hear on different pieces.

    On a personal note – I am sure I am going to take a lot of ribbing from my local girlfriends on being called a “Supperhero.” It will give them a good laugh, but then they will have to talk about the issue.

    Karen Hutchinson

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    site admin on November 19, 2009 at 3:53 pm

  24. [from Deanna Ruple] We just received the winter issue of In the Hills.

    What a great magazine. The information about the local heroes was amazing.

    It is so neat to read about people you sort of know.

    Also the book reviews and just about everything was great.

    We enjoy all the issues but especially this one.

    Thanks,
    Deanna Ruple

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    site admin on November 19, 2009 at 4:02 pm

  25. [from the Niagara Escarpment Commission]

    I am writing to correct the portrayal of the Niagara Escarpment Commission (NEC) published in your story (Homegrown in the Hills: Cider House Rules) in the September issue of your magazine.

    The piece suggests that the applicants for Spirit Tree Estate Cidery and farm market in Caledon were subjected to inordinate regulatory scrutiny by the NEC, local conservation authority and the Town of Caledon.

    In the Commission’s case, the facts speak for themselves:

    * Mr. Tom Wilson submitted an incomplete application with no details or plans to the NEC in 2005. Later that year, he submitted a second application that was conditionally approved by the NEC in April 2006, for a small-scale accessory farm market.

    * The NEC’s decision was appealed to the Environmental Review Tribunal by three abutting property owners and a prospective abutting property purchaser. NEC staff were instrumental in mediating to dismiss the appeal and then participated at the hearing in support of Mr. Wilson, but this process – whose timelines are beyond our control – delayed a final positive decision by six months.

    * In the meantime, Mr. Wilson increased the size of the proposed farm market and added a cidery component, which was not part of the approved application. At the time, cideries were not a permitted activity in rural Caledon, although they were being contemplated as such in an Official Plan Amendment to the Town’s Plan being considered by the Ontario Municipal Board. Niagara Escarpment Plan policies already supported wineries and cideries, subject to municipal policies.

    * Because the application was no longer just for a small farm market but for a larger building and a cidery, an NEC Development Permit could not be issued.

    * Mr. Wilson filed a new application for the larger, more extensive operation but now had to wait for the Town’s Official Plan Amendment to be approved.

    * The NEC definitely did not require Mr. Wilson to plant trees to “hide the apple trees.” The trees were required to provide complementary screening and landscaping associated with a large proposed building and parking lot in a rural area. Outstanding scenery is a feature that characterizes Caledon. Its maintenance is a very important consideration for the NEC when a new land use is introduced.

    I regret that the writer did not contact the NEC while preparing the story because the information that was presented was incomplete and unfairly negative.

    In fact, the NEC did everything in its capacity to allow Mr. Wilson to proceed with his farm market and cidery and encourages compatible agricultural commerce in the Niagara Escarpment Plan area.

    Yours truly,

    Don Scott, Chair

    Niagara Escarpment Commission

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    site admin on November 19, 2009 at 4:05 pm

    • Mr. Scott,

      The fact that a position such as yours exists is in itself an affront to liberty. We live in a time when regulations such as the ones imposed by the NEC are crushing the economic backbone of our Province.

      That you and your commission feel compelled to go so far as to tell private property owners how to landscape their own property tells me all I need to know about the objectives of the commission: you are busybodies who like nothing more than to tell others what to do.

      There will come a time when the people of the province will have had enough of this ridiculous regulation. It’s getting so that you can’t even cut down a tree in your own yard without permission from some regulatory body. How much more can we take?

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Al on October 13, 2010 at 2:02 pm

  26. Our subdivision has a mix of individual mail boxes at properties and community boxes at the end of the street. We fall into the second category.

    It occurred to me,having seen many flags planted around the subdivision (indicating boxes are to be moved), that our ‘community boxes’ placed by the Mail Service/Post office themselves – is actually very close (just a few paces) to the corner of our street.

    There are 3 separate community boxes. Often more than one car pulls in at the same time, with other cars and school buses turning into the road trying to manouver around us. Do you think we should place a ‘moving’ flag, suggesting they bring them in from the corner? Just a thought!

    Alison

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Alison Hird on November 21, 2009 at 8:36 pm

  27. I live in a subdivision at Hockley rd and hwy 10. Yesterday I looked out my back window towards our treeline when I saw a huge cat with a long tail walk past. I grabbed my phone to take a picture and ran out in bare feet, but by the time I got to the spot I saw it, it was gone. I then came to my senses and thought how silly I was. Later I heared there have been similar sightings in the area.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Rebecca Boden on November 23, 2009 at 8:40 am

  28. A note to our readers: At the suggestion of author Michele Green, we have updated “Kind Hearted Cat Herders,” one of our Local Heroes stories, with information about how to help: “Anyone wishing to assist one day a week, donate toward the cost (approx. $200/month) of food, or provide old lawnchair cushions, please contact Jane Helie at jjkhpets@xplornet.com.”

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Tony Maxwell on November 23, 2009 at 11:27 am

  29. What a great read! Lisa, you’re a Writer!! I am sure your musical friends, the subjects of your new article must be surprised and delighted with the insightful reviews of their work. Love your choice of descriptives that really give a verbal picture of the music and the people who make it. Congrats for adding audio! Congrats Li. Keep it up.
    Sister Suzie

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Suzie Noaro on November 24, 2009 at 9:41 am

  30. I used to love the Olympics and found it very moving. But I’ve lost all interest in it, mainly because of the United States’ need to win the most medals, and the use of drugs. It’s impossible for me to believe that most winners aren’t cheating — it’s the ones who can hide their use who don’t get caught. I feel sorry for young athletes who are losing the interest of the public because of this trend.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Gloria Hildebrandt on November 24, 2009 at 6:41 pm

  31. The article that Gary Bonikowsky wrote of his dear daughter Sarah speaks to a father’s love for his daughter. It speaks to values and worth, real worth, and a father’s esteem for the efforts that his Sarah gave with all those others who tried so valiantly, yet seemingly failed to win some Olympic medal.

    I’m quite certain that if all the other parents could write their thoughts of their participating Olympian daughters or sons, perhaps we might find they all shared similar views of their achievements.

    However, the one thing that seems to shine out of this article is the spiritual substance garnered from the whole experience of being at the Olympics in Beijing.

    If spiritual values and the light of understanding can emerge as a leading principle or reason for the entire experience, then this experience of Sarah’s was truly one that bares a profound truth.

    That indeed “all things (and experiences) do work together for good” if we can only see it that way. This requires a heart devoted to seeing only the best in every situation no matter the difficulty or required struggle to overcome. To glean good from everything rather than seeing only what ‘appears to be’, a momentary loss or failure is our challenge and responsibility today.

    Thanks for letting this article into your magazine. Its very uplifting quality is greatly appreciated, and an encouragement to all who read it.

    Wish I had a copy of your magazine to share with others here in Nanaimo,BC. It sounds terrific!

    Thank you for so uplifting a story and sharing.

    David Wick

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    David Wick on December 12, 2009 at 11:08 am

  32. It is well known that the Highland Rail Group’s anticipated rail line through the Town of Orangeville will be used for transporting trains heavy with aggregate product from the Highland Companies’ proposed and unprecedented 2400 acres, 200 foot deep mine in Melancthon Township. Trains will travel through Orangeville south to Toronto and north to Owen Sound where gravel will presumably go on ships and out of Canada and the profits will go to a faceless Boston based hedge fund.

    Orangeville citizens need to carefully consider what an active rail line, with a busy schedule, carrying heavy materials through their streets, many of which are residential, will mean to them as residents and business owners, and not get too excited when local papers claim “Victory” for Orangeville.

    They might also consider that it is not a victory for their friends and neighbours who will live next door to a 2400 acre, 200 foot deep, air polluting, water sucking hole that rocks their world daily with explosives. It is simply one more link in a chain that brings rural Melancthon and the headwaters of Dufferin closer to possible destruction.

    For those who think that this rail line needs to go to Highland Companies proposed, giant, gravel mine in Melancthon, because it must be necessary to supply Ontario’s (Toronto’s) insatiable thirst for gravel, think again. There are 7000 gravel pits in Ontario, and a recent State of the Aggregate Resource in Ontario Study noted that there are enough pits within 75km of Toronto to supply their gravel needs for the next 20 years, and then there are all the other thousands of pits outside of the 75km. Twenty years, without a giant pit in Melancthon, will give the Aggregate Industry adequate time and incentive to revamp how it does business.

    The Toronto Environmental Alliance http://www.torontoenvironment.org strongly encourages the reduction, recycling and reuse of aggregate materials for the greater Toronto area and surrounding municipalities. Ever wondered what happens to giant skyscrapers and enormous bridges that are torn down? That cement can be recycled.

    The Aggregate Industry is one of the most financially and politically powerful industries in the country. Check out http://www.gravelwatchontario.org. It is the ethical duty of the industry to invest in the reduction, recycling and reuse of materials rather than continue to devastate non-renewable farm land.

    Perhaps the rail line will be good for local businesses but, I would like to know what written guarantees municipalities have that the train will even stop; when and how often? Won’t the Highland Companies main focus be to move as much product as quickly as possible through Shelburne and Orangeville to its southern market place and then back to the mine for more?

    Certainly, a rail line might create new jobs by attracting new and powerful industry; perhaps an American based hedge fund will come and destroy thousands of acres of Prime Agricultural land and start a giant aggregate mine! What about small business? I have been told that a local business man, initially excited about the HRG, was disappointed to discover that it would increase his business costs significantly. What written guarantees has Orangeville Council made for fair freight rates, safety measures, and upkeep? It is true that trains are more environmentally friendly than trucks, but if they are loaded with a product that has irrevocably altered the environmental fabric of a neighbouring municipality and poses devastating water issues for a huge chunk of Ontario, then how will that help the environment?

    And what about a passenger car? I am not really interested in taking a scenic ride with my kids on a train loaded down with thousands of tons of heavy rock product. And what possible future variables are associated with this line that might actually end up costing the tax payers millions in the long run? Wasn’t that why the trains were stopped in the first place?

    Five million dollars, such as Orangeville bargained for, doesn’t seem to go very far these days and it makes one wonder whether the corridor property has been vastly under priced. Citizens need to ask all these questions and many more before they encourage their politicians to vote, or work to influence the vote of neighbouring municipalities. It is those municipalities who will pay the ultimate sacrifice and suffer a terrible loss of community.

    Anyone wanting to experience that loss, which is so strongly felt in Melancthon Township already, need only join our bi-monthly council meetings: http://www.melancthontownship.com or attend an open public meeting of the North Dufferin Agricultural and Community Taskforce: http://www.ndact.com. NDACT has filled the Honeywood arena on three occasions in the past year with hundreds of citizens from many parts of Ontario who oppose the negative impact of this mine.

    In a time of climate change, our political leaders must think past the almighty buck to increasing food and water demands, and world famine. We, in Ontario are not immune to these threats. Our children will pay the price for our lack of political will and vision. Prime agricultural land, like the exceptional Honeywood Silt Loam Soil that lies directly in the path of the proposed Highland mine will be desperately needed and must be protected. Its unique structure and draining ability allows for good food production even during climatic challenges. Even if you are a ‘nay sayer’ of climate change, it is a documented fact that our agricultural land is continuing to disappear at an alarming rate while demands for food supply continue to rapidly increase.

    Highland Companies’ claims that they will farm (something) 200 feet deep in the mined land seem unrealistic; even a representative from the Aggregate Lobbyist Association (Ontario Sand, Stone and Gravel) has said that “yes” a lake is considered acceptable rehabilitation in lieu of agricultural. Some surrounding farmers are convinced that their farm land will suffer and may even be lost, as huge amounts of water give over to gravity and drain into the 200 foot depth of the Highland mine making food production improbable.

    Water, our most precious resource must be our first concern. Over one million Ontario residents depend on the water which flows from the Headwaters now mapped and proposed to be heavily and deeply excavated by Highland Companies. The Source Water Protection Act of this Province dictates that “activities that are or would be a significant drinking water threat either cease to be or never become a significant drinking water threat”, and the same Act “provides Municipalities with additional authorities to regulate any activity that is a significant drinking water threat”.

    Our politicians must pay close attention to this Act and lean on it to insure the protection of the Dufferin Headwaters for all of Ontario. If not, County tax payers might find themselves paying in perpetuity to maintain the giant pumps (proposed by the proponent) to control the headwaters long after the Highland Company has finished mining Melancthon.

    All of County Council, including Orangeville, must research the Highland Companies plans with great diligence and get expert advice from unbiased planners, engineers, and environmental experts, before they attempt to influence surrounding Municipalities to cast their vote for this rail line. It is sensible to assume that the rail line is contingent on the success of the Aggregate Application, and in turn one might assume that the successful bid to lay track may influence the success of that application.

    No one in the County of Dufferin should be wishing this mine upon their friends in Melancthon. Here, citizens have already suffered loss of homes and health playing host to 120 wind turbines, and now we have been devastated by the loss and/or destruction of nearly 20 homesteads, thousands of trees, wildlife, and severe erosion of precious agricultural land, not to mention the erosion of our tax base as Highland Companies’ continue to ‘do business.’ All this, and an aggregate application has yet to be submitted!

    I may be saddened by the judgment that allows Orangeville a vote on this matter of the rail line, but I do not necessarily disagree with it. However, my consensus on this is contingent “not on the colour of their money, but on the content of their character”. That content must include intelligence, a vision for the future, ethics beyond reproach, and above all else – backbone.

    Should we worry about the character of these County politicians? Well, Orangeville reps did fail to have the foresight to consider ALL of the citizens of Dufferin County when they struck this financial agreement with the HRG in the first place. Not only did they fail to recognize that they had County responsibilities to consider, but they also failed to recognize that they were in the driver’s seat. They could have made that deal and kept all their citizens happy by taking the wheel and setting the terms. Since the Highland Rail Group had an extra $2 million to spend, the deal should have been $7million-not $5 million. And it should have been made very clear, that if HRG ever asked Orangeville Politicians to influence the vote of neighbouring municipalities (who are, after all, their County charges and friends) again – the deal was off! But, that didn’t happen. Yeah. We should all be worried.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Marni Walsh on February 15, 2010 at 9:48 pm

    • I wish you would send a copy of your letter to the Mayor of Owen Sound. She was recently heard to say that this railroad might be a good thing for Owen Sound. It’s now July 21 2011 and we are still fighting and will be for as long as necessary. God Bless Louisa McCutcheon

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Louisa McCutcheon on July 24, 2011 at 3:14 pm

  33. To the Niagara Escarpment Commission re: the request that Spirit Tree close their Tasting Room permanently, and close their entire operation for the winter.

    We must frankly tell you that we are affronted and incensed.

    This is entirely the type of operation that is needed throughout the Escarpment and Caledon. Their operation is sustainable, follows good conservation principles, and leaves as small a footprint on the environment as is possible. It uses the land for an orchard, which is wonderful. It produces cider, using technology that preserves the flavour of the apples. We have in fact been looking for about three years for sweet cider that has not been heat pasteurized, and so far failed to find it except for Spirit Tree. The cidery, bakery, produce area, and Tasting Room menu offer a product unmatched for at least 60 km in any direction. Not only is this cidery unique, it is in fact the closest source of any such supplies close to us.

    We ourselves live on lands under the NEC’s influence. One reason why we moved here because we believe very strongly in having food that is produced in a way that is:

    · Sustainable

    · Local

    · Focussed on quality and taste

    · Transparent as to who produced the food

    · Small / personal organizations

    · Agreeable with our philosophies and

    · Organic where possible

    We have patronized Spirit Tree since close to the time of its opening as it is very close to us in its geography, its philosophy, and its quality. Expanding beyond our personal horizons, this is an operation ideally suited to this area as it brings in and supports tourism without causing any damage to the environment. This is one of the supported priorities for this area. The story of how much needless expense and endless delays were endured to start this business is already heart-rending. Why they have been persecuted in the past during the creation of this business is beyond understanding. To shut down the operation (as per your request) now that it is getting established is outrageous.

    Having had discussions with the owners on a number of occasions, I am certain that they would happily comply with any reasonable request that would help the NEC preserve the area. How this unreasonable request helps those goals is not apparent. Please immediately rescind this request to have Spirit Tree close their Tasting Room permanently, and close their entire operation for the winter.

    John Patcai and Barbara Broerman, Terra Cotta

    [Editor's Note: the text above is from an open letter, dated February 16, 2010, that was sent to Mr. Michael Baran of the Niagara Escarpment Commission and is published here with the author's consent.]

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    John Patcai on February 18, 2010 at 5:39 pm

  34. Many thanx for caring so darned much about the arts, kidz and our community …. your new “adventure” is brilliant!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    David Nairn on March 25, 2010 at 3:53 pm

  35.  
    Before I even had a chance to read your article, I was receiving phone calls and emails with congratulations and wows.
     
    Iain Richmond truly captured the simple essence of Bethell House from many perspectives.  The picture of the hands draws one right into the spirit of the story. Not sure how Pete Paterson settled us all down for the photo, but he was successful.
     
    We are so grateful for you all.
     
    Warmth
     
    Nancy Hall, R.N., BScN, CHPCN(C)
    Manager of Resident Care
    Hospice Caledon

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Nancy Hall on March 27, 2010 at 2:38 pm

  36. Rockfort Quarry update: Special OMB Public Hearing MON APR 12, 1-4pm and 6-9pm. Caledon Community Complex, Caledon East. For more information, see the Coalition of Concerned Citizens web site at http://www.coalitioncaledon.com/.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Online Editor on April 8, 2010 at 2:44 pm

  37. Thought this article was a very good description of your life or rather of living in the country. Some of your neighbours are quaint and cute.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Iris Thomas on April 11, 2010 at 4:52 pm

  38. It was delightful to read about Christine’s ‘moving to the country’ experience.

    As a born and bred city girl who made the move with two small kids in tow 16 years ago I can relate to the delight and ambivalence of such a venture.

    It’s always fun to hear of others’ experiences as we all have our own agendas and adventures with such a change in lifestyle.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Lilla Fodor on April 11, 2010 at 7:57 pm

  39. When city kids get a little fresh air this is what happens!! Even after all these years Christine’s energy and enthusiasm haven’t waned.
    Our century home is on the chopping block. Progress will replace history and our little piece of heaven will have to make way for the extension of highway 407.
    I thought I wouldn’t be able to find the energy to begin the new adventure that lies ahead, but Christine has reminded me of all the fun we had the first time around and maybe it’s time make some new history.

    Thanks

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Tom Calow on April 12, 2010 at 1:41 am

  40. Dear Red Squirrel,
    I enjoyed reading your first musings and can’t wait to get a regular update on your rural idyll, the flora and fauna, dog, cats, husband, neighbours.
    Kind regards
    Banal Concrete Skylines Urbanite

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Richard on April 12, 2010 at 4:05 am

  41. I agree that Christine has embraced “Mother Nature” and I thank her for it. Have you ever had a hoedown in a barn with ‘ceilings that seemed to climb to the sky’? I have now and there’s nothing like it.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Becky on April 12, 2010 at 9:50 am

  42. Your eloquent words brought a smile back to this urbanite’s face.

    I remember our move from the City over 20 years ago and shared the exact same feelings – too darn quiet to sleep.

    Where are the sirens and voices that lulled me to sleep each night?

    Instead, I am listening to tree frogs, coyote howls and waking to the chirp of robins and cooing of doves.

    I’ve never looked back.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Corinne on April 13, 2010 at 8:24 am

  43. Christine: I so enjoy talking to you and now reading your “blogs.” Your love for life is effervescent and your blog in “in the Hills” was wonderful. It was written with such professionalism that I just wanted to keep reading. I too feel the exact same way about living in the quieter atmosphere of the country. Even though my husband and I have only 2 acres, we are thankful every day for the move that we made from Orangeville two years ago. Would never even consider going back.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Kim Perryman on April 16, 2010 at 1:12 pm

  44. Great article, makes one want to sell it all and get out of the city.

    I used to love it when we took the kids camping and it actually got dark and there was “silence” which is something we rarely “hear” in the city.

    Keep it up Christine, looking forward to more.

    Al

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Al on April 16, 2010 at 3:16 pm

  45. After battling the traffic on the 401 to get home from work, it was nice to read about a quieter existence. Keep up the good writing and I will stay tuned to your rural adventures.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Angie on April 16, 2010 at 4:49 pm

  46. Dear Red Squirrel,

    Thanks for more musings. I share your passion for lists, which I always lose, then start a second list, then find the original list, until I completely lose the plot. Sometimes when you’re completely at a lost as to what to do first, the only thing to do is to write a list to structure your thoughts and sort your priorities.

    Looking forward to your next instalment,

    Urbanite

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Richard on May 12, 2010 at 9:42 am

  47. What a fascinating and beautiful creature. I had no idea we had a moth so large (and colourful) in our area. I’ll have to research them some more myself and try to figure out how I might see one in the flesh.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Dave Welfare on June 14, 2010 at 8:33 am

  48. Thank you so much for another excellent issue.

    As a volunteer involved in the landscaping at Hospice Caledon’s Bethell House, I was particularly interested in the fine article by Iain Richmond (Bethell House, spring ’10) about this wonderful project.

    Two hundred volunteers! Who knew?

    In a happy connection to your magazine, our Bethell House committee contacted Maple Leaves Forever whose founder Ken Jewett was one of In the Hills’ Local Heroes (winter ’09).

    As a result we have forty beautiful sugar maples which will line the driveway at Bethell House, providing shade, colour and a connection to our area’s heritage for many years to come.

    And as a final thought I wanted to say how handy it is to have In the Hills online!

    We always save our issues but can’t always find them when we want to look something up.

    It was great to be able to read the spring issue online when we were away in March.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Diana Hillman on June 15, 2010 at 3:45 pm

  49. George – it looks like you have a wonderful bounty! I’m enjoying your writing and following your adventures on the blog.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Bethany on June 23, 2010 at 10:11 am

  50. An update to our Web Extra on cougar sightings: a definitive four-year study by MNR proves the cougar prowls in Ontario.

    From The Toronto Star (June 21, 2010)

    “A definitive four-year study by the Ministry of Natural Resources has finally put a rest to all doubt that the big but reclusive cats prowl the province’s wilderness.

    “Cougars have been here all along . . . we are collecting additional information about them now,” said Rick Rosatte, a senior research scientist in Peterborough. More than 30 pieces of evidence have been collected, including photos of tracks, DNA and scat samples that verify the big cat’s presence.

    Of the roughly 2,000 reported sightings in the province since 2002, very few have been confirmed by track marks or DNA. Ontario’s original population was thought to have been hunted out of existence in the late 1800s. The last cougar shot here was found in 1884 near Creemore, south of Collingwood.

    Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/aGKHXb

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Online Editor on June 23, 2010 at 3:29 pm

  51. Beautiful and moving. I love that this exists in Orangeville!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Jen on June 30, 2010 at 11:02 pm

  52. Hello Mr. Scallen,
    Beautiful writing….. I think you should teach language arts in addition to science.
    Love the blog. This is the first blog I have ever read…. very interesting.
    Take care.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Lorraine Adams on July 10, 2010 at 10:37 pm

  53. Fascinating and gorgeous! Thanks for sharing with those of us not so familiar with “creatures of the night”.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Bette-Ann on July 29, 2010 at 12:04 am

  54. Beautifully written, Don! And I learned a few things I didn’t know, too.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Bette-Ann on July 29, 2010 at 12:18 am

  55. I love the reference to bed head, Christine… I have been victim to thinking I would just pop out for a quick errands, and that is inevitably when I run into a number of friends or neighbours (but then I see the squirrelly bit on the back of *their* heads as they walk away, so I feel a bit better, ha!) Your blog really hit home to me. I remember calling upon a neighbour for a fire once when I was a teen. He instantly screeched down the road in his truck to the rescue in the middle of the snowy night, no questions asked.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Bethany on August 6, 2010 at 5:16 pm

  56. Update: Spirit Tree Estate Cidery (featured in our Fall 2009 issue: http://bit.ly/bSvBhB) is profiled on YouTube: http://youtu.be/y2ikz0n2yjk

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Online Editor on August 19, 2010 at 8:57 pm

  57. Update: Edible Hills’ author Roberto Frachionni featured on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQPF7XjQ210.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Online Editor on August 19, 2010 at 9:29 pm

  58. FYI… The book-launch of “Stars of Dufferin” will be held Saturday, September 18 at Mono Community Centre during “Mono’s Big Day Out”.
    Both artists will be autographing books, original paintings will be for sale, and several fine local potters will be offering their wares.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Mark Tichenor on September 14, 2010 at 8:02 am

  59. I come from an area of South Western Alberta with a healthy population of both cougars and elk and I have to say that the opening two paragraphs of this story reflect poorly on the author.

    The implication is that a cougar’s prime prey is/was elk. This is simply not true. Perhaps it was literary license to make the cougar seem bigger, badder and generally more dangerous?

    For the most part, deer are the only member of the ungulate family that they regularly stalk. Even the ranchers surrounding us rarely have cattle or horses taken down by a cougar, though they may well scavenge carcasses.

    Most cattle and horse losses can be attributed to coyotes, wolves or bears. Ms. Hubert’s mares were most likely NOT attacked by cougars, as they tend not to leave punctures on the hind quarters.

    As a person who was very active in hiking and hunting, I have spent an awful lot of time on friends’ ranches. I only witnessed two actual sightings, though tracks were more common.

    One of my best friends is a game warden and conducts investigations with regards to the livestock compensation program in Alberta.

    He directed me to this excellent publication on identifying the source predator.

    http://www.srd.alberta.ca/ManagingPrograms/FishWildlifeOfficers/documents/RanchersGuideToPredatorAttacks-May2010.pdf

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    edward on September 23, 2010 at 12:26 pm

  60. Don Scallen replies:

    Cougars do, in fact, regularly prey on elk.

    One of the publications I read as part of my research for “Has the Cat Come Back?” was Cougar Ecology and Conservation edited by Maurice Hornocker and Sharon Negri (The University of Chicago Press, 2010)

    This book is a compilation of articles about the habits and behaviour of cougars. A featured article is “Diet and Prey Selection of a Perfect Predator” by Kerry Murphy and Toni K. Ruth. It includes a chart entitled “Percent occurrence of prey animals in cougar diets in western Canada and the northern United States”

    According to this chart, elk were consumed more frequently than any other prey species in studies in British Columbia, Washington, Idaho and Montana. Looking at all of the 17 studies reported in this document, mule deer are the number one prey animals, but elk a close second.

    The suggestion that I took “literary license to make the cougar seem bigger, badder and generally more dangerous” also merits a response. That was not my intent at all. I chose to open the article by imagining a wary elk sniffing the air for indications of predators, to encourage readers to think about how profoundly different their hills were in the not so distant past.

    I wanted, as well, to establish the theme of loss and recovery – the loss of so many of our animals since the advent of European settlement, and the new and hopeful reality of some of them returning. The elk never will return, but the cougar??

    Lastly I thank the correspondent for his interest and envy his outdoor pursuits in such a lovely part of Canada.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Online Editor on September 24, 2010 at 3:29 pm

  61. A striking common factor among the former counsellors you interviewed is that frustration arises as the restrictions imposed by the Ontario government on local government are realized.

    It does not make sense to centralize rural planning in a Toronto high-rise when the workers there have never walked a pasture or woodlot.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Charles Hooker on September 28, 2010 at 12:07 pm

  62. I did the same thing, Bethany. When my kids came along, I left a full time office job for a life of working from home. The misconception that being a stay at home Mom is all about Kraft Dinner and Oprah still makes me laugh. I have spent more time at my kitchen sink than I ever could’ve been braced for. But, I have been able to earn a decent wage and be there for my kids while I’m doing it. Just this year they both launched into full time school — Wow — and I don’t regret my decision. As they say: Long days, short years. I am so very grateful that I didn’t miss a moment of those early days with my kids.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    RW on October 1, 2010 at 4:31 pm

  63. Thanks for giving this Thanksgiving!

    The Palgrave community kitchen was featured in a story “Homegrown in the Hills” in the summer issue of In the Hills. The article ended with the plea, “Anyone have old cast-iron frying pans they’d like to donate?”

    Last week I arrived at my door to find two brand new cast iron frying pans. No note.

    THANK YOU! Just another example of the Caledon community coming together to help. And just in time to use to make stuffing for 450 lbs of turkey.

    On Thursday Oct 7 starting at 4pm another example of community commitment continues in Caledon when we host our ANNUAL TURKEY DINNER!

    Thank you to the 55 volunteers who make this community dinner happen volunteering 500 hours to shell peas, blanch corn, peel potatoes and rutabaga, grate cabbage, make stuffing, cook turkeys, bake pies and wash dishes!

    To the seven local farmers who grow our amazing menu of turkey, peas, corn, potatoes, rutabaga, carrots, cabbage, onions, bread, apples (Van Dyken Brothers; Steve Smith; Betty and Ron French; Gerald and Trish Reid; Albion Orchards, Spirit Tree Cidery; Broadway Markets) within 10 miles of our event.

    To the 500 folks who come to eat, chat with their neighbours, share a meal (maybe even take one home) and celebrate the harvest.

    Happy Thanksgiving.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Barb Imrie from Palgrave Community Kitchen on October 4, 2010 at 10:18 am

  64. Dear Don:

    A great article, and wonderfully brief yet informative. I’ve always had a slight aversion to spiders, but maybe I have to work on this a bit. The stupendous colour in your photo is enough to get me started.

    Brian Naulls,
    Amateur nature enthusiast
    Grafton, ON

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    brian naulls on October 4, 2010 at 11:26 am

  65. Thanks for giving this Thanksgiving!

    The Palgrave community kitchen was featured in a story “Homegrown in the Hills” in the summer issue of In the Hills. The article ended with the plea, “Anyone have old cast-iron frying pans they’d like to donate?”

    Last week I arrived at my door to find two brand new cast iron frying pans. No note.

    THANK YOU! Just another example of the Caledon community coming together to help. And just in time to use to make stuffing for 450 lbs of turkey.

    On Thursday Oct 7 starting at 4pm another example of community committment continues in Caledon when we host our ANNUAL TURKEY DINNER!

    Thank you to the 55 volunteers who make this community dinner happen volunteering 500 hours to shell peas, blanch corn, peel potatoes and rutabaga, grate cabbage, make stuffing, cook turkeys, bake pies and wash dishes!

    To the seven local farmers who grow our amazing menu of turkey, peas, corn, potatoes, rutabaga, carrots, cabbage, onions, bread, apples (Van Dyken Brothers; Steve Smith; Betty and Ron French; Gerald and Trish Reid; Albion Orchards, Spirit Tree Cidery; Broadway Markets) within 10 miles of our event.

    To the 500 folks who come to eat, chat with their neighbours, share a meal (maybe even take one home) and celebrate the harvest.

    Happy Thanksgiving.

    Barb Imrie
    Palgrave Community Kitchen
    34 Pine Avenue (map)
    palgravekitchen.org

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Barb Imrie on October 4, 2010 at 1:25 pm

  66. Hello there,
    I am looking to buy brown eggs directly at the farm outlet. One of my friends said that there’s one in Guelph. Do you have any idea where the place is?
    Thanks,
    Ruby

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ruby on October 4, 2010 at 3:03 pm

  67. Interesting column. This Pearce guy knows so much!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Don Lemna on November 14, 2010 at 5:31 pm

  68. From The Coalition of Concerned Citizens (Nov 15, 2010) — The CCC has just learned that the Ontario Municipal Board decision regarding the James Dick Construction Limited Rockfort Quarry application for a license for an open pit dolostone mine at Winston Churchill and Olde Baseline in the Town of Caledon has been denied. The OMB decision is available online at: http://www.omb.gov.on.ca/english/eDecisions/eDecisions.html. CCC web site: http://www.coalitioncaledon.com/.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Diana Hillman on November 15, 2010 at 6:27 pm

  69. Some type of Goby, do you need to know the type?

    Rob

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Rob Tolman on November 18, 2010 at 12:44 pm

    • Alas, it isn’t a goby – though it does bear some similarity to that invasive pest. The fish in the photos is a true native and it inhabits the same cool headwaters as brook trout.

      Don Scallen

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Don Scallen on November 18, 2010 at 8:35 pm

      • OK here is another stab in the dark, how about a Burbot?

        Rob

        VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
        Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

        Rob Tolman on November 22, 2010 at 11:20 am

        • Sorry Rob – not a burbot. Burbots are a medium sized fish, usually found in deep lakes. My mystery fish is tiny (max 4 inches) and found in small streams, as well as larger bodies of water.
          Any other quesses?

          Don

          VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
          Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

          Don Scallen on November 22, 2010 at 8:18 pm

  70. Dear Friends at “The Hills” and McCreary family.
    It is a true honour to know you and to work with Michael.
    We look forward to many more performances and years with
    Michael as a stand up comic with Spark of Brilliance.
    Thank you most sincerely for mentioning us in this article.

    Warmest regards
    Judith Rosenberg
    Spark of Brilliance

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Judith Rosenberg on November 26, 2010 at 11:22 am

  71. WAY TO GO KAREN!!! Well deserved. We have been a member of the Everdale Harvest Share program for years and L-O-V-E it. Not only do we get access to some wonderful locally grown produce but we have been introduced to some new [and delicious] veggies. It is wonderful program and definitely deserves our support.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    David Donaldson on November 26, 2010 at 2:26 pm

  72. Very nice article, Doug, thank you for sharing.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Tracy Mansell on November 26, 2010 at 5:22 pm

  73. Dear Michael, You take after both of your parents! Keep up the good work! Hugs

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Grandma Val on November 26, 2010 at 7:31 pm

  74. Enjoyed the read, Lisa. Love the analogy of milk and eggs to music. Where do they really come from? Your article makes me want to have a home concert myself -here in Ottawa. Who could we invite as our guest artist? I bet you have some ideas.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Suzie Noaro on November 27, 2010 at 2:15 pm

  75. Dear Michael:
    I am a member of SMH Victoria & this article left me flabbergasted in a ‘good’ way. You are brilliant & I wish you all the best all ways! Thanks for your inspiration & contributions to this program.
    God bless you & I hope to meet you someday!
    Respectfully your fan!!!
    Annalee Este

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Annalee Este on November 28, 2010 at 1:51 am

  76. Nice article, Mr. Pearce.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Don Lemna on November 28, 2010 at 11:41 am

  77. Yeah Michael!! And a darn FINE sax man!! See you at jazz band – great article!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ryan Grist on November 29, 2010 at 12:22 am

  78. This picture (click here) was taken yesterday (Nov. 27, 2010) literally 5 feet outside outside our front door step (Concession Road 3 Adjala-Tosorontio). You can see our 1-year-old (50 lb) greyhound’s print beside it. I have researched this and now suspect it’s the footprint of a cougar. Could you please direct me as to whom I can contact to confirm this?

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Peter Kudlowsky on November 29, 2010 at 9:59 am

  79. I recommend that Peter send his tracks to Stuart Kenn at the Ontario Puma Foundation at http://www.ontariopuma.ca/links.htm I’m sure he’s already compared the tracks to the ones pictured in the article. Other examples of cougar tracks are found at http://www.easterncougar.org/Images/tracks.gif.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Don Scallen on November 29, 2010 at 5:13 pm

  80. Suzie, If I may suggest to you to think about hiring Juno Award winner Lynne Hanson who is in your own backyard. I wouldn’t be surprised if she would love to do it. She lives in Ottawa.
    You can try to book her thru “The Wilson Agency” contact name Bob Wilson. (check the web)
    Hope this helps
    Cheers
    Don

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Don Howard on December 6, 2010 at 3:21 pm

  81. Congratulations Karen – it great to see you are making a difference in so many young children.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Will Lam b on December 10, 2010 at 12:02 am

  82. Signe,

    It was wonderful to see Louise Kindree, Marilyn Field, Carol Hall and Joy Bell recognized in your magazine. They are cornerstones in our community and we admire all of them. Also great to see the amazing story on Michael McCreary. All of us want our kids to grow up and find their place in the world, so as a parent, it was a heart-warming article. To have Neirin on the front cover and to hear their story was brilliant. What a beautiful animal. Well done.

    Lin Ward, Hockley Valley

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Lin Ward on December 10, 2010 at 10:16 am

  83. It looks like a freshwater sculpin to me.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Gerald Barnes on January 3, 2011 at 4:48 pm

  84. I love this, I myself had a child at 16 and if it weren’t for a few teachers who made it easy for me to bring my child to class when I needed to and a few friends who would watch him on their spares I don’t think it would have been so easy to complete my grade 12. Please keep up the GREAT work, these young moms need to know they are doing a great job as moms but that they can still reach all the goals they had before their lives took a (very important) detour.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Becky Fabi on March 24, 2011 at 8:26 pm

  85. Wow, what a great article! I can’t imagine having to raise a child, go to school and work half/part time. I wish these hardworking girls all the best. They are benefiting themselves, and their children. Very inspiring!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Sara Ambrose on March 28, 2011 at 8:44 am

  86. I am Rae’s mom and am so proud of her. She has worked real hard at this and at times it has not been easy for her. I love u Rae!!!!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Kim Meurrens on April 3, 2011 at 10:43 am

  87. In the early 1990s Ted Webb and I rode our bikes from Vancouver to San Francisco. Even though I’m nine years younger, he left me gasping trying to keep up. More than the typical sports pro who quits in mid-life and spends his retirement exercising little more than his ‘glory day’ memories, Ted is a true hero of sports. He exemplifies its greatest ideal, to ‘never give up’. He’s still racing at age 78. Thanks for your story on Ted (and his Tour de Terra Cotta); he’s a credit and inspiration to his community and the sport of cycling. Dave Steen, Thetis Island, BC

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Dave on April 6, 2011 at 5:50 pm

  88. Thank you so much for this wonderful opportunity. it was honestly so much fun for the kids and i. i appreciate everything everyone has done to keep this program going.
    Another thank-you that is very well deserved also goes to Peekaboo daycare centre, where my children attend school, and daycare. they are seriously an amazing group of people that work there.
    Also, a huge thank you goes out to Gigi Photography, for these amazing photo’s. and to all the AMAZING parents that are in this program along side me. Thank-you, Thank-you, Thank-you!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Rae Hiltz on April 19, 2011 at 9:33 am

  89. Thank you for the very generous praise for our cinnamon buns. We’re glad you enjoyed them and we hope to be able to share them with many more of your readers. We did, however, want to clairfy one omission and give credit where it is due. We bake the buns every Saturday morning and make the gooey caramel topping fresh each week. But the hard work and baking brilliance that actually perfected the recipe for us and makes and shapes the dough into those fantastic little swirls comes from Sarah Hallett of Roseberry Farm (www.roseberryfarmcakes.com). Sarah works with us in the cafe when she has time, is our best right hand for catering jobs and runs her own baking business and stall at the Creemore Farmers Market. (Somehow she still has time for a life on top of all that.)
    So, after you’ve dropped by for a capuccino and a warm cinnamon bun, be sure to stop by the market to taste some of Sarah’s other fantastic creations.

    -Charlene Nero

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Charlene Nero from Creemore, ON on May 18, 2011 at 8:54 pm

  90. Congratulations. Thanks for pairing the perfect “recipe” (food in the hills) and the “ingredients” (what’s available in the hills) while showcasing our countryside and the importance of sustaining our agriculture! I also think it is the first time I have been considered a “maven”.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Barb Imrie from 34 Pine Ave Palgrave Ontario L7E 0L9 on May 20, 2011 at 7:47 am

  91. I really enjoyed your article on the fiddleheads. I can remember picking them occasionally when I was a child, but never as many as you have on the table, wow! You are right, you can’t get any more local than that.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Heather Porrill from Bay Tree, Alberta, Canada on May 27, 2011 at 1:25 pm

    • Hi Heather!! Thank you for visiting and reading my article!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Cathy from Erin, Ontario, Canada on June 6, 2011 at 10:10 pm

  92. Hi Jessica! Thank you so much for your wonderful comment! Our potato plants are just starting to poke their heads up through the dirt now. It should be exciting to see what we get. :)

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Cathy from Erin, Ontario, Canada on June 6, 2011 at 10:12 pm

  93. There was one at the Alton Mill this past weekend! Absolutely amazing!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Bridget Wilson from The Alton Mill on June 9, 2011 at 1:02 pm

    • Thanks Bridget. Hopefully we’ll get more sightings of this beautiful moth.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Valerie on June 16, 2011 at 1:04 pm

      • Can’t tell you how excited I am that this moth still calls this area home! I will try to do some mothing in the Alton area next year to see if I can find one.

        Don Scallen

        VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
        Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

        Don Scallen on July 11, 2011 at 4:24 pm

  94. I am honored to be asked by the farmers of Melancthon and Mulmur Townships to join them in their struggle to protect their water and farmland from the proposed mega quarry byTthe Highland Companies, privately backed by Boston multi-billion dollar hedge fund. As a native/indigenous man of the Turtle Clan Mohawk Nation, I have had a chance to listen to many community citizens of Dufferin County to learn of the concerns to the threat to farmland and clean water supply.
    Since hearing those concerns I have had a chance to view the document and research by the Suzuki Foundation. The location of this mega qarry is near the headwaters of many major rivers: the Grand, Pine, Nottawasaga, Saugeen, Noisy, Boyne, and Mad. Beneath these rivers lie the pure flowing aquifers that are a drinking source to surrounding towns and cities for at least a million people. Second to the issue of fresh water supply is the quality of soil available to the farmers of the area.
    This type of soil is called Honeywood silt loam and the Ontario Federation of Agriculture has asked the Township of Melancthon to classify the region as a Specialty Crops Area, a designation that would afford the land the highest priority of protection for ongoing crop production. Looking at the scope of such an open-pit mega quarry in the heartland of farming country and its impact on production of a food supply for our future generations seems odd, even insane, to me to put it mildly. In fact, the development of this mega quarry is a negative and serious problem to society and farmland.
    A positive business would not destroy productive agricultural land or activity that sustains life and people. The quarry is so negative it would alter the headwaters of at least five rivers that many species depend on: fox, coyote, wolf, beaver, lynx, rabbit, deer, ducks, geese, turkey, pike, pickerel, trout, salmon, turtles, salamanders, snakes, and many others who rely on these rivers and expect us to be their voice as is the duty of us Human Beings.
    It is obvious to many that this quarry would create a wasteland and dust in a rural farmland setting. It can poison the drinking water for our children and our children’s children and their children, so we must think of protecting their future. Our elders say we must think Seven Generations ahead! This is our way of life and it must not be changed for profit and your way of life must not be changed for profit. Profit is not supposed to destroy drinking water; profit is not supposed to destroy prime farmland.
    If we poison our food supply we will have to eat it, if we poison our water we will have to drink it, but our children will have to as well . Are they supposed to suffer from our mistakes, our neglect our negativity against life? Is this kind of crime allowed to happen in the history of our civilization with all the lawyers, police, army and justice in Canada? We need laws and agendas enforced to protect life! Who will protect Mother Earth and her Blood? We cannot eat limestone or drink mud! We need our fresh water supply protected!!!
    The researchers at the David Suzuki Foundation are professional scientists who specialize in data and facts about life. Are we supposed to ignore the facts from scientists; are we suppose to ignore the warning of our farmers; are we supposed to ignore the citizens of Ontario?
    Are we supposed to ignore the native people who have an understanding and connection to Mother Earth?
    The hole that will be dug to extract the product for China and Boston etc… will be 20 stories deep and possibly 7500 acres wide, one of the largest open pit mines in Canada. Will Ontario allow such a monster to rape and kill life? As a native environmentalist I urge the Assembly of First Nations and Chiefs of Ontario to get involved in this struggle now and demand a stop to this development and all mega projects on the farmlands of Ontario and water supply!
    As a Human Being on this sacred journey of life I ask Minister Linda Jeffery and Honorable Dalton McGuinty to stop this mega quarry before things escalate because this project goes against life!
    When the people look into the sacred treaties of the Great Iroquois and Ojibwa Nations you will see that we were promised fresh water and game as long as the grass grows and the sun shines. The quarry will be an attack on our relations and our way of life. We should not make the land unreal. Limestone will not feed our unborn, limestone will not produce a rich food supply for our families in the future, and this mining will be a form of eco-genocide!
    These are my thoughts, my prayer is for life, we belong to Mother Earth and Mother Earth is terribly wounded. Our old elders, chiefs and Clan Mothers are saying over and over we must protect her! My uncle taught me a great lesson in life; he said ‘‘is if you are awake you cannot deny the truth, everything is alive and everything has a Spirit, our Relatives and Relations are our allies ‘’
    For Mother Earth and My Ancestors,

    Danny Beaton,
    Turtle Clan Mohawk
    http://www.dannybeaton.ca

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Danny Beaton on June 16, 2011 at 9:09 am

  95. Whether you end up with omelettes or meat I think it is a great thing you are doing!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Kelly from http://www.fromscratchblogging.com on June 22, 2011 at 9:56 am

  96. Hi Don,

    A little dated, I know, but for what it’s worth I saw one four or five years ago at G & G Greenhouses in Amaranth

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Jeff Rollings on June 24, 2011 at 4:52 pm

    • Thanks for this Jeff – hey, four or five years ago is recent! The luna lives! I hope others share their observations.

      Don Scallen

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Don Scallen on July 11, 2011 at 4:29 pm

  97. Excellent article! Shuff eloquently and effectively captures the spirit and momentum of the NO MEGA QUARRY movement. My only comment is that the fact that Highland claims that the quarry will have to be ‘dewatered’ to the tune of 600,000,000 litres of water PER DAY comes late in the article, almost as an afterthought. This is the single biggest issue with this proposed extraction, though of course it may not be for the people living on fertile farmland that could one day be a deep, rocky chasm.
    ~ Carl Michener

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Carl Michener from Alliston, ON on June 25, 2011 at 6:59 am

  98. Now THAT’s what I call statistics! Bravo!
    ~Carl Michener

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Carl Michener from Alliston, ON on June 25, 2011 at 7:08 am

  99. My Nephew Neil, pictured above from Calender for May 2011, serves also in Grand Valley Fire Dept. and makes us proud everyday, as do all our Firefighters all over our country and around the world. For years when my health allowed, I took a cookie tray, in my father’s name RIP and took it up to our Fire Hall here, every Christmas Eve. My way of giving thanks. Stay Safe, Cindy peace

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Cindy Gasperski from Jackson's Point, Ontario on June 25, 2011 at 8:13 pm

    • p.s. Forgot to mention in previous communication, my father also was a Fire fighter for years. Think he served around 11 years before he left the Fire Hall. Proud daughter and Aunt of Ontario Fire Fighters. peace

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Cindy Gasperski from Jackson's Point, Ontario on June 25, 2011 at 8:16 pm

  100. Let’s keep fighting. We need good Canadian grown food and pure water for our future generations.Don’t let a foreign company rob us of our precious Natural Resources.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Wayne Patterson from Niagara on June 27, 2011 at 11:37 pm

  101. Well said , Tim Shuff!
    This is the grandaddy of bad ideas.
    This would effect the entire local infrastructure, the water of all of South Western Ontario and eat up some of the best farmland at a time when concerns about feeding the growing population are coming to the fore.
    This quarry is the first step in turning our environment into a sci-fi wasteland. Surely we are smarter than that.
    Why not put the quarry in a place that has no fertile soil and no growing season to speak of?
    The Highland Companies would be smart to sell the land back to local farmers and residents now and cut their losses. This quarry will never be a tolerable idea.
    And if they are that rich let them build their own railroads and highways to transport their booty from a more suitable site.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Bronwyn fitz-James on June 28, 2011 at 11:19 am

  102. This is great, very well referenced. Very well introduced, great journalism. I hope you don’t mind if I make it into a pamphlet to be handed out for awareness. Thank you Tim Shuff!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Johnny Dib from Toronto, ON on June 28, 2011 at 4:17 pm

  103. Tim, thank YOU!!!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ken Phillips from Shelburne, ON on June 28, 2011 at 11:14 pm

  104. Tim has been on this issue since the beginning. Thank you Mr. Shuff.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ken Phillips from Shelburne, ON on June 28, 2011 at 11:15 pm

  105. Great article, but I am surprised and disappointed that there is no mention of The Coalition of Concerned Citizen and their recent battle and defeat of local aggregate company James Dick in their Rockfort Quarry application. I am equally disappointed that the CCC doesn’t even make mention of the Melancthon quarry on their web site. Environmental issues don’t stop at the imaginary borders we’ve drawn up on a map.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Matthew from Caledon on June 29, 2011 at 6:37 am

  106. Very well done, certainly brings all the facts together.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Kim Corlett from Shelburne, Ontario on June 30, 2011 at 3:21 pm

  107. The great and amazing thing about the power of the people is watching each person do SOMETHING. With today’s online technology you can literally watch the ripples of action extend further and further each day. The proposed Melancthon quarry is so outrageous, so offensive to Canadian sensibility that it is not difficult to get people to act — from adding friends to the “Stop the Quarry!” group in Facebook, to meeting with their MPP. Of course, this fight will not be easy — a quick review of the Flamborough fight has shown me that, but I have faith. Site 41 was VERY inspiring. And the Rockfort quarry. We just have to be as tenacious as those who are going after $$$ profit. Our profit will be in landscape, food and clean water today, tomorrow and for the next generation.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Donna Baylis from Creemore, ON on July 1, 2011 at 6:59 am

  108. The Caledon Coalition did an amazing job. It took about $2 million and about 12 years, but they stuck with it. We all need to take a look at their endurance, persistence and the fact that they won. They are true role models for all organizations fighting this type of disaster and I know that NDACT and CAUSE have watched that process closely. I believe that Caledon is organizing other municipalities who are leading aggregate producers to work with the government to try to bring some balance to the process. Again thanks to the Caledon Coalition, who I understand (and I am paraphrasing) were told by James Dick early in the process that the opposition would just fade away and the quarry would go through.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ken Phillips from Melancthon on July 1, 2011 at 10:36 am

  109. Tim;

    Thank you for such a great article in the “in The Hills” magazine. I can not imagine the environmental disaster if this pit is allowed to go in. We have farmed up here for 24 years and when we were looking to purchase farms this area had the perfect soil and climate suited to our crops. As Bill said in the article “there is no where else to go” and we always wanted to remain here and call this our “home”. Thank you for keeping the word in everyone’s face and keeping it on their minds. It took me a while to “get it” and I am going to live beside this mega quarry if it is allowed to go in. I understand people’s apathy saying “it is a done deal already” but PEOPLE IT IS NOT A DONE DEAL YET!!!!!!!!! Keep writing great articles, spread the word and send videos. I know the one of the blasting being done was the one that made me have my AHA moment. It opened by eyes.
    Thanks again.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Diane French from Shelburne, Ontario (beside and across from proposed pit on July 1, 2011 at 11:05 am

  110. What a wonderful article, Tim. It’s sad that the citizens of Ontario need to fight for their water and their land, but I have to admit, this potential environmental disaster has brought-out qualities in my neighbours that make me proud to live in their midst. The fight is far from over, but at least now we know, thanks to articles such as this one, that we WILL be heard, and that we will NOT stand-by when unabashed greed attempts to destroy our resources….

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    gail from Shelburne on July 1, 2011 at 6:16 pm

  111. Thanks, Tim, for an excellent article about the fierce battle to stop the Highland Companies from destroying vital agricultural land and threatening our fresh water resources in perpetuity. Country and city are uniting against this reckless proposal as the Ontario election draws closer. I think we should be asking every candidate who wants our vote to state their position on the mega quarry. One of the many questions we could ask is: Will your party promise that there will be no quarries of any size on prime agricultural land? The parties’ answers should determine the outcome on October 6th.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Tess Mansfield from Mulmur on July 2, 2011 at 10:38 am

  112. Thank you so much for that outstanding article, Michele…it made me cry! It was like all of the essence of who we are and what we do was encapsulated in a beautifully written piece.
    Thank you!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Sara Moyle on July 3, 2011 at 9:31 am

  113. We had one beautiful luna moth visit this morning, I have pictures also, 2 July 2011

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    chris Fullam from Richmond ontario near Tilsonburg on July 3, 2011 at 10:51 pm

    • Hi Chris, where did you see the moth? And if you want to email me a shot I’ll post it on the web site,
      vjones@inthehills.ca
      Thanks!

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Valerie on July 4, 2011 at 5:52 am

    • Another encouraging sighting, adding to our understanding of where this lovely moth still exists.

      thanks!

      Don Scallen

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Don Scallen on July 11, 2011 at 4:32 pm

  114. Thanks for this powerfully moving revelation of the issue, packed with people connections. The in-depth coverage and accompanying photos were instrumental for visualizing the impacts, illustrating the interrelated reality that makes this a crucial concern, and helping to reveal the monumental task of the defence demanded and undertaken. This seems a poignant reminder of the struggle that went into saving Clayoquot Sound but I feel exposure through excellent articles like this will greatly assist resolution without need for those extreme actions. People power + press = SUCCESS! With such great geographical distance separating me from my neighbours this has been a heartwarming introduction to the many passionate people protecting my backyard… thank you to all involved!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Jayne Wilson from Columbia-Shuswap, BC on July 4, 2011 at 12:21 pm

  115. Great recipe , however there are a couple of items with qtys listed incorrectly, orange juice should be 1/4 cup, Cilantro 1/4 cup, 1/2 medium red onion, 1/2 tsp of salt. see the magazine fort he correct qtys.
    Can this Salsa be bottled for later use? Frozen?
    Thanks for a great magazine,
    Ken Mateer

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    ken from Alliston on July 4, 2011 at 12:34 pm

  116. Brilliant work Tim Shuff and the “In the Hills” team. The information you provide in this article is extremely potent. Bravo!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Zita Harper from Mulmur on July 4, 2011 at 10:58 pm

  117. Thank you Kelly :)

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Cathy on July 5, 2011 at 5:42 pm

  118. Many high profile business leaders have signaled their support for clean energy including former Premiers Mike Harris and Erne Eves. (http://bit.ly/r0NUfZ)

    And now, the Pembina Institute, an independent organization, has released a study which says the wind, solar and biogas power producers under Ontario’s feed-in tariff program are being blamed unfairly for rising power prices.

    The alternatives are no cheaper. The FIT program would never add more than 1.5 per cent, or about $2 a month, to the typical consumer hydro bill, the study says.

    Read it here: http://bit.ly/r0NUfZ

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Keerthana Kamalavasan on July 6, 2011 at 3:14 pm

  119. Although I now live on the other side of the world to Sarah, I have to ‘second’ this nomination! I lived in Ontario for 2 years from 2006-2008, much of that time as Sarah’s next-door neighbour. As well as being a fantastic friend, she is also a fantastic cook, always trying new recipes, and creating her own. I was constantly impressed and inspired by the range of goods she baked, both for her stall at Creemore Farmers’ Market and for local cafes. Reading about the ginger cake is making my mouth water as I can just imagine how delicious it is!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Kate Pendlenton from Brunei, Borneo on July 9, 2011 at 5:14 am

  120. Lets keep fighting this quarry….Please don’t stop, don’t get tired, don’t give up…it will be worth the fight in the end…Our land is so precious…we need to keep our land for growing our foods and our wild life….not have it taken away…. turn our water into poison and homes worthless. So please don’t stop the fight. Let the U.S. company wreck there own land and roads. They say they are friends to Canada , well this sure doesn’t look like it. Leave our dirt where it is and move on. DON’T STOP, DON’T BECOME TIRED EVERYONE COUNTS…..FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT!! Save our land.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Donna from Grand Valley, On on July 14, 2011 at 8:22 am

  121. I am against the Quarry

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    M.E.McNair on July 22, 2011 at 3:21 pm

  122. Bravo!!! We need all the information we can get. This is really Wonderful keep it up .I would love to know who is connected to Who with the Quarry and the Turbines
    Louisa McCutcheon from Grey Highlands July 24 at 1.25 / reply

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Louisa McCutcheon on July 24, 2011 at 1:31 pm

  123. Thirlled with your tail of “return to earth ” Keep writing ~~~

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Shirley Barca on July 25, 2011 at 1:23 pm

  124. The prefix ‘South Mulmur’, and the absence of an indication of how the Shakespeare Study Group might be contacted, may have left readers of Cecily Ross’s gratifying article (‘Reading Shakespeare in Mulmur’, Summer, 2011) with the impression that we are limited to residents of south Mulmur and closed to newcomers. In fact, members of the group come from Palgrave, Orangeville, Creemore, Meaford and Mono as well as Mulmur. We can be reached through lilactreefarm@gmail.com

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Brian Bixley from Mulmur on August 7, 2011 at 1:47 pm

  125. I enjoyed the article very much. It was both thought provoking and a bit frightening. Are we really prepared to accept the damage to the area, the known and unknown risks associated with such a project? I hope not.
    One of the most typical justifications for such an undertaking is that the Province of Ontario needs this material for buildings, roads etc. There is some merit to this argument IF the material are solely for consumption within the province, perhaps Canada.
    I was disappointed that the article does not emphasize that they are in the process of purchasing a railroad to Owen Sound. Does this not lead to the conclusion they will be destroying OUR land,water and environment only to ship material abroad? How does this project really benefit the people of Ontario, this being the case?

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Nick Green from Orton, Ontario on August 13, 2011 at 10:38 am

  126. This whole thing is outrageous!!! There are videos on Youtube of historic buildings beeing demolished, pictures of habitat being destroyed in case of the EA, and propaganda videos by HC of the project. People of Ontario need to stand up to this as it’s going to affect millions of us.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ben Wilks from Mulmur on August 23, 2011 at 1:25 pm

  127. I too have been affected by the “Rural Mail box Safety Assessment” – the box you understand has been there for more than 40 years with no problems that I have known and I have lived on this road since 1965 … in my case my only viable option other than a community mailbox or post office box was to move the box more than 50 yds down the road – it would be on my neighbor’s property. And how safe to walk for me in the winter time on an icy road especially on the sides?

    I am against that because even if she agreed to this if she ever moved – well I could be left in a fix – and on two seconds notice. No not an option. When they came I offered a 4th alternative – to move it farther down on my property – they agreed to “assess” the issue – they would wait to see if any traffic came down so they could test their criteria. Well none could have come in that time because they brought their own car plus an additional one (at whose expense I wonder) to test it out 3 days later. Well you can guess the outcome – “no go” she said.

    At any rate I did go for the community mailbox option to which I am changing ( called their customer service hotline ) my mind – opting for a post office box – figuring the post office a safer option than the community boxes personally I wonder about their safety. And in truth unless weather is bad I am out town every day. And if I move again within the town address can be the same.

    What bothers me most is that there is no communication as to what their criteria is other than the issue of the hill – person that came to the door was nice I will say that as was the Customer Service person on the hotline. But it is the fact they do not tell you what their criteria is – in my case she blamed in on the hill just above my house. True it is somewhat risky but that is what defensive driving is all about in my mind and this box like others on my road have been there for years.

    In the end – just one frustrating situation.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Nancy Tippett on August 24, 2011 at 12:26 am

  128. We now have another MEGA project to worry about. Just received on Friday notice of a MEGA wind project, about SIX TIMES the size of the mega quarry and overlapping the same area. This 100 MW wind producer will dominate the landscape, kill hundreds of birds yearly, further impact the local environment and — perhaps — create even more dust and pollution from the construction and the ninety-foot blades turning to churn up nice limestone dust from the quarry. Again, local government and residents have no real say, although there are four PUBLIC meetings planned. Details are at http://dufferinwindpower.com a protest or civilian voice site designed to inform on this issue. Just one more thing to worry about!
    Let’s STOP the quarry and STOP the Mega Dufferin Wind Power project too. It’s biggest risk will, again, be to farmers.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Derek Armstrong from Shelburne on August 24, 2011 at 3:57 pm

  129. I’ve created an infographic that puts some of the numbers into context and sheds some light on what ‘mega’ means. You can see the infographic here: http://bit.ly/oj8IOC

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Jamie Kapitain on August 30, 2011 at 12:00 am

  130. I just heard the news. We get a full environmental assessment !!!! It’s not over by along shot but what a thrill. Surly we are on the way to success. Congratulations to all who helped. God Bless everyone

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Louisa McCutcheon from GreyHighlands on September 1, 2011 at 8:18 pm

  131. Amoeba News

    -A little bit, maybe.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Don Lemna on September 3, 2011 at 8:08 pm

  132. Sounds like I jumped the gun a bit. this was the provincial government making the promise and I was thinking about the federal petition that’s out. It’s still great to hear but I don’t have much faith in Dalton’s Crew or any of their promises especially right now with the election coming up . We are really going to have to be careful about voting this time around. Everyone is making promises about what they will do and we can’t seem to believe any of them. If you get a chance sign the petition that David Tilson is taking to the House of Commons and please question anyone you are thinking about voting for

    I was feeling pretty good there for a while but our day will come and the you will hear me shout from anywhere. WE just HAVE to win this battle. Please keep spreading the word. Every letter anyone writes . Every phone call. Every person you talk to about the Quarry will help.
    God Bless you all.
    Louisa

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Louisa McCutcheon from GreyHighlands on September 7, 2011 at 10:43 am

  133. This MEGA quarry if it goes ahead will have a terrible affect on our planet!!! If this happens it can never be repaired, I don’t understand how our government can even entertain letting a them go ahead with these plans
    Its all about the bucks!!!!! I don’t get why the farmers even sold the land in the first place??
    Really I believe this land was a gift to us to look after and for what I see the only ones that know how to do this are our native friends.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    linda wood from southgate on September 7, 2011 at 9:07 pm

  134. A wonderfully sentimental and accurate memoir of a notable Canadian Artist.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Wendy Torode from Boston Mills, Caledon, Ontario. on September 20, 2011 at 11:28 am

  135. They may have it on special occasions, the worms, but I’m pretty sure they don’t enjoy it.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Don Lemna on September 26, 2011 at 7:58 pm

  136. What a great article! You give wonderful suggestions for how to get kids to eat their veggies!!!
    I think the rainbow of vegetables you grow are awesome!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Jessica on September 27, 2011 at 10:10 am

  137. Hi Signe and the ITH Team,
    This looks like your biggest issue ever – is it?
    Anyway, I’m extremely grateful and appreciative of the work Tim Shuff and others are doing in regard to the Melancthon Mega-quarry We certainly are getting an education on the Provincial aggregate industry. Somehow or other the establishment of the Melancthon mega-quarry must be prevented. It is a recipe for disaster and would devastate the area if it went ahead. We have to put the opposition to it on a war footing.
    The Highland Companies should stick with ‘taters’ and not get approval to proceed with the highly risky business of ‘craters’ and attempting to manage and control the large volume of water on a daily basis that will be required during the quarry’s operation. Also the real threat of water contamination that could affect many, many people and all life forms cannot be contemplated.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Tony Howard from Shelburne on October 5, 2011 at 1:50 pm

  138. Youth Entrepreneurship session for Oct. 12 and Oct. 19 have been postponned until November. Please contact eatlocal@eatlocalcaledon.orgor call 905-584-6221 if you are interested in attending the re-scheduled events.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Karen Hutchinson from Caledon on October 11, 2011 at 4:35 pm

  139. They don’t call the area “Headwaters” for no reason. The quarry site is at the highest point in southwestern Ontario and all water flows downhill from there. Many of the downstream communities – Toronto included – pride themselves on their water quality, which percolates through the limestone in the aquifer and comes out crystal clear. Well guess what folks: that 600,000,000 litres per day (equal to half of Toronto’s total daily water consumption!) won’t be filtered any more. It will become surface water, spewed out by the Highland Companies’ pumps and picking up every pollutant it can dissolve on its journey to the city’s taps. So what can you do? Join 10,000 other concerned taxpayers at Foodstock, being held on October 16th at the corner of County Road 124 and Sideroad 20. You will be treated to food prepared by 70 of Canada’s best chefs that you will remember literally for the rest of your life. This for less than the cost of an average restaurant lunch while you help to preserve our water and save the land that feeds us. This is IMPORTANT folks. This is for your children and grandchildren. As for me – who has no children or grandchildren – it’s more personal: the bastards bulldozed and burnt my home, as a message to the others who won’t sell out (my health forced me to sell). That’s the kind of people you’re dealing with. But you don’t have to roll over. Google “FOODSTOCK”, get the details and come out on Sunday for the best food you’ve ever eaten. The best. I promise.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    William Perry from Toronto, formerly Melancthon, on the quarry site on October 14, 2011 at 12:05 pm

  140. HI Jeff, Thanks for opening my eyes a little more…..about the people living in their vehicles…That’s reality.I know people who has had to do that to survive.The cost of rental is extremely high and I cringe every time I have to go into the grocery store.If items are not on sale I usually can’t afford to buy them anymore.Being a full time student my household bills keep going behind.I’m 44 years old and with a whole lot of work experience.It is very difficult to get a job in orangeville.It is expected that you will work at the employers insistence…all the shifts .This causes so much havoc with single parents..daycare issues and those with medical issues.They don’t seem to care.What happened to being hired for the same 8 hour shifts so that the employee could organize family time,health, rest and feel an accomplishment.Instead,they are considered to have a JOB but know if they will get enough hours to put a meal on the table apart from the other necessities.This leads to depression in the community…….So I feel the way to help solve some of this issue is to go back to the old work hours.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Catherine to from orangeville on October 14, 2011 at 12:13 pm

  141. I’m sure I’m neither the first nor will I be the last to mention that the picture of the heron on page 12 of the Autumn issue is, I believe, a green heron not an American bittern. To start with, it is unusual, although not unheard of, for bitterns to roost in trees. Second, the markings and colours match a green heron.

    Compare the two pictures below. Notice the distinctive cinnamon colour on the neck of the green heron (which is clearly visible in the picture in the magazine) and the white stripe running from the throat.

    This has been a good year from green herons and I have been lucky to spot many in several different locations within Caledon. Bitterns are more elusive and I have only seen one or two this year.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Gordon Morton from Palgrave, ON on October 17, 2011 at 9:57 am

  142. Gravel: Are we forced to choose between the environment or the economy?

    The Rural Ontario Institute is pleased to be a co-sponsor of an upcoming seminar with SERA and the Canadian Urban Institue Oct 27 in Mississauga to explore how Ontario can use more recycled aggregate and thereby avoid the impacts of extracting and transporting aggregate. Other countries use a lower proportion of “virgin” aggregate than we now use – how do we get there from here so that our rural environment can suffer less degradation? Register here. https://canurb.org/civicrm/event/info?reset=1&id=68

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Norman Ragetlie on October 22, 2011 at 4:42 pm

  143. This is a really interesting article, but it raises a lot of questions.

    1) If North American worms were wiped out by the glaciers, presumably there’d be a “worm line” 100 km or so north of the southernmost point of glaciation. South of that, you’d have American worms (and plants that have coevolved with them); north of that, not. Is that actually the case?

    2) Surely a lot of these trees in Canada are identical to, or close relatives of, tree species that have evolved in the presence of worms?

    3) Trees in Europe seem to manage in the presence of earthworms. How does that work? Duff layers seem to exist in European forests; what’s different in North America?

    If you can point to a paper or papers on these topics, I’d be very interested.

    many thanks,

    Doug Muir

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Doug M. on October 27, 2011 at 3:57 pm

    • Yes, there is a “worm line” at the southern glaciation line. To see a map, and for more information, go to Great Lakes Worm Watch: http://www.nrri.umn.edu/worms/. The key point is that northern forest communities did not evolve with the same worm community with which they now exist. As is often the case with exotic species, they do not exist ‘in balance’ (a phrase I don’t really like, but it is illustrative in this case) with the ecosystems in which they are introduced. Impacts become exaggerated. So while native earthworms do consume organic material, their numbers and impacts are not devastating. Forests and other ecosystems have had thousands of years to ‘adjust’ to native earthworms. No such adjustment has happened in the mere ecological span of 200 or so years since introduction of exotic worms began. Conservation biologists consider the two most severe ecological issues to be loss of habitat, and introduced species. Sadly, I suspect the long-term impacts will be more severe than those we have witnessed so far.

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Chris Wedeles from Erin on November 8, 2011 at 9:20 am

  144. Please see below the link to the on-line, at ISSUU, publication of my book entitled “Landscapes and the Proposed Mega-Quarry”.

    As a 25-year resident of Dufferin County, and as a photographer, I am interested in sharing the book with those persons/organizations concerned about the application by the Highland Companies to build a mega-quarry in the County.

    The book will be available in print by the end of October. At that time, a note will be placed on the link at ISSUU, and on my website as to how to obtain, on-line, a printed version of the book.

    Sincerely,
    Donna Wells

    http://issuu.com/donnawellsphotography/docs/proposed_mega-quarry

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Donna Wells from Dufferin County on October 28, 2011 at 8:35 am

  145. the gravel play is bad enough, and your work is well done in this area, but the water is by far the greater point! i happened to see a t.v. ontario program this week on the subject, and the moderator said that the application was for the water pumping to be licensed IN PERPETUITY! this is far more grave than the gravel portion of the play. It is easy to envision the gravel portion to be an extremely profitable excuse to develop a way to legally divert the water from that area (note the “in perpetuity” part of the application) for sale to the highest bidder, be that bidder local or international. There is an end to the gravel portion of the play, defined by the volume of the gravel at issue. THERE IS NO END, NOR IS THERE A LIMIT, TO THE WATER PORTION OF THE PLAY! further, once the tap is turned on, IT CAN NEVER BE TURNED OFF! i am late to this issue, and feel somewhat presumptuous in intruding, but this would be a disaster if it is allowed, an absolute disaster! it ties in to the commercializing of water everywhere in the world. i have never joined a protest before, and have no idea what to do, really, beyond this sort of letter, but there should be a huge wave of protest immediately, if it is not already too late.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Dave Boswell from Arnprior on October 29, 2011 at 11:38 am

  146. One of your readers has supplied a bird photo that they have incorrectly identified as an American bittern. Actually, the bird pictured is a green heron. The wide rusty-coloured and narrow white vertical stripes along the neck are diagnostic for green heron. A bittern has light and dark brown stripes of roughly equal width.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Pat Hodgson from Toronto on October 29, 2011 at 11:46 am

  147. That’s a very interesting page. I didn’t realize that earthworms were nonnative to New York, New England and the upper Midwest as well.

    Thanks for the link, and thanks for responding!

    cheers,

    Doug M.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Doug M. on November 8, 2011 at 10:08 am

  148. Hi Don:

    I am an amateur but enthusiastic naturalist in eastern Ontario. Through the years I must admit to largely ignoring the trees as I move about among them looking for something of interest. So often our focus at the distance blinds us to what is right in front of us.

    What a fine selection of photos, and the smaller inserts were a great way to get to know the trees up close too. We have an old and expiring tree on our property, which I do talk to from time to time. Your article made me feel that talking to a tree is maybe not as crazy as the rest of my family thinks it is. I’m guessing you too talk to a tree from time to time. It will be our little secret.

    Your article reminds me of the Ents (ancient trees) in the series, Lord of the Rings. They had a lot of slow-moving wisdom and power, and were great characters in the books. Yes, there is something slow and special about trees, especially big old trees like the ones you have decided to focus on here.

    Thank you, Don, for your fine article and for a wonderful reminder to appreciate the trees.

    Brian Naulls
    Grafton Ontario.
    (Sometime Georgetown visitor)

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    brian naulls on November 9, 2011 at 11:55 am

  149. Dear house concerts lovers,
    We’ve just launched a brand new network, SLOWBIZZ.COM,
    aimed at solo artists looking for house concerts opportunities
    & at potential hosts looking for quality artists.
    Our ambition is to scale it on a global level.
    I invite you to join the movement ;-)
    Cheers,
    Frédérick

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Frederick from the world ;-) on November 18, 2011 at 6:08 am

  150. To the Editor, In the Hills:
    “Green Gravel” (Autumn 2011) by Tim Shuff is a cogent and clearly written article on the issues that surround aggregate extraction in Ontario. It offers some hope for reducing the current high level of conflict between proponents and communities. The SERA principles that he describes include “the environmental and water impacts and site stewardship” but they fail to address the disproportionate impact of supersized aggregate developments. Size is conspicuously absent from the discussion.

    Highland Companies is applying to mine a colossal 2400 acres at Melancthon. It beggars belief that the net effects of larger and larger industrial developments do not have a profound social and environmental impact on the community.

    In the Town of Caledon, from Kennedy Road in Caledon Village to the Town border at Winston Churchill Blvd there is a corridor of 3800 acres of licenced quarries and pits, with another 200 acres of proposed pits seeking licences, as well as 600 acres of properties amassed by gravel operators for which licences have not yet been applied. Taken together the collective mass of operating mines in this part of Caledon is potentially 4600 acres.

    In 2007 a study funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council reported that Caledon contained the “largest series of gravel pits in North America”. When is the cumulative impact of progressively larger industrial developments too much? This needs to be addressed before we continue adding acreage to mega sites like this.

    Our community organization, REDC, People for Responsible Escarpment Development Caledon is preparing to challenge one of the newest licence application for a property which abuts existing operations – the McCormick Pit on Heart Lake Road, a 75’ below the watertable proposition.

    In recent geological maps of our area our conservation authority no longer bothers to distinguish between the few modest natural lakes and the numerous acres of pit lakes which result when the aquifer is permanently breached during mining operations. Nowadays all are ‘lakes’. The irony of the Forks of the Credit Provincial Park dividing a wasteland of mines stripped of biodiversity is not lost on those of us who live here. Nor that our region in the Niagara Escarpment is recognized by UNESCO as a World Biosphere Reserve a precious world resource equal to the Serengeti but obviously not as valuable as gravel.

    Size and cumulative impact need to be addressed if the SERA Green Certification audit process is to be truly constructive.

    Christine Shain, President, REDC
    People for Responsible Escarpment Development Caledon Inc.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Christine Shain, President, REDC from Caledon on November 19, 2011 at 4:24 pm

  151. When I read Tom Smart’s article about Rosemary Kilbourn’s wood engravings and stained-glass windows (Light, Line & Lyricism, autumn 2011), I was reminded of her exquisite stained-glass window in the chapel at Hart House, University of Toronto.

    As you enter this tiny, non-denominational chapel, her strikingly beautiful window is directly before you. I occasionally give tours of the university to relatives, friends and students, and Rosemary’s window is one of my favourite stops.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Paul Aird from Inglewood on November 19, 2011 at 4:28 pm

  152. “Whimsical” Yes perhaps, “Naive”, I dont think so. But ‘Charming’, ‘warm’, ‘comfortable’, ‘Nostalgic’, definitely.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    John White from Near Perth, On on November 21, 2011 at 6:11 pm

  153. I have the pleasure of owning several of Susan Mein’s prints and constantly marvel at the attention to detail she puts into her work. Every work of art of hers, has a positive energy and sense of optimism, family ties and tight community bonds attached to the scene she has painted. In addition to her prints I use her cards for all occassions and have people keeping them on display in their homes far longer than any birthday or get well card would be. They are truly appreciated by all who receive them.
    Wishing you a long and prosperious career Susan. I love your work.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Shirley Cox from Essa Township on November 21, 2011 at 6:18 pm

  154. Editor’s note: Dianne Acheson’s first name was misspelled with only one ’n’ in the print version of the magazine. Our profound apologies to Dianne.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Signe Ball from Headwaters Region on November 22, 2011 at 10:15 am

  155. I love that Susan’s work conveys such joy and warmth, around the simple pleasures of family life!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Kimberly Day from Hockley Valley on November 23, 2011 at 6:35 am

  156. Susan’s pictures are simply charming: the perfect antidote to a modern and usually over-complicated Christmas. OK, so they’re simple, nostalgic and a bit quirky, harking back to gentler days, but – hell, so am I!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    David Knight from Cornwall, England on November 23, 2011 at 9:11 am

  157. Denise and I know Suzan and Doug for many years when they were living in Ottawa area. Her work reflects her personality; Suzan’s painting is so beautiful and colorfull with amazing details. I have one of her paintings and will certainly get more in the future.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Denis Panneton from Mont Tremblant Quebec on November 23, 2011 at 10:07 am

  158. Susan is an amazing talent. Her attention to detail is phenomenal. I am very fortunate to have two of Susan’s works and I treasure them. They evoke a simpler, more joyful and peaceful time and always make me feel happy. Who could ask for more from art.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Fran Green from Ottawa, Ontario on November 23, 2011 at 10:16 am

  159. Susan’s paintings do not depict what I actually saw in the countryside shortly after the war. They do represent what most of us felt about winter and Christmas in our early years. I never enjoyed skating as much as when I first learned while exploring a small, frozen river, or when being pulled behind a horse-drawn sleigh on icy country roads. I recall the very basic, warm friendliness of rural folks that she shows us. Things changed slowly in those days, especially in the country, so what I speak of was not unlike what happened decades earlier, too. Peace was more realistic as a hope, and richness was in the heart more than the pocketbook.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Trygve Bratteteig from Mississauga on November 23, 2011 at 12:53 pm

  160. Suzan impresses me a lot with her talent. Her paintings although very complex gives a very peaceful feeling. Although I like all her paintings, I enjoy particularly Holly Lane, Skating on the Tay, A Day in the Village and Christmas on Mill Street. The winter sceneries remind me of the great time I had the priviledge to enjoy in Canada for several years. Suzan, continue the great work!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Francois F from Zurich, Switzerland on November 24, 2011 at 5:45 pm

  161. They are just beautiful Susan, Doug was telling us in the summer what beautiful work you did but I never imagined they would be as special as these. WOW.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Sharon Larin from Canada on November 25, 2011 at 7:26 am

  162. What a fun way to end a distinguished career. We applaud Ken who is a great entertainer and loves Canadian history so putting the two together makes for an entertaining and informative speaker.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    jeanette gotz from tulsa, Oklahoma on November 25, 2011 at 10:16 am

  163. It is so nice to see the struggles of Newfoundland bought to life…and how difficult life was on the island being of the younger generation from Newfoundland I have experienced hard times but not to the extent of the earlier years. I sit and listen to the older generation talk and tells stories on how it used to be and you often wonder how in gods name they even survived……I guess it just makes us the proud people we are today!!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Peter Yetman from Brampton, Ontario on November 27, 2011 at 1:37 am

  164. Allan drive has just completed Pahse 1 of the Jan Scott Memorial Outdoor Classroom. This outdoor learning space was undertaken by the entire school and headed up by our Green Team. On the heals of this article about Herb Campbell’s efforts to act in an environmentally responsible manner, I thought you might like to cover a piece on this in your next issue.

    The Parent rep ( Sandhya Casson) leading this up in conjunction with the Green team ( lead teacher Diane Gahagan).

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Sue-Anne Vincze from Allan Drive Middle School on November 28, 2011 at 9:54 am

  165. My wife Siv and I have been lucky to know Susan and her famous painting skills for almost two decades and we brought some of them over to Europe when we left Montreal. So fortunately we can still enjoy her beautiful paintings. We wish her all the success for the future!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    John Karbro from Norrköping Sweden on November 30, 2011 at 11:44 am

  166. In late November, Giddy Yoyo won the 2011 “People’s Choice Award” from the Canadian Health Food Association (CHFA), Canada’s largest national trade association devoted to the natural foods industry. Giddy Yoyo was selected from among 550 exhibitors at the CHFA Expo East in Toronto, attended by approximately 2900.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Signe from Headwaters Region on December 13, 2011 at 8:22 am

  167. “In late November, Giddy Yoyo won the 2011 “People’s Choice Award” from the Canadian Health Food Association (CHFA), Canada’s largest national trade association devoted to the natural foods industry. Giddy Yoyo was selected from among 550 exhibitors at the CHFA Expo East in Toronto, attended by approximately 2900.”

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Signe Ball from In The Hills on December 13, 2011 at 8:25 am

  168. I absolutely ADORED your winter issue cover by Shelagh Armstrong and the accompanying short story “Spirit of Christmas” by John Denison. As a one-horse owner of 35 years (He’s a Morgan-what can I say, he’s as tough as nails!), the cover transported me back to a time when I was a horse-struck young girl still in love with Christmas. The night hues and colours and the simply majesty of the horses evoked in me the magic of the holidays when I would spend many a Christmas Eve with my beloved friend. Thank you to the artist and author for this gift.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Tracey Holmgren from Mono on January 15, 2012 at 1:01 pm

  169. Beautifully written! Anne, you are certainly one of my Hero’s.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Adrienne from Mooresville, North Carolina on January 15, 2012 at 1:19 pm

  170. Thank you for your coverage of this potential mega-mistake. While Ontarians do need aggregate, Melancthon (90 minutes north west of Toronto) is not a good location to be extracting below the water table. The water from this headwaters area runs south to Lake Erie, west to Lake Huron and north/east to Georgian Bay. It is source water for one million Ontarians. This area is also productive prime farmland. The cost of aggregate taken from this area will be paid by Ontarians in fresh food and clean water. Walkerton showed us the dangers of contaminated water. It is a cost that Ontarians cannot afford to pay. For more information see http://www.facebook.com/friends.of.ndact

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    No Mega Quarry from Guelph on January 16, 2012 at 11:45 am

  171. Fabulous videos! Inspiring!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Marci Lipman on January 31, 2012 at 5:44 pm

  172. Wonderful article Anne, and it feels nice to meet you, though not in person. You are a ‘hero’ in my book also. I know of you through your father and our modern day ‘pen-pal’ connection. My husband and I both enjoyed reading the article.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Barbara Soloski Albin from California, USA on February 5, 2012 at 4:20 pm

  173. I have to come and see Looks great. I love soup.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Mom on February 17, 2012 at 8:07 am

  174. I love your soup tips…even though your soup looks like compost!! lol! kidding.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Michelle on February 20, 2012 at 3:23 pm

  175. I was delighted to see that Ken Weber had set a puzzle that I actually could solve – had the letter been signed “Elizabeth R” it would have been more problematic.

    However, in the Border Challenge in Erin, Newfoundland and Labrador was excluded from the possible answers as it wasn’t a province of Canada in 1924. Therefore, the state of Alaska should also be excluded because it wasn’t a state in 1924. It achieved that honor in 1959 followed by Hawaii in 1960. I’m not sure about the dates of “statehood” for the other 48 states, but I’m old enough to remember both of these events.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Steve Brown from Mulmur on March 26, 2012 at 7:12 am

  176. I very much enjoyed the article about Win Hand & the Stanton Hotel. Can you suggest some sources that I can check out for information on his hotel business? I liked your analysis of his character and agree with it, for the most part. I’m not sure that the three Hand brothers engaged in a “mighty brawl” after the Mulmur council meeting. I think they were showing off their physical prowess, as men are inclined to do, and merely wrestling.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Anne Fisher on March 26, 2012 at 2:02 pm

    • Three possible sources for further information, two of which I used and neither of which were expansive. One source is Orangeville Sun, editions from c. 1870 to c. 1878. References to Win Hand are mostly news stories about his constabulary activities. There are references, mostly asides, about his hotel ownerships. The latter can be confirmed in the land title office (second source). The third source should be court records. These__again should__be in the Ontario Public Archives. I did not even try for my piece because of frustrations at OPA in past searches. Possibly a better researcher than I would get results, although it’s not likely there would be hotel references.

      With reference to the municipal brawling Hands, the letter from Pro Bon Publico in the Northern Advance did not leave much room for an ameliorating interpretation. The letter is very long and, albeit in very convoluted and embedded Victorian prose, leaves little doubt that Mulmur’s Council in the 1860 and 70s conducted itself in a very frontier-like style.

      Anne might also find it useful to contact Carl Tafel, Chair of the Mulmur Abandoned Cemeteries/Heritage Committee.

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Ken Weber from Caledon on March 27, 2012 at 5:51 pm

  177. I hear the “bug” of the north is very contagious, I think it can even spread through a great article like this. I look forward to our coming trips there too!
    Colin

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    colin bunge from Wakefield Que. on March 27, 2012 at 10:11 pm

  178. Finally, some “forward-thinking”.

    As a high shool woodshop teacher, former 1970′s thinker and distant observer of environmental problems and solutions I was awoken by Mr. Rollings piece “Trash Talk” .
    For years as the population has grown, I have watched the various attempts to deal with the damage inflicted on the environment. And, watched as the planet corrected itself through natural cycles. I have also watched our own Caledon “dump” as it evolved from a “dump as you will” site to one that is regulated and Full.

    Why, I would ask myself can you not take the trash and dump it down a magma hole and harness the resulting gases? After all, there is some 3000km of magma below us. Mind you, I could also not understand how I wasn’t having my house heated by this same magma or have my car fuelled by the fireball in the sky. To read Jeff’s article has now given me some hope. A plasma cutter in a tank. The next best thing to what I envisioned. Well done!

    As for foolhardy, I hardly think so……………

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Neil Barnes on April 1, 2012 at 5:51 pm

  179. A very big thank you for the special promotion of both the tree sale and the identification walks that the Land Stewardship Network is organizing this spring. We really appreciate the support!
    Caroline

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Caroline Mach from Dufferin on April 1, 2012 at 10:10 pm

  180. Hi Harry,

    Not surprising you meshed the virtues of the old and new seamlessly. A beautiful result. You should be proud and the client happy!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Judy and Richard Gormn from Toronto on April 2, 2012 at 4:39 pm

  181. Harry,
    It’s a gorgeous adaptation of yesterday to today. Another Harry Morison Lay triumph!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Judy and Richard Gormn on April 2, 2012 at 8:37 pm

  182. Heritage Caledon, the municipal committee responsible for providing guidance and recommendation to officials in the Town on matters relating to heritage and history, is making a start this year on consideration of ways in which concern for the heritage significance of trees might be focused.

    While we already have a designation for an unusual and rare Osage Orange hedge, heritage conservation has conventionally been focused on built structures. Some landmark trees in larger urban communities have been the subject of plaques and even designation, but the matter of identifying specimens that were or are important in the historical economy of a now-largely rural community is more complex. The deterioration of living artifacts like the butternut offers none of the construction fix that can be applied to built objects. Nevertheless the identification and supporting publicity for socially important individual living tree specimens can draw attention to their plight and perhaps strengthen public support for research into disease remedies for the species as a whole.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ian Anderson from Caledon on April 5, 2012 at 10:37 am

  183. Your paints are absolutely gorgeous. I’ve never been in that part of Canada to admire its beauty, but I
    did take a trip a few years ago to Greenland and Newfoundland where I saw some icebergs and can
    appreciate the sizes of them. They were stunning! Your paintings are so realistic that I’m not sure I
    could tell the difference on my little computer.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Shirley Page on April 5, 2012 at 4:49 pm

  184. I came across this article by accident and was moved to comment and say how I love Houstoun’s work. It reminds me of growing up in the the Ontario countryside. I remember Mr Houstoun as a very gentle, patient and talented man. He captured the beauty of an area which is changing quickly and unfortunately not always for the better.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Sian Lewis from England on April 10, 2012 at 6:07 am

  185. DRC Publishing just released “My Story” by Nurse Myra Bennett. It is certainly a good read and very inexpensive. There is written material for another book that will include some of Nurse and Angus life together. They were always know as Nurse and Angus. He was her mentor, helper, provider when there was no help from any other source. He fed the horse, maintained the boat that transported her. He was the strong back that carried patients in his strong arms and rested them on the old home made kitchen couch.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Trevor Bennett from Irishtown, Bay of Islands. ph 709 7833257 on April 22, 2012 at 6:22 am

  186. I remember how, on a calm day when small boats (little boats) could get along; a boat would arrive from another community with, how ever many people it could carry; coming to see the Nurse. I remember in winter how dog teams would arrive (three at a time) from St Anthony. They traveled in pairs or three teams to take turns breaking the path. They would sometimes take a week from St Anthony to Daniels Harbour enroute to Deer Lake and the train to go on to England or United States. They always stayed at the Nurse and Angus home. Angus had lots of dog food prepared for the twenty or forty hungry dogs.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Trevor Bennett from newfoundland on April 22, 2012 at 6:38 am

  187. Jeff and Brandy, thank you! Having you both on board is energizing for us and I expect eye-opening for you. I also expect that the week ahead is not going to be your most pleasant in memory. But hey, there’s light at the end of the tunnel. In a week you can return to broccoli, low fat cheese and poultry… with a side of kale and 1% milk. As you both well know, the 800+ children, seniors and families who are regular users of our food hampers return for another hamper. And another one after that. Increased awareness is the first step. Addressing this challenge is the next step and here in Caledon we are on it with some big things in store in the months ahead!

    Thank you both so much for taking Hunger Awareness Week to the community. You’ll generate increased dialogue at soccer games, dinner parties and school classrooms about hunger in a community that has an abundance of resources to deal with it. We all appreciate your involvement and support! Monty Laskin, CCS

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Monty Laskin from Caledon on May 5, 2012 at 10:13 am

  188. On your Puzzling Conclusion, page 94 in the Border Challenge in Erin question C asks how many U.S. states can you name whose land mass’s touches the border with Canada. Your answer says New York does not touch. If you look on a map the northern part of New York state east of Cornwall, Ontario reaches until Interstate # 87 for about 35 km land touching land.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Caron Mailloux on May 6, 2012 at 12:19 pm

  189. Jeff – I will be following your posts this week… I often think I am quite frugal, but nothing like this. (And often the weight of my ‘green bin’ reminds me of just how much I waste.)

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Bethany Lee from Orangeville on May 8, 2012 at 8:34 pm

  190. Looking at your photo, Jeff, I realize again how blessed I am to have access and the means to buy “what I want, when I want it”. I am astonished at how leafy and vibrantly coloured my shopping is comparatively, and how that would probably be considered a luxury by most. As well, I am sad to think that some great ‘sale items’ that I can buy when I see them (say a large bag of rice, or a great deal on detergent, etc.) would be inaccessible to those on a tight weekly budget, and they would have to buy smaller measurements at a higher price.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Bethany Lee from Orangeville, ON on May 9, 2012 at 1:04 pm

  191. I agree, Bethany. One of my Food Box Challenge colleagues used the example of pancakes. It’s much cheaper on a per-serving basis to make them from scratch, rather than buying a box of mix. But by the time you’ve bought all the separate ingredients you’ve spent way more than the cost of the mix. So you either buy the mix, or you end up eating nothing but pancakes for meal after meal, because that’s all you’ve got.

    Also, today an actual food bank client has posted an entry on the CCS Food Box Challenge page. Among other things, she tells the story of bursting into tears when she found one of her dozen eggs got broken on the way home. Her whole post is heartbreaking.

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Jeff Rollings on May 9, 2012 at 1:34 pm

  192. Hi Jeff. And Brandy.
    My eyebrows keep going up with each detail you add. Things I have never had to think about. A lasting jolt, though, came with your imagining what it must be like to be in this situation “endlessly”. I think we can all endure difficulty, even extreme difficulty, if there is light at the end of the tunnel. But contemplating the notion that things may never change is just so chilling. Maybe ‘hope’ is as important to the people who use food banks as the food itself.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ken Weber from Caledon on May 10, 2012 at 10:19 am

  193. Hi Jeff and Brandy,

    I volunteered for four years at the Lighthouse soup kitchen here in town, and made quite a few friends there. Without it, many people would have to just do without. The food bank only gets them so far. We had people coming in and that meal was the only one they would have all day. What’s worse is for people who are celiac and have gluten issues. Cheap things given by the food bank are off their list (pasta, bread, oatmeal, etc.). As for starches, rice is pretty much it. My hat is off to you both for making others aware of what they have, and what others don’t.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Janet Dimond from Orangeville on May 11, 2012 at 4:28 pm

  194. Hey Sarah,

    The quiche sounds wonderful! I’d love to see (taste actually) what you would have done with the harvest from our Foraging for Wild Edibles Workshop last Sunday. I’m sure it would have paired perfectly with the hemlock tea. Pine tips anyone?

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Jackie Durnford from Creemore, ON on May 29, 2012 at 8:29 am

  195. So very interesting. Having seen the property and spending time with Shane and Marne, I know the love they have for their farm, and all of the animals that inhabit it. The animals are the lucky ones in this scenario!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Gil Cohen from Las Vegas, Nevada USA on June 20, 2012 at 3:13 pm

  196. Thank you for capturing the spirit and passion of Artists Against the Mega Quarry. This group has demonstrated there is power in a palette and vital stories to be told on canvas. I’m a proud member of the collective, one of the growing number of people inspired by a landscape the Highland Companies unwisely wants to devastate. Perhaps, the hedge fund behind the proposed mega quarry — the Baupost Group of Boston — should be presented with a piece of art from this beautiful region. Its president and investors are clearly unaware of the true value of the land they have purchased.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Donna Tranquada from Mulmur Hills on June 21, 2012 at 3:02 pm

  197. Beautiful place, lovely couple, honoured to have met them last week at their bbq during my visit in Canada.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Lucienne Mol from Prague Czech Republic on June 22, 2012 at 12:10 pm

  198. What a Great Idea! This brings the market back to the farm….and will encourage more to join in with their own commodity. Can’t wait to have local on farm milk in our area.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Lynn Hasson from Lindsay on June 23, 2012 at 7:17 am

  199. This is great news that we are able to bring back a couple of local dairies, and can once again see the artisanal element of milk. We can go beyond just on farm processing though, as people have continued to do even when not supported by the DFO (though incorrectly forgotten about with ‘no farmers in Canada were processing their own fluid milk on-farm anymore’), and allow full production of raw milk. If we are to become milk connoisseurs, there would be great demand for raw milk, from cows treated ethically, and completely grass fed. Perhaps we can even get to the point of not even knowing what herd our milk comes from, but the individual cow that we personally know.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ryan from Guelph, ON on June 23, 2012 at 8:47 am

  200. I live in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and I too was just graced to watch a Cardinal also pull down a paper wasp nest. First it went up two or three times grabbing pieces (larvae?) Finally it took the entire things in it’s beak and flew away. It didn’t seem at all phased by the few wasps that came out to defend the nest. Very neat to witness!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Sharain Horn on June 23, 2012 at 6:56 pm

  201. In earthworm-infested territory it should still be possible to find a duff layer where unpalatable species such as Beech and Red Oak are abundant.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Tony Perodeau on June 25, 2012 at 2:43 am

  202. Holy Cats! What a great article. I LOVE the responses from a variety of parties at the end. Brilliant.

    Can there actually be any doubt that this is about the water? The irreplaceable infrastructure that nature built over millennium will be destroyed by a greedy corporation, who will likely get bought by more greedy corporations and we’ll be left arguing with specters about who is responsible for damages that can never be repaired…. while greedy corporations will continue to profit ad infinitum.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    cookier from Toronto on June 25, 2012 at 10:14 am

  203. A fabulous story. If you are interested to see what a passenger pigeon looks like, swing by the Dufferin County Museum and Archives (http://www.dufferinmuseum.com), Hwy 89 and Airport Road. On display in the log house within the museum is a case of taxidermy birds, including a passenger pigeon. A99-063 The case of birds was made by accomplished taxidermist Jeremiah Phillips (1814-1892) who was born in England and lived in Whittington, Amaranth Township.

    Also be sure to take a look at the decoy case within Beauty in the Beast Exhibit (http://www.dufferinmuseum.com/Exhibits/CurrentExhibits/BeautyintheBeastExhibit.aspx).

    Alison Hird,
    Collections Manager, DCMA

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Alison Hird from Rosemont, ON on June 27, 2012 at 3:09 pm

  204. Hi, my daughter found one of these this morning on our porch, its as big as an iPhone. thanks for the info. I’m guessing as it’s a hot day today it will fly off in search of a mate this evening.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Giles from Brooklin, Ont on June 28, 2012 at 9:56 am

  205. The American artist Edward Hopper once said: “If you could say it in words there would be no reason to paint.” The Artists Against the Mega Quarry have taken it upon themselves to say – both in words and in they art – what has to be said about the potential desecration of our precious land. As I travel around taking photos of this pastoral and vibrant landscape, I am heartened by the efforts of those fighting the hedge fund Goliath and the damage unto forever that it is trying to bring to bear. We shall fight on – not only because the cause is just – but also because we owe it to future generations who will not have a chance to fend for themselves if we lose the war.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Bob Presner from Toronto & Mulmur on June 28, 2012 at 5:11 pm

  206. I was just at a dinner party with friends who informed me about the plans for a mega quarry & what it really means. Your article explains it very well. I wish W5 would do a story about all of your concerns & uncover the truth behind what Highland & Baupost are really after. I really think we are going to run out of water & we should conserve it & protect it. It’s bad enough that the Americans are draining our Great Lakes. Water is not a renewable resource & we should not upset our water table any more than necessary. We should also protect our farms. Who will feed us when the land & the water is gone?

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Karin von Nickisch-Rosenegk from Brampton on July 3, 2012 at 9:02 pm

  207. In regard to potential privatization of water sources (Battling the Bottle,” In the Hills Summer issue), I once attended a US Army course in Fort Huachuca along with seven other students from France, Italy and Turkey. We were wined and dined throughout Arizona, toured several industrial plants and met the governor.

    We also toured the Phoenix water system, where water from the Hoover dam is sold to irrigation farmers by the acre-foot, and were advised of a local initiative to pipe water from Canada, the “North American Power and Water Association.”

    A Phoenix television station recorded each of us answering questions. My question was what I thought of the NAPAWA project. I replied that it was true we had surplus water at present (1966), but what would happen if we needed more water for a larger population and turned off the tap? I anticipated a massive US invasion, and so did the interviewer.

    Under NAFTA rules, once we start selling a commodity like oil or water to the USA, we can never reduce the US’s total percentage of the product. Selling water is not a plan we should consider.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Charles Hooker from Orangeville on July 4, 2012 at 6:15 am

  208. As a former Queen’s university nursing student 50 years ago I was advised by a visiting American professor that someday the American Midwest would run out of water and come after us with guns if necessary to empty Canadian sources and to divert our rivers. Of course it is plain now that they don’t have to make war on us; they have all the political and trade advantages to force this on us.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Nancy Oreopoulos on July 4, 2012 at 6:17 am

  209. I was trying to find a website for Goodness Me pies so that I could leave a comment. My husband and I shop at Battaglia’s in Lorne Park and Jean Newell was just closing up her display table and packing up to go home. She was in conversation with some other people so we didn’t have a chance to chat with her about her product. We needed a dessert for company and chose one of her frozen blueberry pies. It bought back wonderful memories of great pies devoured in cottage country after a day of scrambling over rocks picking wild blueberries that were then lovingly stuffed between layers of homemade pie crust!

    With little time to bake in our busy lives, it is wonderful to find Jean’s pies in our local grocery store. I can’t wait to try some of her other pies. Goodness me, we enjoyed the blueberry pie!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Marilyn Plaxton from Mississauga on July 7, 2012 at 9:33 pm

  210. I was trying to find a website for Goodness Me pies so that I could leave a comment. My husband and I shop at Battaglia’s in Lorne Park and Jean Newell was just closing up her display table and packing up to go home. She was in conversation with some other people so we didn’t have a chance to chat with her about her product. We needed a dessert for company and chose one of her frozen blueberry pies. It bought back wonderful memories of great pies devoured in cottage country after a day of scrambling over rocks picking wild blueberries that were then lovingly stuffed between layers of homemade pie crust!

    With little time to bake in our busy lives, it is wonderful to find Jean’s pies in our local grocery store. I can’t wait to try some of her other pies. Goodness me, we enjoyed the blueberry pie!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Marilyn Plaxton from Mississauga on July 9, 2012 at 8:37 am

  211. Hi Daphne,

    I think I must have enjoyed your amazingly delicious vegetarian dishes at the Dunedin Art Centre back in the summer of 2003. I’ve never forgotten the wonderful meals we had that week.

    When you publish your cookbook, please let me know. I’d love one for myself and others also.

    So pleased to accidentally find you…..was actually looking up info on Dan Needles and came across this website for IN THE HILLS magazine. Love it! Is it published on paper and if so where can one buy it?

    Best regards,
    Marilyn BB

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Marilyn Belec Bittman from Canada on July 12, 2012 at 2:12 pm

  212. C3 gives me a purpose to wake up everyday. I have suffered a severe Traumatic Brain Injury which has also caused Epilepsy. I will never be able to drive again But I now am able to swim, bike, run with some of the most caring supportive people I have ever met. No matter how sad I am about my disability I can always count on someone from the C3 community showing up at my door to bring me to a swim, bike, run and leaving with a warm fuzzy feeling in my heart.
    THANK YOU SO MUCH, Anne Marie

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Anne Marie Gariepy from Hockey Valley on July 17, 2012 at 8:35 pm

  213. Monica Duncan’s piece on her and husband’s fowl adventures is a good piece of writing. And informative.
    Congrats! What about an update, Ms Duncan?
    John Ish Ishmael
    Brampton ON

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    JOHN ISH ISHMAEL from Canada on July 31, 2012 at 12:28 am

  214. Born in Toronto, raised in Oakville, I have spent time with my sister and family at their place near Mono.
    The area is so beautiful, lush and peaceful. The mega quarry would destroy this paradise for ever.
    It’s capacity to grow food for the people of Ontario would suffer. The abundant and diverse wildlife would lose valuable habitat and the trails would no longer offer the sanctuary they do now.
    I totally support the efforts being made to stop this travesty from going any further.
    Keep up the fight! It will be well worth it.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Elizabeth Wallace from Victoria BC on August 12, 2012 at 7:56 pm

  215. I have also noticed quite a few Giant Swallowtails in the garden this year. I had planted some rue since the Black Swallowtail caterpillars were eating all of my dill (I raise them inside) and when I found eggs on the rue they turned out to be Giant Swallowtails. I took the eggs inside and have been raising my first Giant Swallowtail cats. Two of them are getting ready to pupate and 6 more are quite small. I’m thinking they will overwinter as chrysalides but am not sure.
    I’ve also raised quite a few monarchs so far this summer and the biggest thrill of all: Pipevine Swallowtails! Found a female laying eggs in my Dutchmen’s Pipe vine and took the eggs inside. 26 hatched successfully and 26 butterflies have been released. Currently I have 72 more Pipevine cats eating me out of house and home! Pipevine swallowtails are listed as “temporary colonists” for the Hamilton area.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Thea Wiersma on August 13, 2012 at 12:49 pm

    • Hi Thea,
      Nice to know there are some other caterpillar nuts out there! Polyphemus and Cecropia cats have eaten me out of house and home this summer.
      I tried to overwinter giant swallowtail chrysalids last year but all perished. I put them in a mesh container and hung them from a tree. However, a friend overwintered them in his unheated garage and they all survived. So… it looks like they may need a little protection in our climate.
      I’m envy you and your pipevine cats! I don’t think I’ve ever seen a pipevine swallowtail in Canada. As you know they are quite rare, so congratulations! Perhaps the appearance of the pipevine swallowtail in your yard is part of the general northward movement of southern butterflies this year. Along with the giant swallowtails I’ve also observed two buckeye butterflies this summer, another southern species.

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Don Scallen on August 14, 2012 at 10:42 am

      • Hi Don
        Thought I’d give you an update on my Giant Swallowtails. I had 4 GST and 4 BST chrysalides overwinter in our unheated garage. I brought them in at the end of April. I am thrilled to tell you that all of them have successfully emerged! What a joy to watch them flutter away! Sure hope they survive – I haven’t seen too many butterflies around here yet this spring. Quite a change from last year.

        VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
        Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

        Thea Wiersma on May 24, 2013 at 8:56 pm

  216. Thank you for bringing a few introductory snippets of the world of olive oil to your readers.

    Just a small note: all my oils are at the international awards level of 0.1% acidity which is extremely hard to achieve and only the ultimate care of the olives, harvest and immediate milling within one to three hours of harvest with only the best quality equipment and master millers.

    Acidity is experienced in the mouth as a texture which is oily and heavy, as opposed to clean and smooth. As such, the creamy and buttery texture of the Oro San Carlos is unrelated to acidity – Oro San Carlos also has an acidity of 0.1%.

    Thank you again.

    Dolores Smith
    The Olivar Corp.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Dolores Smith from Erin on August 20, 2012 at 9:49 am

  217. Recipe Addendums: The Sabayon sauce developed by Bill Morris and his olive oil chocolates recipes are especially developed to complement the flavour profile of Dauro extra virgin olive oil. The sultry mango chutney has been developed to pair with the flavour profile of Parqueoliva Gold Series and its similar version by the same producer, Rincon de la Subbetica.

    If you get a chance to taste these recipes made with the oils mentioned above the flavour will be different than if a standard extra virgin olive oil is used.

    Olive oil is just like wines. A wine from a particular variety with a particular flavour can taste fantastic with certain food, and not so beautiful with other.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Dolores Smith from Erin on August 21, 2012 at 12:21 am

  218. I’m so for the local food chain…but I”m rather curious, what about the bottle, do we just recycle the bottle?

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Marlene from Alliston on August 23, 2012 at 12:51 pm

  219. Loved this article. Does Lisa offer any weekend classes. I would love to learn more! Is there a contact number.
    Thanks for interesting article.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Joanne Freer from Brampton on August 24, 2012 at 1:46 pm

    • I would also love to know if there is a possibility of any weekend classes (and) or contact…

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Stephanie Guimard from Guelph on October 9, 2012 at 7:37 am

  220. Great article, I had no idea so much water was being sold locally.

    One observation I might make, is that when I arrived from the UK in 1997, I noticed just how many, and how big the plastic bottles are in Canada, plus how many we use. Not just bottled water, but other products too.

    There are several instances, but to name a couple: Fruit drinks came in the form of concentrated cordials, one bottle makes about 30 drinks.

    Windscreen washer fluid also came in compact sachets. You fill the tank in your car with water (usually from the hose at a service station), then snip the corner, and pour in the sachet. I understand there is winter to deal with, and perhaps rural areas are on a well, but it is much easier to carry a few sachets in the glove box, rather than have a huge bottle rattling around in the trunk.

    I am happy to have noticed the introduction of a more concentrated bleach, and more concentrated laundry detergent. These products come in smaller packaging, and one can always “add water”.

    Just an observation….

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Alison Hird on September 6, 2012 at 9:24 am

  221. “Will the Arrow make a Return? Story from the Globe about the possible revival of the CF-105 – http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/will-legendary-avro-arrow-make-lazarus-like-return/article4530724/

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Valerie on September 10, 2012 at 8:34 am

  222. I participated in this episode with Cathy and coicidentally am a resident of Caledon! How funny:)
    Yes I do agree with Corbin, the mini pumpkin pie tarts were delicious!
    I enjoyed my time spent with Cathy and her baking partner in crime Colleen. We had a blast filming this episode, as cooking dinner for friends and family is one of my favorite things to do!
    Congratulations to the girls on their win…but hey Im up for a rematch anytime!! :) hugs Liz

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Elizabeth Fusato on September 14, 2012 at 12:45 pm

  223. Very inspirational Cody!
    My wife and I have interviewed a few ultra-distance runners.
    Here are the links to the videos, thought you might get some inspiration from them!
    Best of luck.
    Remember, when you start to feel like you’re done, you still have 60% left in the tank.

    Rich Roll: http://fitfortwo.tv/2012/09/11/interview-ultra-distance-vegan-athlete-author-rich-roll-episode-289
    Tim Van Orden: http://fitfortwo.tv/2011/12/05/running-raw-tim-vanorden-interview-episode-235
    Derrick Spafford: http://fitfortwo.tv/2011/01/24/man-runs-for-21-years-without-a-day-off-episode-135/

    Brock Picken

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Brock from Caledon on September 17, 2012 at 9:46 pm

  224. Enjoyed, “somewhat,” reading the articles “Living the High Life” and “Memories of Broadway” by Tony Reynolds in your last issue.

    I would like to make it clear however, that real estate agent David Maguire does not occupy a fire salvaged condominium as alluded to in “Living the High Life,” but rather an apartment that my late wife Ingrid Scott and myself toiled seven years to create at 83 Broadway (the first phase) and later after her death, in Dec. 1999, five years on the last phase (see photos before and after below). So to those who know Dave and have been in his/this/my apartment, and to those who, after reading the article, have to also know, it was never a burnt out hulk as Mr. Reynold’s story suggests. Different part of Broadway altogether. These are displeasing errors of lazy fact finding/reporting to me. Yes, I know the “theme” of the story is downtown living, and that message is correct, however if my building at 83 Broadway is involved, as it was, then it better be correct.

    Ingrid, and those who remember her when she operated her business downstairs at 83 Broadway as “Ingrid Interiors,” was the “driving Force” behind the creation of what is now Mr. Maguire’s apartment above. This all began in circa 1991 and long before Mr. Maguire and his involvement with “the condo’s on the North side” referred to in the “High Life”article. Long before anyone else in the post recession downtown “movement” for that matter. Long before “In The Hills” that bore this article. Half Broadway was “boarded up” when we began and virtually in the mid to end of the 1989 – 93 recession (Gulf war/GDP decline US/Canada, Mulroney defeat). It was our home, that apartment, in those early years before she died and mine after, up until Dave took it over as my tenant in 2008. Anyone that came along after the year 2000 or so and set up shop on Broadway, I refer to as the “Rainbow” people. They are here after the storm (the 90’s decade). No boarded up storefronts as there were when we began. No divisive WalMart debacle (1997). Vacancies are now filled rather quickly on the whole.

    The medians, in recent times and amid some controversy, were a needed and finishing touch.

    The building at 83 Broadway, circa 1877, was, in later years, (after 1947) known as the McNeilly building when Sam McNeilly bought it, (1947) and who later built a concrete block addition at the back (now Nurtured Boutique), from where he operated a shoe repair business a few short years before he died in 1960 (members of the McNeilly family still visit from time to time…they were raised in this building). Next door at 85 Broadway was the Armstrong creamery (1930’s to 60’s). It is now Broadway Convenience, Shoo Kat shoe, Dr. Nails and recently Coriander Kitchen, an East Indian restaurant. The store at 83 Broadway where Ingrid operated her business, Ingrid Interiors, from 1992- 1999, is now occupied by “Genesis Space Creations” and owned by Margo Young.

    I still own 83 Broadway and have many great memories of the times when Ingrid and I lived there and the fun we had designing and building what it is today, and yes everything about downtown living is true. Dave Maguire is a devout promoter of that lifestyle, lives it, and holds the torch high. He did not however, have anything to do with the building or apartment he occupies as intimated (driving force) in Mr. Reynolds article.

    One final note about Broadway and the stormy 90’s, more specifically the WalMart invasion in 1997 and their ultimate success in locating where it is today; all of Broadway was against this (WalMart coming to town) for obvious reasons. Michael Hill was the head of our BIA at the time and, although opposed by many, myself and Ingrid included, he initiated a deal to have the WalMart consortium sign into our BIA before allowing them in. Mr. Hill’s action, in retrospect, was the right thing to do and this has contributed significantly (added BIA funding) to the success we now see on Broadway today (BIA area…old downtown). Thank you Michael.

    Thomas Matz
    48 Meadow Drive,
    Orangeville, Ontario


    Editor’s note:
    We regret the error. It occurred in the caption to the photo of David Maguire’s condo. It was an error by the editor, not the writer. It has now been changed on this site.

    Below is photo of rear building (McNeilly shoe shop) at 83 Broadway taken in 1991 and before reno’s.
    Below is photo of rear building (McNeilly shoe shop) at 83 Broadway taken in 1991 and before reno’s.

    Photo of rear of building at 83 Broadway after reno’s and the removal of shoe shop building above.
    Photo of rear of building at 83 Broadway after reno’s and the removal of shoe shop building above.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Thomas Matz from Orangeville on September 21, 2012 at 3:01 pm

  225. Delightful humour!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Elizabeth Lauder from Orangeville on September 21, 2012 at 3:23 pm

  226. A very impressive, perfectly well presented scope of my Sister’s passion and God-given gift and path of life!! Johanna, after reading this I was flooded by memories of childhood and mid-teen years spent with Linda, often wondering where she would be and where she would mature her career and good intentions. I recently spent a week with her while she took a very well deserved vacation, it is very obvious she has superceded my expectations and gladly, able to read the political side of her career and her drive and desire to marry tradition with modern medical advances. I am very proud of her and her motivation. You wrote an epic description of Linda to a ‘T’ and it moved me to suppressing a tear.

    Thank you for your wonderful contribution to this website and bringing a new sense of connection with my Sister as the years and direction have kept us apart, even in this modern world of instant communication sometimes it takes a thing like this article to start keeping in touch more often.

    Warm regards,
    Dwight Everett

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Dwight Everett on September 23, 2012 at 10:22 am

  227. Sept, 26th at 3:30 PM…just wondering if Cody is on his way & whether or not there will be daily blog posts & pix as promised. I am keen to follow his progress.
    Also wondering whether or not Cody is interested in a couple of hours of company here & there.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Glenn Bourgeau from Palgrave (on a Bruce Trail side trail) on September 26, 2012 at 3:37 pm

    • Glen, we know he’s out and made it past Lion Head, seems they’ve had a few issues finding WIFI to keep us updated. Watch this page and we’ll keep you posted! Thanks

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Valerie from The Hills on September 26, 2012 at 8:35 pm

  228. As a golfer I’d say “Skip the Goose Poop” is my favourite move.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Valerie on September 28, 2012 at 1:18 pm

  229. What a wonderful idea ! and Bless you for having the strength and perserverence to carry through.Go Cody go!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Grace Sanderson from orangeville on September 28, 2012 at 1:19 pm

  230. Signe Hello,

    Please excuse my extremely bad manners in not writing sooner to thank you for the wonderful article and artist in residence spread in the summer issue of In The Hills. I love, love, love the look the layout, the writing, the photos and considering the wealth of positive feedback I have received I am not alone! The proof of the power of the press and in particular your magazine is in the numerous inquires and sales I have received as a result. As you are aware I generally sell my artwork in the broader market south of the border but this recent experience with In the Hills has opened my eyes and renewed my faith in our community.
    Thank you.
    All the best, Julia

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Julia Gilmore from Inglewood on September 28, 2012 at 3:16 pm

  231. Dear Don,

    Lovely story and your photos are incredibly great! Beautiful colour, lots of detail… perfect! Your pennant pair together is particularly spectacular! I love the slide show, too. Got to learn how to do that myself.

    Thanks for sending me the link to your blog.
    Margaret

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Margaret Bream from Toronto on October 1, 2012 at 8:25 pm

  232. RIP IT UP CODY! send it for the last kms. dig in and grab onto what you can, this is your moment bud. Enjoy it while others enjoy what you have done for them! Not only have you raise hope and money for people at headwaters, but you’ve inspired people, alotta people, not just here but all over the world, I’ve had friends in whistler hearing about what your doing! All of us at home here in Mansfield are so proud of ya bud, cant wait to shake ur hand when you return this way, and put a beer in the other hand. You’ve done Mansfield Proud, There’s only one field, but its a MANSFIELD, and you’ve shown the colours behind where you came from to the world. MANSFIELD!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    josh shaw from Mansfield! on October 7, 2012 at 1:10 pm

  233. You can reach Lisa Yates at yateslisaj@aol.com. I’m sure she would be happy to organize a wild food expedition.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    cecily ross on October 10, 2012 at 4:33 pm

  234. Very good article. Very timely but missing one important name.

    Janice Gooding single-handedly rejuvenated the downtown of Orangeville.

    She was promoting and pushing for the BIA, the Heritage designation, recreated the Farmers’ Market, supported the Orangeville Blues & Jazz Festival, and has mentored so many of the women and MEN who wished to open retail stores and such in Orangeville.

    Don’t know how you could miss her?

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Winston Uytenbogaart on October 12, 2012 at 10:35 pm

  235. Congratulations to Paradise Farms Cafe. Paradise beef is like no other, the best I have eaten in many years.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    BerniceLangley from North York on October 15, 2012 at 1:11 pm

  236. We have, what I believe may be, the oldest White Willow tree in Quebec if not Canada. It is estimated to be 195 years old with a diameter of 5.4 ft. It is a majestic creation which reaches not only great heights but spreads a canopy over a large portion of our front yard. We have named our farm “Willow Lane” in honour of this giant which guards our lane way. It has over the years developed a large crater which almost splits the base of this beautiful tree in two. I have done what I can to help it survive. I am looking for advise and possible support in maintaining the life of this living giant.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Victor Draper from Crystal Falls Arundel Quebec on October 18, 2012 at 5:56 pm

  237. I was throwing up a blog article on the Bruce Trail and came across this as I was reading up on the Bruce Trail. Congratulations. You must feel great for doing this and I suspect it will be something that stays with you always. Just wanted to drop in and give you kudos for all of it and say that you have some great support people from what I’ve read.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Darcy on October 28, 2012 at 12:20 pm

  238. It’s really great to see all efforts for artist and I think when we love something there are a lot of people who go against it.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    cathy on November 1, 2012 at 11:55 pm

  239. It has been suggested that passenger pigeons needed to be gathered in large flocks to reproduce. See

    http://en.wikipedia.org//wiki/Fraser_Darling_effect

    If so, drastic reduction in numbers may have precluded the possibility of recovery.

    The mourning dove seems somewhat similar. I wonder if it will evolve to partly replace the passenger pigeon.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Douglas Woodard from St. Catharines, Ontario on November 12, 2012 at 4:24 pm

  240. This article has saddened me. To think some of our community members are suffering in silence, in such a fruitful county, is down right embarressing. My family and I moved here from a larger city and were humbled by the amazing sense of community and friendliness we have encountered. I know these same people would be as saddened as I have been, and moreover, willing to help. Perhaps we need to get the word out each year of the percentages of food bank users, as well as the particular needs of some families within our county. This would enable us to make a community, neighbourhood or individual action plan that may meet the needs of some suffering families. The attitudes, compassion and kindness among our neighbourhood is plentiful and I am sure we can make a difference. Thank you for sharing this information with us. Its up to us to take care of each other.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Catherine from Erin on November 14, 2012 at 10:57 am

  241. I thought this would be the ideal place to share my Giant Swallowtail story:

    About three weeks ago, we saw our first Giant Swallowtail, flitting around our garden. (we are about a half hour south of Ottawa). Shortly thereafter, the butterfly landed on the screened window of our back deck. We were amazed at the size and beauty of this creature, plus the fact that it had decided to honour us with its presence. We didn’t think it would remain on the window for long, and thought that at any moment, it would be on its way. Little did we realize the butterfly had other ideas…

    It hung on the window for three days. Once in awhile it would shift positions slightly or flap its wings, but it never left the spot. On the fourth day, the weather turned nasty – this was the day that we experienced the wrath of Hurricane Sandy. With winds of almost 100 km/hour, we feared for the safety of the butterfly, so we captured the little beauty and brought him/her? inside, where we prepared a home in a large container. With 6 cats in the house, we had to find a secluded place for our little guest, and did so, in a spare room. We subsequently contacted a regional entomologist for info on what to feed an adult Giant Swallowtail. We found out that the best foods are a honey/water mixture, and sliced oranges! Our little guest, whom we named “OJ” did partake of both offerings, but really loved the orange slices!

    We would let OJ out to fly around the room every day, after his breakfast of orange nectar. The entomologist was fascinated with our story, as he is himself a butterfly enthusiast who raises Giant Swallowtails. However, he has never had the opportunity to “know one” as an adult. And our story was even more interesting based on how rare this species is in the region.

    We knew the butterfly would not live long, as the adults don’t. But we were determined to give OJ the best life we could for as long as he was with us.

    OJ died the day before yesterday, after having survived 15 days with us. Despite the fact that we were prepared for this to happen, we were very upset. The room seemed so empty. I can’t explain what a thrill it was to have been able to get up close and personal with such a beautiful, yet wild creature, who came to trust us enough to sip orange nectar, while perched in our hands.

    We feel honoured to have been accepted by this marvel of nature.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Marlene Harris from south of Ottawa on November 15, 2012 at 2:54 pm

    • Dear Marlene,
      I’m intrigued by the late arrival of your “giant” visitor. Perhaps it emerged from a chrysalis even further north and was making its way south. (Apparently giant swallowtails migrate south in the fall as do monarchs.) Perhaps it could go no further because of cooling temperatures.
      We are witnessing an interesting phenomenon with these lovely beasts – what appears to be a significant range expansion to the north. In this process many giants will likely perish before they complete their life cycles, but some may have the genetic wherewithal to survive and consolidate their “beachhead” here in the north.
      We have much more to learn about this butterfly in Canada and it will be exciting to watch them in the years to come. If you are not afraid of the caustic properties of rue, do try it in your garden!

      cheers,
      Don Scallen

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Don Scallen on November 17, 2012 at 10:38 am

  242. Dear Don,

    Your insight and consideration, needs to find its way to more of those people who make these decisions. I am a forester in the area. My heart is broken whenever these tragedy’s come to light. The truth of the situation for what I can gather is corporate inertia. It will always overwhelm the voice of many. They know of the awesome destruction they cause. It may even pain a few of them mildly! However, until the structure of corporations change, the shareholders will reign supreme, and anything in its path that has not been paid off or managed to absentia will be pulverized. How sick do we all have to be to realize trees are our silver bullet of ancient technology! Thank you for your thought full writing, take good care. John.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    John Hennessy from Georgetown ON on November 15, 2012 at 3:37 pm

  243. Many years ago when I was living in the Ottawa Valley (long before I had a digital camera) I was driving home on my country road and blown away by the site of a harvest moon behind this craggy giant tree, very much like the one above. I’m not sure what type of tree it was but it was mostly dead. In it’s cragginess there was such art! I quickly drove home to get my camera and had to replace batteries. When I finally drove back I was stunned. During that half hour that I was gone, they had cut down the tree. It was shocking. I sobbed in my car for ten minutes over this. I thought of the birds who had lost their home and of the missed opportunity to record this moment. It reminded me (and still does to this day) how important it is to be in the moment and seize the day; not to put off til later what can be right now and to really appreciate the beauty all around us.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Susan Evitts from Canada on November 16, 2012 at 11:13 am

    • Dear Susan,
      I’m struck by how emotional our bond with certain trees can become. They seem to touch a chord deep inside us. There should be standard procedures (municipally, provincially) to advocate on behalf of significant trees.
      Your “craggy, giant tree” touched you, but it also was important to the ecology of the area where it stood. Old, even dead trees, provide nesting sites for a host of birds and small mammals, they are insect larders that feed birds and they serve as observation posts for hawks and owls.
      Thank you for caring about trees,

      Don Scallen

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Don Scallen on November 17, 2012 at 10:46 am

  244. I guess no-one has to worry about it any more… the deal has been cancelled.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Richard on November 21, 2012 at 2:48 pm

  245. I would love to cook a Morrocan/Tunisian Dinner in that sexy Kitchen.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Dali (Casbah) from Toronto on November 21, 2012 at 10:53 pm

  246. Grandma,

    We are so very proud of you!! There truly is no other woman/mother/grandma out there like you…a true gem :) We are so lucky to have you in our lives every single day!

    Love you! xoxo

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    JKL on November 22, 2012 at 7:35 am

  247. My husband has a most favourite tree on Winston Churchill blvd heading north into Orangeville. It is on the west side of the road . It is very unique and looks like it is half dead ! He always comments on it when passing it . He plans on taking pictures so he can always have it to look at !!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Lori from Erin on November 26, 2012 at 2:37 pm

  248. What an inspiration for both young women starting out as well as the seasoned woman looking for a way to “pay back” in their own community. Your message is soulful and rewarding……in times of adversity, reach out to family, friends and keep going.
    Thank you for the well written article!
    Stay well and keep inspiring,
    Sylvia Wilvert

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Sylvia Wilvert from Scarborough on November 26, 2012 at 2:52 pm

  249. Incredibly interesting man and well written article!
    Thank you for sharing this.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Tina Daalderop from Bolton on November 28, 2012 at 8:25 pm

  250. Hi there

    We miss Dan’s “back page” in Harrowsmith for sure. We were subscribers for years and the first thing we would do when we received the magazine was to head directly to his column. As a recipe fanatic, that says a lot as I would bypass all of those lovely pictures of scrumptious food to read Dan’s take on his farming activities and have a laugh before getting back to the real life stuff. We are from Wasaga Beach and had to move west for work. We now regret not seeing Dan while we were so close when we had the opportunity. He is a wonderful writer, someone who lives an everyday life and makes ours so much better with his words.

    Wendy & Benno Gudzus, Okotoks Alberta

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Wendy & Benno Gudzus from Okotoks, AB on December 30, 2012 at 11:24 am

  251. A beautiful film that I highly recommend.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Carol Hilson on January 28, 2013 at 4:21 pm

  252. We just finished another one of your rhubarb pies this evening and once again it was FANTASTIC! We have searched high and low to find a good pie that tastes home made and not stuffed with fake jelly filling. Local bakeries and specialty farms can’t hold a candle to your pie. Your pies are truly baked with fresh fruits and the pastry is delicious. Thank you for being the only Rhubarb Pie maker we can find, especially during the cold winter months!! We’re serving your apple pie and rhubarb pie for Dad’s 82nd birthday next week! They are a family favourite. Thank you! Jacqueline Feeley

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    The Feeleys from Clarkson / Lorne Park, Mississauga on February 4, 2013 at 7:03 pm

  253. Looking forward to seeing the movie Still. Craig morrison passsed away this week. He will be missed in our village he was a wonderful man.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Debbie Stewart on February 13, 2013 at 5:47 pm

  254. Your documentary was like reading a good book and dreaming at the same time.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Anne Stefure from Tuktoyaktuk, N.W.T. on February 14, 2013 at 10:10 pm

  255. What a great story. I love the history of this old building and the the extent of the efforts these two brothers have gone to in order to restore this wonderful building and surrounding grounds. So impressed to learn all about this labour of love and respect!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Julie on February 18, 2013 at 10:11 pm

  256. I highly recommend the film which is now called “STILL MINE”… a great love story and shows what most of us have to face at some time with old age and/or poor health issues. Great to be a small part of this movie and to see my rough sawn lumber in the house and James Cromwell standing on my ladder in the movie. Hope to get a copy for our family to keep.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Rollie Fry from Loring on February 26, 2013 at 7:44 am

  257. Beautiful and inspiring movie which just kicked off the Kingston Canadian Film Festival! A must see!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Mary Ann Hhiggs from Kingston on March 1, 2013 at 12:26 am

  258. Thank you for a great article on the Rosemont club. Long may such places, live on. The next time in Canada, I will
    make a point of going there. Regrets I have, as my dear cousins Dot &Murry Morrison have passed away since then, I know it was one of there favorite gigs.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    elliott from Oakham England. on March 1, 2013 at 6:02 am

  259. I saw “Still Mine” at its second showing at the Kingston Canadian Film Festival. Very powerful performances and a wonderful story line. I would definitely like to see it again and perhaps have a copy in my own DVD collection…it’s that good!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Cathy Meyers on March 3, 2013 at 12:54 pm

  260. You certainly painted a beautiful picture of a very unique lady. Written in a way that I’m sure her husband and all who knew her would laugh and cry a little after reading your message. (in a good way).

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Codey from Toronto, ON, M6J3C2 on March 7, 2013 at 2:12 pm

  261. I enjoyed reading this wonderful tribute to Christine. I met her when she was around the age of 7, and she always had a big smile, and sweet, but mischievous grin! For her 2 older sisters she was a bit of a pain, but it didn’t deter her from her antics, and fun-loving spirit! I am very happy to have read about her adult life. Although much to short, it was full and rich. I wish I had had the chance to reconnect with her in her adult years and to also have had the pleasure to see her in her own element.

    Years ago, I had the pleasure of living in the Orangeville area myself, and I can understand her joy in living the rural life. I discovered the magazine “In the Hills” a couple of years ago, but never had the pleasure of reading one of Christine’s articles. I will make sure to take the time to look them up on-line.

    Thanks for sharing your story with everyone.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Shelly Gould from Lac-Delage, Quebec on March 8, 2013 at 4:42 pm

  262. A lovely tribute, thank you! I’ve sent copies of this to our relatives in England, they will be so pleased to read your wonderful words, I believe you’ve managed to capture her essence. She was a very fortunate person to have so many good friends.
    Christine’s Sister.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Cheryl Thomas Dupuis from Parry Sound, Ontario on March 9, 2013 at 8:07 am

  263. A fascinating story about the milk cream. I think that, finally, over the past few decades, humans are coming to understand just how complex and effective is the world of animal communication.

    As for the chickadees specifically, they are currious, social animals, and that’s why their my favourite at the backyard feeders. Once I was experimenting with a new location for a nyjer feeder in my backyard. As I was hanging the feeder on a tree branch that was about head-height, I heard the fluttering hum of a bird’s wings nearby. I looked up, straight into the face of a chickadee, about 6 inches away. The curious little bird was perched sideways on the branch, head crooked so it could better see and determine what this business was all about. No doubt there are countless such stories of human-chickadee interaction, given the nature of the bird.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Dean Scallen on March 9, 2013 at 12:41 pm

  264. I liked it when the birds landed on my hand.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Alexa Scallen on March 9, 2013 at 12:48 pm

  265. One of the many times I called on Christine and Wendell, I left my rubber boots on the outside door step because it was a wet muddy morning. After a nice chat and a cookie or two, I came out to find one of my boots was gone. Christine laughed and said that one of the neighbour’s dogs had called and must have took off with my boot. “I will give you one of Wendell’s boots to get you home. ” My boot eventually turned up by a pathway in the field and was delivered by my dear friend Christine. After 15 years as my neighbour, you will be so missed by all and your 90 year young friend.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Mark Nelson from Adjala on March 11, 2013 at 3:58 pm

  266. Christine was a real life force – you couldn’t help but be buoyed up by her energy when she was around. I was always happy to see her cheery face at my door – she would drop by unexpectedly – if she saw my car in the driveway she would stop in and offer to take our dog along with her for “walkies”. She and Wendell took care of our dog while we were away many times – our old pouch was more happy to see Christine when she came to collect him than he was to see us when we returned to get him back – going to Christine’s was like a vacation to him! I believe that a dog can sense a truly good person…and Christine was a good “old soul”, and an amazing person. I will miss her company terribly – she was a light in our lives.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Kirsten Ball from Mono Centre on March 12, 2013 at 5:40 pm

  267. Hi! I found your blog by serendipity and read about your beautiful friend and neighbour Christine. What a lovely and lively personality! May she rest in peace. My heartfelt sympathy to her family and you as one of her best friends. I did not know Christine but after reading your beautiful essay about her I feel as close to both of you as if I were a friend. Thank you it was a real pleasure reading your story about you, the dogs and your dear friend. Blessings and joy!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Joyce from Brampton, ON. on March 15, 2013 at 10:58 am

  268. Christine was a good friend and neighbor who always lit up our faces whenever we had the good fortune to bump into her at the Hockley General Store. She was one of the very first people to welcome us to the neighborhood when we moved from the Ottawa area to the Mono-Adjala Townline nearly six years ago. She was a very social “people person” who was never too busy to say hello to those who she knew or to meet new friends! Christine had a strong and vibrant influence on our local community and she was always there with an empathetic ear or helping hand. Mono and Adjala has lost a beautiful person who will be very conspicuous by her absence for a very long time to come!! May she rest in eternal peace!!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Doug and Susan Mein from Adjala, ON on March 15, 2013 at 11:17 pm

  269. It was a shock to hear of Christine’s passing. As a former web editor at inthehills.ca, I had the pleasure of working with Christine when she was beginning her blog…and had great fun discussing story ideas, structure, language, etc. She had great energy and enthusiasm…and a real passion for narrative. That love of storytelling and her adventurous spirit were a great combination, her stories were fun to read and as a writer she was so great to deal with: prompt, professional and straightforward (and wickedly funny). Such a sad loss.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Tony Maxwell from Mono on March 25, 2013 at 3:46 pm

  270. Mr.Scallen, you are my inspiration to the excitement to science (space, electricity and flight)

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ibraheem Nagee on March 27, 2013 at 7:55 pm

  271. Great piece. A balanced, thorough local update on the ongoing, entangled issues of growth across the GTA.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Liz Beatty on April 1, 2013 at 1:24 pm

  272. I had the opportunity to see “Still Mine” this evening at a special showing in Saint John, NB. I found the film to be very moving and beautifully filmed. There were many moments that brought tears to my eyes. This is a wonderful film and I look forward to seeing it again in theatrical release in May.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Paul Berry from St. Martins, NB on April 3, 2013 at 8:57 pm

  273. Drove buy property today, stopped and backed up and sat for a few minutes, did not know anything about it until i got home and googled it. What a neat piece of history and a beautiful place, I wonder who owns it now.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    ted crow on April 5, 2013 at 9:12 pm

  274. Dear Neighbour,
    I’m new here. I came with the passion for an experiment in Living with Less: A Richer Life. That’s the book that will be one of the results. My work as an artist is nearly exclusively focusing on the recycling work, which serves me well as a metaphor for our personal waste in my counselling practice. Lately, I have been immersing myself in a “growing” movement called “occupy gardens for world peas”. Public space = public food is the idea. My partner and I have been investigating this transplantable idea and chickens play a part. I guess my thinking is that it ought to be a constitutional right for someone to secure a protein source for themselves and their family. Big business and the smaller corporations they own called governments have been getting pretty heavy handed. I rejoice in finding kindred spirits in the pages, in the sheds and in the shadows. Thanks, Mr. Needles.

    Lianne Snow, The Recycling Queen

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Lianne Snow from Canada on April 8, 2013 at 9:18 am

  275. Loved this article. I would like to give a little insight on Ontario Chicken Farmers. Every Chicken farm in Ontario is owned and operated by independent families. Canada has a quota supply management. This means that chicken farmers control the amount of chicken being produced in Ontario. If this system ceases to exist there would be no quality control and every independent chicken farm would go bankrupt. Ontario Chicken farmers are consisted the cleanest in the world. Hormones of any kind were banned in Canada in 1978. Supply Management also keeps the cost of chicken low. You pay more for Chicken in the US and they use hormones in the feed. It takes 6 to 8 weeks to grow a bird in Canada and 3 to 6 weeks in the US. Big corporations like Tyson own most if the farms in the US and they hire farm managers. I am very proud of the fact that I have been an Ontario Chicken Farmer for over 20 years.
    Sonya Vannetten , past Ontario Chicken Farmer

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Sonya Vannetten from Port Perry On on April 8, 2013 at 9:38 am

    • In response to Sonya, yes you are right about supply management being important, but it does NOT keep the cost of chicken low, it does the opposite. Just like dairy (also on the quota system), chicken in Canada is more expensive than in the US because we don’t flood the market with supply. A simple supply-demand curve will show how increased supply with stable demand lowers price. This is why dairy farms in Canada tend to max out around 500 head, while in the US 5000 head is common. Basically, without supply management, a farmer must produce more product to make the same amount or money. If the pork industry had supply management, they wouldn’t have face the problems they have over the past decade. In addition, supply management does not control quality.
      Great point about the independent families; farms are just that, small family-run businesses. Although there are some corporate farms, many farm families have sales contracts with corporate buyers to secure sale/income.

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Tara Walsh from Guelph on September 24, 2013 at 2:09 pm

  276. Great information on the finches. I love these birds they are my favorite. Susan

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    susanwever from Asheville, NC on April 8, 2013 at 6:24 pm

  277. These pictures are wonderful. I would love to contact her and purchase one of her pictures.
    Would I please be able to obtain an avenue to reach her to have a look at all of her painting.
    Great talent!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Shirley Love from Orangeville, ON on April 9, 2013 at 1:17 am

  278. Just discovered your site —love it

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    noreen from Goderich on April 9, 2013 at 4:32 pm

    • And I just discovered your kind comment Noreen! Great to hear from a reader in Huron County – a very bio-diverse part of Ontario. I hope you have plenty of fine adventures in nature this summer.

      Don

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Don Scallen on May 29, 2013 at 8:16 pm

  279. I had a feeling there would be something about Christine in the spring In The Hills. What a beautifully written tribute. We (my husband Tony and I) met Christine and Wendall over 15 years ago when the boys were go-karting out of the Simcoe Kart Club; and I had the honour and good fortune to have been her friend for all these years. If not for her I wouldn’t have found the Harry Potter books. She came to my door many years ago with a “here, you’ve got to read this.” And, again without her I wouldn’t have found my true guilty pleasure passion, Edward Cullen (Twilight series). I treasure the times we had together; hiking with the dogs, movies, and sharing our “unique” sense of humour with each other. I miss you terribly dear one and especially your smile.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Lois Welch on April 9, 2013 at 4:43 pm

  280. Beautiful work! Great to see local artists being supported. Way to go In the Hills!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Meaghan U on April 9, 2013 at 8:02 pm

  281. To the Ontario Sand and Gravel Association and the Provincial government-if, in the words of Maureen Miller of the OSGA, ” There is definitely a supply shortage coming. There’s no question.”, while you are changing the legislation to put Food and Water FIRST, then change the legislation so that what aggregate you mine in Ontario, STAYS in Ontario. That should help your supposed supply crunch. And OSGA, prove your supply crunch statement. Get a website up and going showing all active pits in Ontario and how many tonnes each mines every year. AND while you are at it, add to that website all the unrehabilitated pits that are out there.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ken Phillips from Melancthon on April 10, 2013 at 8:35 am

  282. Hi Don:

    Yes, it is good to see the story from a non-headline viewpoint. I too have seen coyotes out our way, and have never had them approach me, even though I normally walk alone. My experience is that they are very wary indeed of humans. We hear them at night as well, and it sounds as though there are a lot of them around our place (100 miles or so east of Toronto).

    It seems to me that it is more the coyotes than the humans who are the victims in the current situation. We have ruined their environment in North America, and now that they are forced into contact with us, against their natural instincts, we want to kill them off to protect ourselves.

    I know that if I were a sheep farmer I could not afford to see this larger historical picture, but this picture is true non-the-less. No matter how we proceed in dealing with the presence of these animals in our lives, we must keep this historical view in mind, and be fair to these creatures of (slightly) less intelligence than ourselves.

    Many thanx for the article, Don. I only wish it would make the national news, as do all the fear creating stories we see and hear in commercial media.

    Brian Naulls.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    brian naulls from grafton ontario on April 10, 2013 at 2:53 pm

  283. Another well composed piece by Shuff, obviously the result of considerable and long reflection. Quite a bit of research, too. Informative, convincing and beautiful prose. So when’s the book coming out? This is the greatest David and Goliath story I’ve encountered in quite some time.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Carl Michener from Alliston on April 10, 2013 at 9:49 pm

  284. Wonderful work. The landscape piece is breathtaking.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Pam Purves from Caledon on April 11, 2013 at 10:18 am

  285. Lovely to meet everyone virtually. A great team for a great magazine. Congratulations.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Pam Purves on April 11, 2013 at 10:21 am

  286. Shuff’s well documented piece on the battle of ‘corporation versus the people’, was balanced, informative and clearly not over. The silent majority are finally speaking up and taking a stand, it’s ‘Food and Water First’, since somebody has to speak up for Mother Nature, we ‘Idle No More’.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    susan worts from Toronto on April 11, 2013 at 10:24 am

  287. Dear Shirley,
    Thank so much for your very positive review of my work. It was certainly a pleasure having spoken with you.
    All the best,
    Ellen

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ellen Cameron from Hockley Valley on April 11, 2013 at 9:27 pm

  288. Hello Meaghan,
    Thank you so much for your support of local artists. As an equestrian photographer living and working in the area, it is very much appreciated.
    Cheers
    Ellen

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ellen Cameron from Hockley Valley on April 11, 2013 at 9:33 pm

  289. Dear Pam,
    I very much appreciate your response to my work, especially “Bound for Glory”. It was a pleasure working with that particular equine partner as we both did a lot of running that day. She was a co-operative and delightful subject.
    Thank you,
    Ellen

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ellen Cameron from Hockley Valley on April 11, 2013 at 9:44 pm

  290. Would love to have a connection with someone from our Great Aunt Lula’s family.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Evelyn Beam Grant Baker from rush, ny on April 12, 2013 at 12:15 pm

  291. Just finished reading Ulster Bound in your magazine, and I feel I should make a correction. I was born and raised in Northern Ireland, and would like to point that no part of Ulster is in the Republic of Ireland. Ireland has 32 counties, 6 of which are in Northern Ireland, which, unfortunately, still belongs to England. The other 26 counties form the Republic of Ireland. Absolutely, no part of Ulster is in the South of Ireland. Just wanted to make that correction, so you can pass it on to Liz Beatty, as she was exploring her Irish roots, she may want to know.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    una schaefer on April 13, 2013 at 4:28 pm

    • Thanks for reading my story Una.

      Responding to your comment — I think a common use of the name “Ulster” might be confusing things here.

      I understand some Northern Irish call the six counties of Northern Ireland Ulster — probably in part to emphasize this British-ruled state as distinct and separate from the Republic of Ireland. However, the province of Ulster (indeed comprising Northern Ireland and three counties now in the Republic) reaches back long before the partitioning of Northern Ireland in the early 1920s.

      The word “Ulster” translates as “Land of the Ulaidh” — the ancient Kings and their people that ruled over most of the north of Ireland before the Norman invasion.

      Ulster is one of four such ancient provinces of Ireland (actually, there used to be five before two merged), the others being Leinster, Munster and Connacht. When Ireland was partitioned in the early 1920s, Ulster’s nine counties were allowed to vote on whether to join the Irish Free State or remain in the United Kingdom. Three Ulster counties — Donegal, Monaghan and Cavan — voted for the Irish Free State. The others — Fermanagh, Armagh, Tyrone, Londonderry, Antrim and Down — voted for the UK. These latter six now form Northern Ireland, but the full nine together still make up the province of Ulster.

      And although the region has no political standing, ties to the “Land of the Ulaidh” still run deep for many in both its six Northern Irish and three Republic of Ireland counties.

      I found tons of great sources teasing apart this rich (and complicated) history. The Ulster wiki page was a great starting point, but since I’m having trouble embedding live links here, I’ll just list them all here:

      http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/613323/Ulster
      http://www.historyfromheadstones.com/index.php?maps
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulster
      http://www.mccaskie.org.uk/Plantation.htm
      http://goireland.about.com/od/belfastandulster/p/ulster.htm
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provinces_of_Ireland

      Hope this help clarifies things, Liz

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Liz Beatty from Caledon on April 14, 2013 at 1:50 pm

  292. This website provides a good overview of the aggregate industry in Ontario. http://www.theholestory.ca

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Dan Horton on April 15, 2013 at 12:44 pm

  293. I had a horrible experience with my Red Polls these past couple of months. I had about 20 who died. They lost their ability to fly, had eye problems. I was told that it could have been salmonella. It was so sad to see them perish like that. We seem to be ok now. Did anyone else have this problem? Thanks, Loni.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Loni from Orangeville on April 16, 2013 at 4:37 pm

  294. Thank you for this informative and well-balanced article. It is frustrating and tiresome to read so many negative opinions about the inaccurately and unfairly maligned coyote. It is stunning that so many people actually choose to live in ignorance and to perpetuate fear among others. I’ll be happy to pass this article along in hopes that it would instill understanding and compassion for coyotes in those who have not yet fallen prey to misinformation about this amazing animal.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Gail Clark from Northeastern U.S. on April 17, 2013 at 4:11 pm

  295. Thanks for save the Nature, all the Animals in the Earth are Angels for the Human beings.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Candy Hernandez from Oaxaca, Mx on April 17, 2013 at 7:17 pm

  296. Don,
    Your final literary creation was well worth the wait! Thank you for celebrating the magnificent coyote in such a kind and compassionate delivery. Having spent so many years dispelling the “myth information”, about our native Song Dogs, I do thank you for a brilliant, refreshingly balanced and uplifting article. To truly know these creatures in all of their mystery, intelligence and beauty, one just has to be open to the possibilities of inspiration, devotion and perseverance…In the likeness of Coyote. Cheers!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Lesley Sampson~ Co founder Coyote Watch Canada from Southern Ontario on April 17, 2013 at 8:49 pm

  297. Ellen, you have captured beautifully the mystique of horses…

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Terry Woo on April 21, 2013 at 7:18 pm

  298. The red trillium is one of my favourite spring flowers, but I never grow tired of the trout lily. Another beauty that I enjoy is the marsh marigold, which splashes bright yellow on riverbanks and marshes.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Doug Colter from Brampton on April 22, 2013 at 12:42 pm

  299. On occasion I look back over the www and I wonder who may be looking for info about my parents “Nurse and Angus” and not be able to get what they are looking for. My memory is still good even though I am getting along in years. Mom and Dad (Nurse and Angus) had ten years of service to the public before I would remember. The next ten years were all part of my life as a child, not different from the life of other children. Now that I have written material just to give information, not to earn a living, my reminiscing, my memoirs awakens me to the life that people of today may not understand, appreciate or even believe. I was the one and only son of Nurse and Angus. They had two daughters who went to live in BC and Ontario. I do not profess to be an author so my written material may never get before the viewing public. I appreciate the effort of those professionals who have tried to tell the story of “Nurse and Angus”. I feel the whole story can never be written, it is a true to life story of unselfish giving. My parents gave thanks for the good health, fortitude, perserverance and ability to serve, to try fill an incredible need. My father died 1993, his home and clinic fell to me in his will, I transferred owner ship to the community. At 86 years I may not be able to see financing for its survival much longer. There is a great humane history story inside its walls. I fear for the future success of the ongoing legacy story available to our younger people who may benefit. My parents were ordinary working people. The committee “caretakers” of their home and clinic have difficulty finding enough finances to keep paint on the walls. My parents gave of themselves “freely” for ten years. 1934 Mom went on salary as a nurse for the long isolated district, her pay? $250.00 a year. Her husband Angus, provided transportation “free”. She had chosen a good partner, mentor and bread winner when she left the comfort of a London Hospital and took up the challenge of providing medical help to a sick and forlorne part of isolated Newfoundland 1921.
    Thank you for your attention. Trevor Bennett

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    TEVOR BENNETT from Irishtown Bay of Islands NL on April 27, 2013 at 8:31 pm

  300. Great pictures. Glad Jennifer sent these on to me.
    Would love to see more.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Bob Porter from London, Ont. on April 29, 2013 at 10:22 am

    • Bob,
      Thank you Bob. As far back as I can remember…even before University days I longed to be working with horses. I feel very grateful that now I have the opportunity to combine my Fine Art training with my equestrian life in Hockley Valley.
      Take care,
      Ellen

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Ellen Cameron on May 5, 2013 at 10:41 am

  301. A Palgrave Forest walk yesterday revealed a rich panoply of newly blooming early Spring flowers at a later-than-usual date – Hepatica, Spring Beauty, Blue Cohosh, Bloodroot, and Coltsfoot in flower and Trout Lily and White Trillium with flower buds. Marvellous colour after a drab early Spring

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ian Anderson from Cedar Mills on April 29, 2013 at 2:32 pm

  302. One amazing life long influence. Thank you.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Birgit Hansen on May 4, 2013 at 10:38 pm

  303. Good Morning Terry,
    Thank you so much for your appreciation of my images. The opportunity to photograph these incredible creatures is a passion and a pleasure!
    All the best,
    Ellen

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ellen Cameron from Hocklely Valley, Ontrario on May 5, 2013 at 10:26 am

  304. I have a water colour of the Mono Centre General Store the sign on the front reads E Tate Proprietor and is signed by what looks like LJ Brown. Does any one know anything about this? Holly Knowlton

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Holly Knowlton from Alliston Ont on May 5, 2013 at 8:07 pm

  305. We also drove past this site on May/11/13 Thought it may be an inn or restaurant . Anyone know?

    Thanks

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Frank O'Gorman on May 12, 2013 at 10:52 am

  306. It has been 2 years since this publication, however, as a resident of Brampton and healthcare innovation consultant, I am so proud of Drs Stephen and Stephanie Milone for their contribution. These are passionate physicians, who in their day to day work contribute immensely to ‘healthcare’ in a variety of ways while raising a young family.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    ROHAN NATHAN from Brampton, Ontario on May 25, 2013 at 1:41 pm

  307. I saw this recipe and had to try it. It’s easy, quick, and wonderfully moist. I have made it several times now, and it’s been a hit every time!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Janet Dimond from Orangeville on May 29, 2013 at 8:49 pm

    • tried it—it’s good, but not in the top banana bread recipes I have tried. Missing the uber “banana-y” flavour.

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Amber from Orangeville on July 31, 2013 at 8:58 pm

  308. Arden’s vinetarta is so delicious you will eat it everyday with your coffee or a snack instead of unhealthy sweet buns , chelsea buns etc. Try it today!!!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ann Fenton from Canada on June 3, 2013 at 2:20 am

  309. I love love the local flavour, with so many groups working together I can sample a bit of everything local on one weekend!
    Looking forward to attending this year!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Julie on June 7, 2013 at 9:21 am

  310. Creemore Farmers’ Market were lucky enough to have Caesar and Sam at the market a few times last year. Although I am a baker, I don’t really have a sweet tooth. I was lucky enough to have the stall next door when Caesar made doughnuts fresh at the market. What a treat! I have to confess I had four (roughly one an hour) I can’t wait to go along to Creemore Kitchen after the market is done on Saturday to get a doughnut to take home. Mind you, knowing Caesar’s talents they won’t be the only thing I buy before I leave!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    sarah hallett from Mansfield on June 7, 2013 at 9:35 am

  311. Great Recipe. I barbequed the pork and made the sauce with a tsp of butter in the pan and added some rosemary. It was a hit.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Martha on June 16, 2013 at 11:43 am

  312. Hi Don,

    How sad to lose a treasure such as this! It sounds as if Caledon has a good idea – let’s hope that it helps save some special trees. Why can’t other municipalities adopt a similar program?

    You ask for favourites; I have a number, also elms. They are beside Highway #6 on the way to the Bruce Peninsula – several just north of Durham and a couple others about half way between Hepworth and Wiarton.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Read Whatmough from Georgetown ON on June 17, 2013 at 6:04 pm

  313. Made this with the rhubarb compote for a wild game bbq. Needless to say it was gone in moments and next day I had numerous requests for the recipe. I was initially worried about the cheesecake as rose about 2 inches above the 9 inch springform pan and needed some extra time to be backed in the middle…but no need to worry as it turned out great. Will definitely make it for future special events.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    sheena ewen from kitchener, ontario on June 17, 2013 at 6:58 pm

  314. The only change I made was to substitute maple syrup for the sugar.
    This recipe is simple and delicious. We are going to serve it in The Lodge at Pine Cove dining room next.
    Nicola Ross

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Nicola Ross from French River, Ontario on June 18, 2013 at 8:47 am

  315. Laughed out loud more than once to this story. I have so been there, done that. Thanks so much for a wonderful contribution.

    Jeff

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Jeff Rollings on June 19, 2013 at 8:40 pm

  316. Great story, Laurie. You better get over to the optometrist and update your glasses so you can read the impossibly small print on the food labels. That goes for pet food and people food!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Valerie on June 19, 2013 at 8:43 pm

  317. Thanks so much for your kind comments, Jeff and Valerie. I am so excited to be a part of IN THE HILLS!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Laurie May on June 19, 2013 at 9:14 pm

  318. You had me! Lots of those things have happened to me too. But it is so much funnier when you point them out. Want to hear more from you.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Norma Gee on June 20, 2013 at 9:44 am

    • Thanks MOM!!!!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on June 20, 2013 at 3:49 pm

  319. We’re probably at the same vet!! Any chance you also have trouble with Rogers Technical support?

    Great blog. Look forward what;s next.

    Arlene

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    arlene noble from Canada on June 20, 2013 at 12:39 pm

  320. Loved your story Laurie and can identify with it completely! I forgot my prescription list on a visit to a new doctor and they actually expect you to remember those long, unpronounceable names and not just say well one is for___ and one is for___!
    Keep writing!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Gail Smith on June 20, 2013 at 2:03 pm

  321. I could actually see the converstation with the vet unfolding as I read it! I was chuckling and nodding along the whole time. Thanks for making the ordinary something to laugh at. Looking forward to your next blog.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Diane on June 20, 2013 at 4:56 pm

  322. Laurie I love your blog! I so giggled and life is just that life, if we can’t laugh and see the funnier side to things life would be very dull! I soo look forward to hearing more from you! Great job!!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Chrysty Newman from Ayr on June 20, 2013 at 9:59 pm

  323. Laurie! Too funny! My technique to combating guilters is to smile and nod but it doesn’t always work LOL

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Amanda McGarry from Orangeville on June 23, 2013 at 10:11 pm

  324. I saw the movie tonight. Very touching performances by both Cromwell and Bujold. My dad died last summer and had dementia in his final months. Bujold’s portrayal of the loss of presence interspersed with moments of clarity is very moving.
    I have to admit that the way the codes are used to attck this brave man made me furious but his speech to the judge was wonderful.
    Highly recommended.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Robert O from Canada on June 24, 2013 at 3:00 am

  325. Great article that captures the beauty and spirit of this wonderful country home. I enjoyed the human element interspersed with the architectural features as the home owners personalities were brought to life in the overview.

    Well done!
    Stephen Laufer

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Stephen Laufer from Toronto on June 24, 2013 at 3:51 pm

  326. Caffeine is an alkaloid. For caffeine to burn away during roasting, beans would have to reach an internal temperature
    of 1500 degrees. French roast is one of the darkest on the Agtron scale and roasts around 415-420 degress. Beans would be
    ash if we were to roast them until caffeine started depleting. I’ll have to disagree with the “lighter bean” argument as well.
    Bad beans are roasted dark to mask any defects, really good green will yield beautiful light roast profiles that are elegant,
    refined, full of sweetness and pleasant acidity.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Chris on June 27, 2013 at 9:45 am

  327. Hi Ken,
    Love your page in the magazine, however, the dictionary puzzle only provided 7 spaces for the correct 8 letter answer ~ implicit!
    Doh!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Dan Hussey from Caledon East on June 27, 2013 at 11:24 am

    • Hi Dan, Good catch and thanks for bringing that to our attention. We’ll get it fixed online ASAP.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Valerie on June 27, 2013 at 11:44 am

  328. I’m working on an outdoor exhibit about our forest at Montshire Museum of Science and need a photo of a healthy, wormless forest floor (ours is not quite as bad as yours, Chris, but it’s pretty bad.) The one in this article would be perfect. Can someone tell me how to contact the photographer?
    Joan Waltermire
    Exhibit Developer
    Montshire Museum of Science
    Norwich, Vermont

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    joan waltermire on July 2, 2013 at 11:55 am

  329. What a great article aboout the CNE. It brings back so many memories. I grew up in Toronto in the 1950′s and I still love the CNE and attend each year without fail. When we were small we also loved the free food samples that were given away and the free book covers and rulers for school. As a small child, I always wished I could enter something there to win a ribbon or a prize. When I viewed the quilts and artwork in the buildings there, I often vowed to find out how to enter for next year. This never did happen. When we moved to Bolton in the 1980′s I discovered the Bolton Fall Fair. Here was a place where anyone could enter and there were so many catergories to choose from: photographs, art, baking, sewing, woodworking, antiques, chickens and goats, and a huge variety of vegetables and flowers – whatever your interest might be – there were so many categories listed in the fair booklet each year. I do still love the CNE and all it’s grandeur (I love the parades, the exhibits, and the atmosphere) but the Bolton Fall Fair gives me a chance to take part, volunteer, and hopefully win a prize. I wouldn’t miss this opportunity for the world.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Diana from Bolton on July 2, 2013 at 1:51 pm

  330. Hi Don
    Reading your story of the green frogs feeding atop a bloated beaver carcass in a roadside ditch is quite fascinating, so I thought I would share a story equally so. I was hiking along a roadside in the Kolopore Uplands where there was a stream along side of the road. Always curious to see what is floating along, I must have scared a little mouse from the meadow to the side of the ditch/stream. That green frog did not hesitate to pounce on that mouse. I felt privileged to see such an act of nature, but at the same time, it was very disconcerning to see a mouse squealing for its life, as the frog eventually swallowed it up whole. It took him a few gulps to do so, and I even believe he “bit off more than he could chew” The mouse eventually gave up the fight, but probably because it suffocated with it being head first in the frogs mouth. The frog just sat there, with a little bit of the mouse’s feet sticking out as well as the end of its tail poking out of its mouth. I had my camera with me and was able to fire off a couple of shots of the whole ordeal. Its not something I will forget any time soon, that’s for sure!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Pamela on July 5, 2013 at 6:34 pm

    • Thanks for this observation Pamela!

      I’ve seen pictures of larger frogs swallowing mice, but not a green frog. It doesn’t surprise me though – if a prey animal can fit in a frog’s mouth, it is fair game. Thank you for this and have a fine summer exploring nature!

      Don

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Don Scallen on July 7, 2013 at 5:53 pm

  331. We will miss Doug’s fabulous column, snippets from around the world, so relevant to all our lives. Our condolences to Signe and all your family.
    One of my personal favouites – A great reflection on a brilliant mind and the wonderful gentle person that was Doug.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Alison Hird from Caledon on July 12, 2013 at 12:24 am

  332. I never met Doug, but I want to give my condolences to his family. I am very sorry for your loss and may he live in your memories and hearts for ever.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    pia wiesen on July 12, 2013 at 2:27 am

  333. The few times my family had the pleasure of meeting Doug, was at their home in the countryside. He wore a wonderful, pleasant smile and had a wonderful demeanour….always. A person that was living the life he loved. Deeply sorry for your loss.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Shelagh Armstrong on July 12, 2013 at 12:24 pm

  334. Everything Liz wrote about Rob it true except one thing. He won’t kill you, because he will never divulge a spot!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    JanN from Alert NU on July 13, 2013 at 12:40 am

  335. Dear Tralee: You wrote a beautiful tribute to your father. I never had the opportunity to meet him, though after reading your stories and hearing so much about him, it is clear that he was a very special man. You are all very fortunate to have known and loved him…..and to have been loved by him.
    My condolences to Signe and all of your family.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Laurie May from Mono on July 13, 2013 at 7:16 pm

  336. Hi to Honey & Family

    Just a note to let you know how much I am enjoying your wonderful “HONEY”.
    We returned from Geneseo Monday morning. The drive was not as hectic as on
    the week’end.
    Austin spoke at the Survivor’s supper after the show. He advised that the week-end
    was the most successful we had ever had financially. We all worked hard, but it
    was people like you and all the flyer’s and friends to make the Show.

    Again your Honey is the sweetest, Wildflower my favourite. It is a pleasure each year to
    welcome you to the air strip, looking forward to seeing you (and maybe some of your family)
    next year. God Willing

    sincerely

    Pat Drummond

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Pat Drummond (reigstrar of Pilot's ) from Brantford, Ontario on July 16, 2013 at 3:38 pm

  337. Hi Laurie, your picture makes me think of all the times you came to our house for visits, you look very pretty, and have not changed. Moe and I loved your article too, best of luck and look forward to reading more next time I’m up.
    Love Mrs. Malone and Daughter Moe

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Mrs. Malone on July 19, 2013 at 6:15 pm

  338. Well thank-you very much Mrs. Malone and Daughter Moe. I appreciate your compliments. I must admit that I love the photograph that appeared in In The Hills magazine too. The photo was taken by local photographer Rosemary Hasner. My next blog entry is about the experience of having my picture taken. Stay tuned.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Laurie May on July 19, 2013 at 11:36 pm

  339. I tried all those hints as I read them here; not one of them felt comfortable. The best pictures seem to come when you feel genuinely happy. Great picture by the way.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Deb V from Orangeville, ON on July 24, 2013 at 1:18 pm

    • Thanks, Deb! I think you are right—I would say that I’m a pretty happy person 90% of the time—but 10% of the time—Look out!!!!!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on July 25, 2013 at 9:23 pm

  340. Laurie, the photo is fabulous and the story is hilarious. I can just see poor Rose trying to caputure you between moves. If you do become a model, perhaps hand modelling would be less stressful. Diane.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Diane on July 24, 2013 at 2:00 pm

    • Diane: What a great idea! I did some research—do you know that a good hand model can make $300.00 an hour??!!!!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on July 25, 2013 at 10:30 pm

  341. Many of this artist’s beautiful paintings grace the walls of our B & B in Niagara-on-the-Lake. She gets rave reviews from visitors from all over the world who enjoy both her watercolours and acrylic landscapes. Beautiful work!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Maddie Whitfield from Niagara-on-the-Lake on August 7, 2013 at 9:33 am

  342. I have a question for you. Did Steen’s dairy ever package milk or cream in a glass bottle? I have been looking for one for years and have never run across any.

    Thank you for your time
    Brenda Steen

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Brenda Steen from Peterborough, Ontario on August 15, 2013 at 9:31 pm

  343. Bless you, bee keepers! Your work is a legacy of goodness within the community, and for it. Cheers from Barrie (where I buy Hockley Honey at the Local Food Market) Eric

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 1.0/5 (1 vote cast)

    Eric Lehner from Barrie on August 16, 2013 at 8:10 pm

  344. We used to say “salt of the earth” to describe fine people. Let’s update that to “Honey of the earth” to describe people who do so much for us – dedicated organic bee keepers. Wow – a terrific contribution to our well being. Cheers, Eric Lehner

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Eric Lehner from Barrie on August 16, 2013 at 8:17 pm

  345. Are the san marzano tomatoes available now and if so what is the price per bushel.I am looking for 12 bushels picked.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Lio Di Bratto on August 19, 2013 at 10:26 pm

    • Hi Lio – Please contact Van Dyken Bros. direct by phone: 905-857-3561

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      valerie on August 20, 2013 at 9:17 am

  346. To see more of Ellen’s photos, please go to her website at http://www.ellencameron.com/

    Tracy.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Tracy Synnott from Canada on August 22, 2013 at 9:43 am

  347. Watched a Giant Swallowtail lay eggs on Rue in my yard today. Collected five. Seems rather late but an aquaintance saw a female due the same at her house yesterday. Anyone know if the eggs over winter. Also found three small GS larvae while collecting the eggs.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Paul Gross from Kitchener on September 6, 2013 at 5:49 pm

  348. Good to hear from you Paul. The giants are active right now – I saw several last weekend as I hiked through a woodland near Campbellville. Caterpillars were numberous on prickly ash. Yes it is late for the egg laying. Being a predominantly southern species, the giants continue breeding into late summer – this wouldn’t be a problem in Missouri, but it certainly is here. (I suspect as well that the cold, rainy summer has slowed the giant swallowtail breeding cycle which is why we’re seeing so many eggs and larvae now.)

    Regardless, caterpillars hatching from eggs laid now will likely not survive long enough to create chrysalides (this is how swallowtails overwinter – not as eggs)

    Rearing the caterpillars yourself is easy (as long as their food plant is available) In my experience the chrysalides perish if placed outdoors unprotected. They do overwinter successfully in heated garages – probably best to mist them occasionally. I will try placing my giant chrysalides near the ground this year, protected by leaves and by a wire mesh cover to deter predation, and see if that works.

    cheers,

    Don

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Don Scallen on September 7, 2013 at 1:35 pm

  349. Great post, Laurie May! I’ve struggled with choosing blog names in the past… But as you say, when the right name comes along, it just clicks! I’ll be looking for your blue docs around town!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Gillian on September 10, 2013 at 6:37 am

    • Thanks Gillian—If you see me, come and say hello!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May from Mono on September 10, 2013 at 5:29 pm

  350. WHERE DID YOU GET THIS TALENT?? I enjoyed every word in your blog. I think you have hit your nitche and you did it all by yourself.
    Could I share your blogs with my friends??? I can’t wait until I read the next blog.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Norma Gee from Collingwoo on September 10, 2013 at 11:34 am

    • Thanks Mom!!! Yes–feel free to share the blog. Pass it on!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on September 10, 2013 at 5:34 pm

  351. What a catchy name Laurie. I enjoyed reading the evolution to your final brilliant decision. Good luck with your blog!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Kris Purc on September 10, 2013 at 12:09 pm

    • I’m glad that you enjoyed reading my blog, Kris. I love the word “evolution”. I could have used that in my story!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on September 10, 2013 at 5:37 pm

  352. If your boots could talk they wouldn’t be talking in Mono, they’d be talking in stereo. A cute discourse. If I’m in Mono I’ll be looking for “Blue Boots”, hope it rains a lot.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Danno from between Utopia and Haeven on September 10, 2013 at 12:42 pm

    • Hi back to you, Danno: I love that visual of the two boots “talking in stereo”. Thanks!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on September 10, 2013 at 5:39 pm

  353. A very interesting story. I am not familiar with blogs but if this is an example of one then I am all for them. Good work relating to your students in that way. I am sure it is something they will remeber all their lives. As teachers we are not always aware of the impact we have on young lives. I am many years retired but I know that if I were to do it all again i would be a much better teacher having seen what my grandchildren go through. I have a grand daughter just entering grade four. She is most mature and reads 500 page books I would hesitate to attack, yet her new teacher gave directions that students must read and record 12 pages of reading per night! I suggested he just take in the several books’ names she reads each week but no she has to do as the teacher advises. Have fun. I enjoyed teaching grade four the most. Barbara D

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Barbara Distin from Collingwood on September 10, 2013 at 12:55 pm

    • Hi Barbara: Thanks for your kind comments. Your granddaughter is very lucky to have “the love of reading”. Teachers have all kinds of tools and tricks to encourage reading–but if she has a natural love of books–she is very fortunate–and nothing will hold her back. She will likely also enjoy writing. Good readers often love to write as well.

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on September 10, 2013 at 5:44 pm

  354. What a story-teller you are! Perfect blog name and I look forward to”life as Laurie sees it” in the next edition.
    I imagine too that life in the hills will have a lot in common with other rural towns – I’m sure we will smile, laugh out loud and nod in agreement with your stories, even though we don’t live in Mono. Great post!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Deb Mobbs from Collingwood & Clarksburg, ON on September 10, 2013 at 1:00 pm

    • Hi Deb: Thanks for taking the time to comment on my blog. You would love it here. The Hills are a great place to live—and a great place to visit. Actually—”Life as Laurie Sees It” would have been a cool blog name as well. I needed you a few months ago when I was trying to think up a name!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on September 10, 2013 at 5:48 pm

  355. Laurie. Great blog. I like your humour in all your blogs but this one had me laughing out loud.
    30 years ago we didn’t have any automatic generators when I was naming my company. But there were lots of brain storming, quirky questions and word lists.
    After weeks of this it came to me in a flash and sat there for a couple of days until I acknowledge that this was the right name for my company.
    It’s funny how even with all our technology the creative process is still left I the hands of your imagination.
    Keep writing.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Janet Wilcox from Markham, On on September 10, 2013 at 2:04 pm

    • Thanks for sharing your story Janet. I absolutely love your line: ” It’s funny how even with all our technology the creative process is still left I the hands of your imagination.” How true!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on September 10, 2013 at 5:50 pm

      • O.K. Janet—I just realized that we both made the exact same typo in the middle of the sentence. But we know what we mean—don’t we?

        VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
        Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

        Laurie May on September 10, 2013 at 5:58 pm

  356. These boots were made for walking, talking, gawking, hawking, flaunting, kicking and whatever!! Kudos for another must-read Blog.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Larry Gee from Collimgwood - The Town above Mono! on September 10, 2013 at 4:23 pm

    • Thanks Dad!!! Yep—”these boots are made for walking”–just like the song.
      Maybe I need a theme song????

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on September 11, 2013 at 11:36 am

  357. Great!!! I especially liked the part about waiting for the whisperings in your ear from an “Ancient Indian Spirit” That had me.

    Till we meet again.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    M. Malone on September 10, 2013 at 5:15 pm

    • Thank-you, M. Malone. Apparently the ancient spirits have been known to whisper– but personally I’ve never heard them. Thanks for being such a great fan!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on September 10, 2013 at 9:54 pm

  358. Love the blog. Keep up the great writing!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ryan from Canada on September 10, 2013 at 5:48 pm

    • Ryan from Canada: I’ll keep on writing–keep on following my blog. Thanks!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on September 10, 2013 at 9:56 pm

  359. Thanks Dad!!! Yep—”these boots are made for walking”–just like the song.
    Maybe I need a theme song????

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Laurie May on September 10, 2013 at 5:56 pm

  360. I really enjoyed your blog! Glad your mother pointed me in the right direction. I love writing too but have never done a blog – only some little stories for our community paper. Keep writing Laurie and let your talent soar!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Gail Smith from Freelton, Ontario on September 10, 2013 at 8:07 pm

    • Hi Gail: Writing “little stories” is a perfect way to share your ideas and thoughts with your community. If you can do that–you would enjoy blogging too! I think you should give it a try. I appreciate your kind words.

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on September 10, 2013 at 10:00 pm

  361. I have not seen the moth, but Last year I saw the caterpillar in Buckhorn Ontario at my sister’s farm. The caterpillar is scary but the moth is beautiful.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Amanda from Buckhorn Ontario on September 11, 2013 at 10:30 am

  362. Cute and clever blog but could be shorter.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Connie Atkinson from Collingwood on September 11, 2013 at 10:33 am

    • Hi Connie: You are right. I will try harder to shorten these blog entries. I know that most people have very limited time these days—I have to learn how to keep it “short and sweet”. Another idea is to divide a long entry into several shorter entries. Thanks for your comment.

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on September 11, 2013 at 11:35 am

  363. Great story. If only those Two Blue Boots could talk! I am sure they would have many interesting stories to tell! Diane

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Diane on September 11, 2013 at 1:34 pm

    • Yes, Diane–you are right. The first time I wore those boots was when I attended the rodeo at the Orangeveville Fall Fair a few years ago. I came home and I had to scrape out the hay and horse poop from the bottoms. I wonder what my boots would have had to say about that?!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on September 12, 2013 at 11:26 am

  364. Nice job Laurie! Congrats from Essex County all the way to “the hills”. What more can you ask for – humour, style & adventure all in one cousin :) Wishing you all the best with your newfound talent.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Troy Gee from Leamington on September 11, 2013 at 6:03 pm

    • Thanks, Troy! It’s great to hear from you. I’m glad the blog made its way to Essex County. Say hello to the gang for me.

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on September 12, 2013 at 11:29 am

  365. Laurie: My first comment has seemed to have disappeared so I’ll try again. Enjoyed your column. We have something in common that we both enjoy writing about nothing . As a former teacher myself perhaps we both have learned to say a lot about nothing.
    My editor only gives me 600 words to say my piece so it limits my going on too long. Thank Dad for linking me into your blog. Have fun with it. Kent.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Kent Walton from Blue Mountains on September 12, 2013 at 11:14 am

  366. As I was reading this article, I realized this is exactly what my parents have started in Laredo, TX. They are pastors in the urban part of the city, but they have opened up a ranch in one of the outlying and poorest areas of Laredo. In this ranch, they have a garden as well as chickens and goats. They have a center and kitchen at the ranch which they have used to give the local residents classes on nutrition and gardening (http://newvisioncommunitychurch.org/2012/09/23/teaching-laredos-poor-self-sufficiency-through-farming/) I thought theirs was a great concept and I am so glad to hear that there are others doing it. I truly hope that more and more of these food hubs will multiply.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Luisa Rodriguez on September 12, 2013 at 9:43 pm

  367. Dear Signe:

    What a raw and honest tribute for a very special man. I wish that I had known Doug. I’m certain that I would have liked him. How lucky you are to have loved him.

    Laurie

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Laurie May from Mono on September 14, 2013 at 11:57 pm

  368. As in other comments on the story, I drove buy it yesterday on September 15, 2013 and found it to be quite picturesque and wonder what has become of the old mill. There is still more of the story that needs to be completed. I would love to learn more. I wanted to drive in, however I respect privacy and not sure if this is a private residence.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Randall McKeown from Mississauga on September 16, 2013 at 8:27 am

  369. Hi Kent: Ah yes….the disappearing comment! Thanks to the wisdom of Webmaster Valerie Jones–all is well now.
    Your comment about teachers “saying a lot about nothing” made me laugh. How true! It was suggested to me that 250 words per blog entry would be a good length. I just can’t seem to do it. I’ll work on it. Thanks for taking the time to write to me.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Laurie May from Mono on September 16, 2013 at 9:20 am

  370. Signe, Congrats on 20 years!!! Amazing!! Always great content and presented in a professional manner and with clarity – history, the environment and current issues! Congrats to the staff too.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Joe Grogan from Bolton Resident, 38 years on September 18, 2013 at 10:07 am

  371. What a great article!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    ruth from north van.b.c.w on September 19, 2013 at 11:16 am

  372. They are absolutely beautiful, in a way that makes you stop, relax and appreciate the beauty of the image and the life captured.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Joann Laflamme from Caledon on September 24, 2013 at 3:00 pm

  373. Haha, reminds me of my adventures on the farm and especially of one duck!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Anne-Marie Roussy from Shelburne, On on September 24, 2013 at 3:19 pm

  374. This is a great article. I just came back from a lecture given by Keith Hyde on the Avro Arrow. This article puts a human face on the story behind the technology. There were quite a few people in attendance at this lecture who either worked at Avro or had family who worked at Avro, and the feeling was very strong, a real bond with that plane.

    A few years back I met a lady whose husband worked at Avro and again this In The Hills story confirms what she said; the Arrow was not only the building a cutting edge jet, but of the building of the middle class. Many people got their productive working lives established at Avro. A great build up and then a crashing let down. Diefenbaker, C.D. Howe, the RCAF and the whole government including the Liberals, botched it. The fiasco, as we have now learned, could have been avoided.

    I’ve explored the subject through my musical, The Flying Avro Arrow, which was performed at the Toronto Fringe Festival in 2010. Amazing story!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    DOUG WARWICK from TORONTO on September 24, 2013 at 9:50 pm

  375. I am the daughter of Major Clifford McEwen mentioned in this article. I certainly had heard the name “Jimmy Welsh” when I was growing up and remember going with my parents to visit him in Orangeville when I was a child. I’m sure he was a wonderful man as was my Dad. We should be thankful every day for the sacrifices they and others made for our freedom. By the way, the nurse Dad was courting was my mother. A relative in Ontario spotted this and sent me a copy.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Mary Jane McEwen on October 1, 2013 at 1:23 pm

  376. Hi Caesar!!

    I am a big fan. I love all your recipes!! Especially the brown bread recipe you featured on City line way back.

    It was a dense bread with pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds. Can you please post it! I am so sad that this will be the first Thanksgiving with out it since I lost my recipe :(

    PLEASE!!!!
    Tina

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Tina on October 8, 2013 at 7:04 pm

  377. I knew Doug for just a year – Sept 1963 through Sept 1964, at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.
    He was by any measure an exceptional man – humor above all, then his love of motorcycles, then
    his critical intellect. In that last he was way, way sharper than average.
    In that year he became my best friend. But after he graduated from JHU we completely lost touch until recently. I still have his motorcycle – a BSA Gold Star. We each got married for the first time in 1968. I am luckier in that my wife’s still going.

    Everyone who met Doug wound up close to him – a tribute to his warm, humorous personality. I regret that so much time passed with him north of the border and me south, but at least we were able to
    trade some emails last year.

    I’m going to miss that guy. A lot.

    Robin

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Robin Kinkead from long Lake WI, USA on October 28, 2013 at 12:37 pm

  378. Thank you for answering a question of mine which came about when I read the back of an old photo of my grandfather John “Jack” Donley standing beside a vehicle wearing the same hat as the fellows in the pictures. He had a big smile on his face. Jack was a commercial traveller based out of Kitchener and he sold footwear for the E and D Shoe Company and was a representative for Bonnie Stuart children’s shoes. In the picture he was a clean shaven, fresh faced young man in his early twenties and I imagine a terrific story teller.

    Thank you for clearing up what Drummers Snack meant and bringing back great memories I have of the guy who took me to many a Kitchener Panthers, Kitchener Rangers game, who had a smile and a kind word for everybody.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    paul shelley from oshawa on November 4, 2013 at 7:48 pm

  379. Laurie………your Mom and Dad were born on Farms and lived/worked there until High School…..and yes we had lots and lots of work to do, almost 24/7. We socialized with all our neighbours, as we went to the same school, the same church and the same general store. Harvest time, too, was an annual work/social with everybody pitching in to get the crops off and stored away. Soooo, now you and Diane are having your Farm journeys…..it will enrich your lives….enjoy. Dad

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Larry Gee on November 6, 2013 at 7:20 pm

    • Yes Mom and Dad. I have heard all of those stories. Mom worked all day in the corn fields for ten cents an hour. It’s interesting that you left “country life” to head to Toronto–and your daughters left Toronto to head to the country-side. Everything comes full circle.

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May from Mono on November 6, 2013 at 11:20 pm

  380. Another interesting story. Keep them coming!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Norma Gee from Collingwood on November 6, 2013 at 7:22 pm

  381. Dear Laurie:
    You have always been my wise older sister. We have already discovered the bats that live in the barn (I say with a quivering voice hoping it isn’t really our house they live in) and the mice that live in the kitchen. The dogs have discovered burs and that they can jump into the closed swimming pool but can’t get back out. I am not yet afraid. I figure, if I can handle Toronto traffic, I can handle a few bats in the barn. Please, just don’t let them get into the house.

    You are welcome to sit on my porch anytime at all. I will join you after the farm chores are done.

    Love me.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Diane from Toronto but soon to be "The Farm" on November 6, 2013 at 9:06 pm

    • Dear Diane:

      It sounds like you are already discovering how adventurous and unpredictable rural life can be.

      By the way, you never lose an opportunity to sneak in the fact that I am the “older” sister, do you?

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May on November 6, 2013 at 11:25 pm

  382. I loved growing up in the hills. Sure we only got 1.5 television channels and the walk down the driveway could take 20 minutes on a cold day, but I would not have wanted it any other way. I am so thankful my parents took the chance moving to the area when I was young. Congratsulations and enjoy Dianne and family!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Ryan on November 6, 2013 at 11:20 pm

    • Rye Guy: I’m glad you enjoyed growing up in the country. I bet you are relieved that I didn’t tell too many embarrassing stories…..like the time that you ran down the hallway in your underwear, screaming like a girl – a black squirrel in hot pursuit. That squirrel was the same critter that your brother had reported seeing around the house on a many occasions and nobody believed him.

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May from Mono on November 8, 2013 at 12:15 am

  383. I don’t know about anyone else….but I can hardly wait for the next family get-together….someplace with lots of room to roam, cozy atmosphere, a few creatures here and there…. :)

    Congratulations! …and how do you like your banana bread; with or without chocolate chips?

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Troy from Leamington on November 7, 2013 at 8:04 am

    • Diane and I both like chocolate chips in our banana bread—lots of them!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May from Mono on November 8, 2013 at 12:21 am

  384. A great letter of adventure and advice.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Rosaleen Egan from Alliston, ON on November 7, 2013 at 8:45 am

  385. Dear Diane we lived in a small community for eight great years when our children were young and have many great memories and have made very good friends from that experience. You reminded me of the time a bird flew into the house and destroyed the living room curtains and yes we had a snake also in the house. Our next door neighbour’s barn caught on fire and I saw how helpful the community was within minutes to help. The box lunch socials along with many other gatherings (the Terra Cotta Stomp )that took place in the little community hall that was a century old structure. We met many people from the area at this little hall. This was a great part of our lives. Good luck with your new ventures.

    Mary Buchanan November 7th 2013

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Mary Buchanan from Collingwood Ontario on November 7, 2013 at 9:49 am

    • Hi Mary: Thanks for sharing your stories. I know Diane will love Country Living too!

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May from Mono on November 8, 2013 at 12:18 am

  386. Wow! I LOVE this article!! I actually got all teary reading this because we have been through very similar things. Living in the country, particularly in the beginning, is very overwhelming. But, like you, neighbours helped us along the way. Now our country home has turned into a small farm and we are now the “farmer”. I wouldn’t have it any other way! I love the bats in my attic, the mice in my walls and the chickens on my door step (well ok maybe not the bats and mice) Thank you for the article!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

    Cathy from Erin on November 7, 2013 at 4:56 pm

    • Hi Cathy: I would say that Heritage Hollow Farm is a very special “labour of love”. Your farm is beautiful. Have you thought of offering workshops for farmer-wanna-be’s?

      VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

      Laurie May from Mono on November 8, 2013 at 12:30 am

  387. Hi Rosie: Thanks. You must enjoy being a “country girl”. I love