Local Buys: Winter 2020

What we’re shopping for this winter in Headwaters.

November 24, 2020 | | Made in the Hills

Pottery with personality

Tracey Morse of Pepper Pottery in Grand Valley imbues cheekiness and cheer into her ceramic creations. Her mini houses are incredibly versatile. Small abodes make lovely ring holders or salt dishes, while the large sizes are a decorative way to pot a plant. Her tree ornaments are adorable holiday finds too. (Houses $18–$26, moose ornament $8.50, Pepper Pottery and Holiday Treasures)

Hooked on rugs

These hooked rugs by Erin Tarves are so gorgeous they go on your walls, not underfoot. The Mono artist draws her own designs, some of which feature a touch of whimsy while others showcase classic images, such as the snowman-building session above. She uses wool fabric and yarn to achieve her hallmark rich colours and nubby textures. Rugs, which can take two months to complete, come framed and ready to hang. Available in a range of sizes including 17×14, 19×26 or 28×25 inches. (Rugs $150–$700, Holiday Treasures)

Dream weaver

Orangeville’s Elizabeth Bryan of Weaverbee Textiles brings 30 years’ experience to her handwoven scarves, bags and tea towels. With their rich colours – think layers of deep gold or verdant green – and refined look, you can accessorize (and dry dishes) in style this winter. (Scarves $150–$195, Weaverbee Textiles and Holiday Treasures)

Colour my world

Trina Gray of Shelburne’s My Little Crayon Co. crafts bright, cheerful letters and shapes in a mind-boggling array of colours. Display the alphabet or spell out names and favourite sayings to add a bespoke element to kids’ rooms and nursery decor. Or add a touch of youthfulness to a holiday mantel with Ho Ho Ho. (Letters $2 each, alphabet $40, My Little Crayon Co.)

Sources

About the Author More by Janice Quirt

Janice Quirt is a freelance writer who lives in Orangeville.

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