Carib-fusion Rum Cake

At Soulyve, the cake is served with a chocolate-Scotch bonnet sauce and toasted-nutmeg crème Anglaise.

November 17, 2014 | | Back Issues | Desserts | Food | Recipes | Winter 2014

“Around Christmas, this is a tradition in the islands,” Phil says. “Everyone looks forward to their Granny’s rum cake.” There are many different versions using different spices and fruit. But the one thing they all have in common is lots and lots of rum.

The recipe can be doubled if desired. Be sure to beat the eggs for a full 10 minutes until they are very light and frothy. Once the batter is assembled it should be fairly thick – a wooden spoon stuck in the mixture should stand up on its own. Bake the cake for two hours in the middle of a 300°F oven over a broiler pan filled with water on the bottom rack for a moist heat.

At Soulyve, the cake is served with a chocolate-Scotch bonnet sauce and toasted-nutmeg crème Anglaise – Carib-fusion again from a man who has embraced the traditions of his birthplace and used them to enrich his adopted home.

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Up to two weeks ahead, place chopped fruit in an airtight jar. Cover with rum and let stand for at least 24 hours and no more than two weeks. The longer it soaks the more potent your cake will be. Photo by Pete Paterson.

Carib-fusion Rum Cake

Recipe submitted by: Chef Phil Dewar ( Visit Website )

Type

Dessert

Ingredients

  • 1 lb dried fruit (dates, prunes, currants, raisins, dried cherries), chopped
  • 1 cup Appleton dark rum
  • 1 cup Appleton white rum
  • 8 eggs
  • ¾ cup flour
  • ½ tsp each ground cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice
  • ¼ tsp star anise
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • Zest of ½ lime
  • ¾ cup dry bread crumbs
  • ½ lb butter
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • ¼ cup gravy browning sauce
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tsp almond extract

Instructions

  1. Up to two weeks ahead, place chopped fruit in an airtight jar. Cover with rum and let stand for at least 24 hours and no more than two weeks. The longer it soaks the more potent your cake will be.
  2. Preheat oven to 300°F. Fill a broiler pan with water and place on bottom rack of oven. Line an 8-inch round baking tin with parchment paper or grease well with butter.
  3. Process the fruit and rum in a blender or food processor into a coarse purée.
  4. Beat the eggs using a stand mixer or hand mixer until very light and frothy, about 10 minutes. Set aside. In a large bowl, combine flour, ground spices, salt, baking powder, lime zest and bread crumbs. Set aside.
  5. In another bowl, cream butter and sugar until the sugar is dissolved and the texture is light and creamy, about 5 minutes. Add beaten eggs to butter mixture, mixing well.
  6. Then fold in fruit, browning sauce, cream and almond extract, stirring until combined.
  7. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients. Mix well. The batter will be thick.
  8. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake in the middle of the oven for two hours or until a tester comes out clean. Cool completely before serving.
  9. Optional: Pour another ½ cup dark rum over the cake after it has cooled. Allow to soak in. Remove from pan, wrap tightly in plastic wrap and store in an airtight container. The cake can be stored for up to a month or frozen for six months.

About the Author More by Cecily Ross

Former pony clubber and lifelong horse lover, Cecily Ross is a freelance writer who lives in Creemore.

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Rum cake is darker and more dense than its British forebear, and the fruits are puréed to give it a rich, moist texture. Photo by Pete Paterson.

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