To Deadhead Perennials or Not?

The general rule is there is no rule, remember they are all perennials and will grow back again next year.

August 20, 2015 | | Blogs | Leisure | The Flower Farm

 

Hosta look instantly better from a deadheading.

Hosta look instantly better from a deadheading.

Deadheading means removing spent or faded flowers regularly.

Many gardeners can get a bit fanatical about this but it can be a time consuming task and often is not necessary.

Here are my guidelines:

  1. If it improves the appearance of the plant, then do it. Plants such as Peony, Daylily and Hosta look instantly better from a deadheading.
  2. Some varieties will be encouraged to produce more flower buds and re bloom as a result of deadheading.
    Daisies, tall Phlox and Salvia usually respond well, where as no amount of deadheading will encourage most spring flowering perennials to re bloom.
  3. The seed heads of some perennials can look attractive well into fall and can be left. Rudbeckia, Heliopsis, Ladies Mantle and Astilbe spring to mind. This can help create a range of interesting texture in the garden.

The general rule is there is no rule, remember they are all perennials and will grow back again next year.

Just do what you have time for and what you think looks best!!

Deadheading means removing spent or faded flowers regularly.

Deadheading means removing spent or faded flowers regularly.

About the Author More by Katie Dawson

Katie Dawson and husband Chris Martin own the Cut and Dried Flower Farm, a family owned greenhouse business located close to Glencairn, Ontario.

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