Sigrid Wolm

Sigrid Wolm may have closed her iconic kitchen store, but she’s far from ready to retire.

September 18, 2020 | | Over the Next Hill

Snapshot: Meet a Community Elder

Martha Stewart was all the rage when Sigrid Wolm first opened the doors of her Kitchen to the Table store in Orangeville 1998.

At the time, naysayers predicted her business selling high-end kitchenware wouldn’t last a year. But in July, when Sigrid closed the store for the final time after 22 years, the store had become an iconic fixture of the local retail scene, and Sigrid a respected and involved member of the business community.

Automatically a member of the town’s BIA when she opened at her first location on Broadway, Sigrid wasn’t content to leave the work to others. Instead she jumped in by joining the board, helping direct the BIA’s activities for the next 10 years.

Along the way she also found time to lend her energy and enthusiasm to the board of Headwaters Tourism.

Sigrid Wolm may have closed her iconic kitchen store, but she’s far from ready to retire. Photo by Rosemary Hasner / Black Dog Creative Arts.

Sigrid Wolm may have closed her iconic kitchen store, but she’s far from ready to retire. Photo by Rosemary Hasner / Black Dog Creative Arts.

Sigrid is a faithful supporter of many local charities, but she identifies most with Theatre Orangeville (because everybody deserves culture), Headwaters Health Care Centre (you never know when you might need its services), and the SPCA (because that’s where her heart is). And as a store owner, she could often be counted on to produce a spectacular gift basket for The Maples Academy.

Born in Germany in 1955, she immigrated to Canada in 1981, worked in Toronto for a number of years, and finally found her home in the Orangeville area in 1986. A very proud Canadian, she has travelled the country extensively – even making a mid-February trip to Baffin Island.

About her retirement from the store, she says, “I’m healthy, full of energy, and have lots more to give. My future may involve working with seniors, or with young people, but I know I will find something to get involved with that will define the next phase of my life.”

Sigrid thrived in retail through hard work and a positive attitude, and she’s not ready to walk into the sunset quite yet.

About the Author More by Gail Grant

Gail Grant is a freelance writer who lives in Palgrave.

Related Stories

Hanging Up My Apron

Sep 18, 2020 | Gail Grant | Over the Next Hill

After turning 70 Gail Grant found cooking a chore. Here’s how meal kits, poached eggs on toast and guilty-pleasure dinners have kept her happily fed.

On her first solo trip, Barbara McKenzie had the pleasure of feeding a koala at the Sydney Zoo in Australia.

Faraway Places are Still Within Reach

Nov 22, 2017 | Gail Grant | Over the Next Hill

Travel helps us see things from a different perspective and lean away from old age.

Aquafit classes at Caledon Centre for Recreation and Wellness help improve strength and balance. Photo by Rosemary Hasner / Black Dog Creative Arts.

Fit for Life

Sep 11, 2015 | Gail Grant | Over the Next Hill

Exercise makes me happy. It energizes me and forges strong links with like-minded people to share challenges, laughter, experiences, wisdom, and even the odd great recipe.

After her husband’s death, Kathryn MacDuffee determined to make the best of the new phase in her life. Hiking expeditions with friends included a trip to the Grand Canyon in 2015. Photo by Rosemary Hasner / Black Dog Creative Arts.

Senior and Single

Mar 19, 2019 | Gail Grant | Over the Next Hill

Living alone doesn’t have to be lonely.

Friends, old and new, are a bulwark against loneliness and loss.

The Importance of Companionship

Sep 16, 2016 | Gail Grant | Over the Next Hill

Friends, old and new, are a bulwark against loneliness and loss.

At Caledon’s bright and airy Abbeyfield House in Caledon East, residents gather for communal meals prepared by the live-in house manager. Photo by Pete Paterson.

Your Next Move

Sep 16, 2017 | Gail Grant | Over the Next Hill

Graduated communities that enable you to stay in your home area as capabilities diminish have obvious advantages.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

By posting a comment you agree that IN THE HILLS magazine has the legal right to publish, edit or delete all comments for use both online or in print. You also agree that you bear sole legal responsibility for your comments, and that you will hold IN THE HILLS harmless from the legal consequences of your comment, including libel, copyright infringement and any other legal claims. Any comments posted on this site are NOT the opinion of IN THE HILLS magazine. Personal attacks, offensive language and unsubstantiated allegations are not allowed. Please report inappropriate comments to vjones@inthehills.ca.