Letters – Our Readers Write: Spring 2019

Letters published in the Spring 2019 edition of In The Hills magazine.

March 19, 2019 | | Letters, Our Readers Write

25 Under 25

I just finished reading the winter issue and was most impressed with the coverage of the 25 Under 25 – not only their wonderful stories, but the photographs! Oh my, Pete Paterson did a magnificent job! He has captured the hearts of these great kids and it was a joy to read each one.
Nancy Reynolds, Mono

Congratulations on your winter issue. Proud to read the 25 Under 25 article – Jeff Henrick is our grandson, the McCrearys are family friends, and we’ve learned so much about all the other well-deserved award recipients. The letter on Hurricane Hazel [from Charles Hooker re “Historic Hills: The Lake That Never Was,” autumn’18] was fantastic. My husband, Jim, was one of the scouters who walked the Credit River searching for bodies! We have read the issue from cover to cover, and we will treasure this particular edition. Thank you to all your editors and photographers!
Gloria Porteous, Mono

A leather-bound book contains a record of the Howard family heirlooms and papers, documented and preserved by Alison Hird for her client Robin Ogilvie.

A leather-bound book contains a record of the Howard family heirlooms and papers, documented and preserved by Alison Hird for her client Robin Ogilvie.

 

This recently discovered illuminated document was created by A.H. Howard in 1889 to honour the retirement of Robert Hillyard, manager of the St. Marys branch of the Bank of Montreal. Click for larger image.

This recently discovered illuminated document was created by A.H. Howard in 1889 to honour the retirement of Robert Hillyard, manager of the St. Marys branch of the Bank of Montreal. Click for larger image.

An illuminating story

Since the article “Illuminating the Past” in the winter issue, there has been lots of activity. My client Robin Ogilvie and I have cheered twice at wonderful news!

First, Robin’s leather-bound books arrived, and at Christmas she was able to share them with her family, the story of their artistic great-grandfather Alfred Harold Howard.

Second, a local art collector (who wishes to remain unnamed) shared information about an “A.H.” graphic artwork in his possession. He had been researching a Canadian female artist, and this graphic had been produced for her father. Double fun!

Many thanks to Robin for allowing us to share her story, and to Kira Wronska Dorward for writing it so eloquently!
Alison Hird, Treasured Collections, Caledon

John Wheelwright, 89, paddled 300 kilometres on the Upper Horton River north of the Arctic Circle this past summer. Courtesy Pate Neumann.

John Wheelwright, 89, paddled 300 kilometres on the Upper Horton River north of the Arctic Circle this past summer. Courtesy Pate Neumann.

John Wheelwright

I cannot tell you how much my entire family enjoyed Gail Grant’s article on John Wheelwright – our amazing father and grandfather [“Over the Next Hill: Snapshot” winter’18]. The story certainly captured the essence of him – a family and community man who lives life fully and always gives back.

While my husband and I lived in the United Arab Emirates, my dad and mum, Isabel, made three visits to us. They met many of our friends from all over the world. I thought you might enjoy knowing that In The Hills, while having a local focus, has been read and enjoyed in places far and wide. My father received 90th birthday greetings from Australia, Sweden, the UK, Sri Lanka, the Philippines, Ireland, USA, New Zealand and the UAE – all from friends who enjoyed reading Gail’s story.
Martha Wheelwright Griffin, Prince Edward County

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Two of the many things I love about living in Orangeville – the talented arts community, and the supportive groups and businesses like @inthehillsmag and BookLore, Orangeville’s independent bookstore. Check out the year in books: inthehills.ca.
Liz Jansen, Orangeville

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Disappointed

I’ve been very disappointed in the changes in the cover selections since you decided to go with the mass-market look.

The magazine used to have beautiful local art or photography on the cover. I kept them around just for those inspirational works. For months, not kidding, years, thinking I may paint them. I looked forward to getting the magazine and seeing who you would showcase. The articles and sometimes really terrific writing was a cherry on top.

But now?

Now the covers look just like any other junk mail. It’s all commercial-looking and cold. It’s filled with ads and ads and ads. It looks like any other spam-filled paper stuffed in my mailbox.

Who thought this was a good idea? What happened to the warm, small, arty, inclusive feel of the work?

This is not Toronto. It’s a community of families who choose to live here for the close, artsy feel because Toronto life is not the lifestyle that appeals to us. And this new business model doesn’t reflect us at all. One glance says sterile Toronto wannabe.

We are a community based around the gorgeous land, land that is specifically known for its raw beauty in every season – the magazine is named after it. Put those beautiful things back in the spotlight and go back to standing out. Get the mass-marketing look out of it. It’s not doing you any favours looking like every other ad-filled, money-greedy publication, no matter if it has a local story or not.
Marcia Lalonde, Caledon

 

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