“Slowly, day by day, it got easier and not as weird”

A yoga teacher discovers the Zen in Zoom.

June 25, 2020 | | Pandemic Journals

Sharon Edmonds set aside her jitters and now teaches her yoga classes using the Zoom app.

Sharon Edmonds set aside her jitters and now teaches her yoga classes using the Zoom app.


I am a registered yoga teacher and have been teaching yoga in Mono and Orangeville for the past three years. I had built my business around my young family, visiting people in their homes and businesses for yoga classes. I was busy every day travelling around our beautiful region doing a job I love.

Covid-19 hit and the lockdowns began just after we arrived in Mont-Tremblant at the end of a 10-hour drive with three kids for our March break. During the long drive home, I was feeling fed up as the reality of the challenges my business was about to face started to sink in.

Yoga is about the connection of the body and mind, and feeling connected to whomever I am teaching is very important to me. It’s why I love teaching in people’s homes. During the drive home, I balked at my husband’s suggestion that I could stream classes online. I am not of the Instagram generation that is happy to do selfies and see myself on camera. I’m the girl who hates hearing or seeing videos of herself. I cringe! But we have always tried to teach our kids that when life gives you lemons, you make lemonade … and I was going to have to suck some lemons.

I contacted a friend and asked her to be my guinea pig. Then, with help from my hubby, IT department and staging co-ordinator, I did my first-ever Zoom yoga class from my home studio in Mono. And yes, teaching poses to a screen was weird. But I adjusted and figured people needed a little yoga now more than ever. So I apprehensively got in touch with all my clients and, apart from one or two who didn’t have a fast enough Internet connection (this is Mono after all), everyone was on board and supportive. Slowly, day by day, it got easier and not as weird.

I began a free weekly Zoom class for my in-laws and a few others I knew were home alone, asking only that they pay it forward. I started similar classes for my mum and my five aunts in Ireland, and now I get to connect with them every week as well. I also ran a mother-daughter Zoom yoga class on Mother’s Day weekend to help others reconnect after being isolated. It has been different, but it has been fun. It’s not something I would like to do forever, but in this current world, it gives a little bit of time to re-centre and just breathe.

About the Author More by Sharon Edmonds

Related Stories

Pandemic Journals

Pandemic Journals

Jun 25, 2020 | Tralee Pearce | Pandemic Journals

We thank everyone who shared a glimpse of their lives with us.

Pandemic Journals

Share Your Journal

May 20, 2020 | In The Hills | Pandemic Journals

Share your story with us using this Pandemic Journals form. Deadline is August 1.

Vanessa Kreuzer and Terry Doel have had to reinvent Orangeville’s Lavender Blue Catering and Le Finis café during the pandemic.

“There was no time to wallow”

Jun 25, 2020 | Vanessa Kreuzer | Pandemic Journals

How the duo behind Orangeville’s Lavender Blue Catering are keeping Dufferin fed.

Grand Valley’s Karla Leger teaches her piano students via video chats.

“The enthusiasm of my students remains”

Jun 25, 2020 | Karla Leger | Pandemic Journals

A piano teacher keeps her music school running on her iPad.

Sharyn Ayliffe spent one day in her new job as general manager of Theatre Orangeville before closing its doors.

“I miss going to work and seeing three-dimensional people”

Jun 25, 2020 | Sharyn Ayliffe | Pandemic Journals

Two weeks into her new job as theatre manager, the curtain dropped and the house went dark.

“I knew I had to say ‘yes!’”

May 20, 2020 | Melissa Cianfarani | Pandemic Journals

How this Bolton emergency childcare provider helps frontline workers do their jobs.

RaDeana Montgomery

“I am now on my third sewing machine”

Jun 23, 2020 | RaDeana Montgomery | Pandemic Journals

How an amateur stitcher found purpose in making masks.

Pepe Lopez travels to Canada each summer from Mexico to work on a Mulmur farm. It feels different this year, he says.

“I always think of my family – my wife, Faviola, and my daughter, Jimena”

Jun 25, 2020 | Pepe Lopez | Pandemic Journals

On a Mulmur farm, an essential seasonal worker misses his Mexican homeland.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

By posting a comment you agree that IN THE HILLS magazine has the legal right to publish, edit or delete all comments for use both online or in print. You also agree that you bear sole legal responsibility for your comments, and that you will hold IN THE HILLS harmless from the legal consequences of your comment, including libel, copyright infringement and any other legal claims. Any comments posted on this site are NOT the opinion of IN THE HILLS magazine. Personal attacks, offensive language and unsubstantiated allegations are not allowed. Please report inappropriate comments to vjones@inthehills.ca.