Letters – Our Readers Write: Winter 2019

Letters published in the Winter 2019 edition of In The Hills magazine.

November 22, 2019 | | Letters, Our Readers Write

End of Life Care

Re: “A Final Choice” autumn ’19: My husband was admitted to Headwaters Health Care Centre in early March. Things went downhill rather quickly and he was transferred to the palliative care unit. The staff were incredible, not enough words to explain their compassion, knowledge, bedside care, etc. I had the fortune of meeting Dr. Cathy Candusso while there. What a marvellous person who helped me understand the process, and Bethell House was discussed as a possible placement. My husband did rally for a while (I am sure this is only because of the HHCC staff – doctors, nurses, physio, dieticians, chaplains, and even the cleaning staff); however, he passed peacefully one Monday morning in early July. We live in a wonderful community and are truly blessed to have such superb facilities as HHCC and Bethell Hospice to meet our final needs.
Diane Hull, Erin

Thank you for such a beautifully written and presented article regarding end of life. I’m really happy with the outcome. I have received many comments – you’ve shone a lovely light on Bethell Hospice and everything it does for others.

Thanks so very much for sharing our story, and in such a positive light.
Michele Keeler, Bethell Hospice volunteer, Erin

At Sevenhills Holsteins in Amaranth, dairy cows are milked in an automated 35,000-square-foot barn. Photo by Rosemary Hasner / Black Dog Creative Arts.

At Sevenhills Holsteins in Amaranth, dairy cows are milked in an automated 35,000-square-foot barn. Photo by Rosemary Hasner / Black Dog Creative Arts.

Dufferin Farm Tour

Thank you for that wonderful cover story on the Dufferin Farm Tour [autumn ’19].

Indeed, this year we had a record attendance – over 1,500 people visited five farms in Mono and Amaranth on September 28. And many of the folks told us they had never been before and were excited to come after reading about it in In The Hills.

Some amazing facts about the Dufferin Farm Tour:

This is the 20th year of the tour. Most of the volunteer committee are the original folks who, 20 years ago, thought it would be a good idea for farmers to open their doors to the public to educate people about where their food comes from and to see how farms work up close and personal.

Without those dedicated folks this once a year, free event would never have survived and thrived. They work behind the scenes so that the day is seamless and effortless for the attendees and farmers.

This year we received 3,150 pounds of food and raised $1,133 in donations for our local food banks.

We had over 100 volunteers who made sure visitors enjoyed the day. We also invited added attractions and had over 30 demonstrations, crafts and food vendors.

Thanks to our many sponsors, some of whom have been with us for years, and some wonderful new ones. Without the hard work of our committee, volunteers and our sponsors we could never offer the community this memorable day in Dufferin.
Marci Lipman, Dufferin Farm Tour Committee

Consider animal welfare

I have always enjoyed your magazine for local information and beautiful photography of Caledon and surrounding areas.

However, I was very disappointed with the autumn edition’s cover of a baby calf with big number tags pierced into his or her ears. If you had put a picture of a dog with these tags to be used as a commodity, there would be a public outpour of injustice. Even though they are both sentient beings, we have been conditioned to see them differently.

Let’s face it, times are changing. I am not alone as people become more educated by science that animal agriculture is an environmental disaster. Many people are choosing a plant-based diet for both health and animal welfare reasons.

It used to be smoking on a plane or in a restaurant was acceptable, but that would be very unacceptable today. The same is happening with animal agriculture. The picture on your front page is no longer normal. There is a cultural shift, so please be sensitive to the changes that are happening.
Lorraine Sala-Schultz, Alton

Dry stone waller Eric Landman stands on a private Caledon property where he has completed many walls and structures. Photo by Pete Paterson.

Dry stone waller Eric Landman stands on a private Caledon property where he has completed many walls and structures. Photo by Pete Paterson.

Dry stone wall collaborators

I saw the article Janice Quirt wrote about me and was delighted with it [“Meet the Maker: Eric Landman” autumn ’19]. I wanted to mention a few dry stone wallers who have been instrumental to so many of my projects. John Bland from Montreal designed and help build the wall at the hospital. André Lemieux from Creemore collaborated with me on the Triangle Project in Caledon (pictured in the story). And Sean Donnelly from Kitchener has worked with me on a number of projects, too. I’d also like to thank Whispering Pines Landscaping. If I hadn’t started working with them, I would never have been introduced to the dry stone wall craft.
Eric Landman, Grand Valley

Sharing views

I just finished reading the autumn issue of In The Hills. I love reading it every time it shows up in my mailbox. This edition contained a feature titled “From My Window” by Anthony Jenkins. This was such an enjoyable read – real people, real lives, real points of view. Refreshing and enlightening throughout.
Irene Sanders, East Garafraxa

The Credit, the Humber, the Grand, the Nottawasaga — the four rivers that have their source in our hills are home to a lively community of creatures that forms a complex, interdependent web of life. Click for larger image. Illustration by Anthony Jenkins.

The Credit, the Humber, the Grand, the Nottawasaga — the four rivers that have their source in our hills are home to a lively community of creatures that forms a complex, interdependent web of life. Click for larger image. Illustration by Anthony Jenkins.

River world

Excellent article by Don Scallen [“River World” autumn ’19]. He really captured the dynamic ecology of the Headwaters rivers. And he did a masterful job of connecting the dots to highlight the critical interdependencies that exist between the rivers and their surrounding landscape.
Mike Puddister, Guelph


Congratulations to In The Hills illustrator Shelagh Armstrong who was chosen to be an artist role model in a joint campaign by Barbie and Toys R Us. You’ll see the Barbie Role Model posters and profiles in the toy store chain over the holidays. Shelagh, who illustrates Dan Needles’ and Bethany Lee’s columns for this magazine, graduated from Orangeville Secondary School before attending OCAD University where she now teaches. Shelagh has done illustrations for best-selling books, magazines, advertising and packaging, as well as Canadian stamps and coins.

About the Author More by Our Readers

Related Stories

Cathy Timbers and her husband, Blair Marks, in 2016. This year, after a devastating cancer diagnosis, Blair chose medical assistance in dying. Courtesy Cathy Timbers.

A Final Choice

Sep 16, 2019 | Jeff Rollings | Community

Crucial considerations on life’s final journey.

Dufferin Farm Tour

Sep 16, 2019 | James Matthews | Farming

Dufferin Farm Tour offers a behind-the-scenes peek at agricultural life in the county.

From My Window

Sep 16, 2019 | Anthony Jenkins | Community

Five people share their views as told to Anthony Jenkins.

Dry stone waller Eric Landman stands on a private Caledon property where he has completed many walls and structures. Photo by Pete Paterson.

Meet the Maker: Eric Landman

Sep 16, 2019 | Janice Quirt | Made in the Hills

The ancient craft of dry stone walling is alive and well in Headwaters thanks to this busy local artisan.

River World

Sep 16, 2019 | Don Scallen | Environment

The Credit, the Humber, the Grand and the Nottawasaga rivers are home to a lively community of creatures that form a complex, interdependent web of life.

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