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Heritage

Students outside SS #5, East Luther (Colbeck School) in 1908, the year it was built to replace an earlier wooden schoolhouse. The school served Grades 1 to 8 until 1918 when Grade 9 (Continuation School) was added. Courtesy Dufferin County Museum & Archives , P- 4500.

“Your Christmas concert must be first-rate. Nothing less!”

Nov 17, 2014 | Ken Weber | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue | Winter 2014

During the 1800s, teachers in local one-room schools faced 
a list of expectations and responsibilities so onerous, 
it’s a wonder so many carried on.

By 1915 the demand for telephones in urban centres had mostly been met, so the Bell Telephone Company turned its attention to the countryside.

The Bob Edgar Telephone Company

Sep 11, 2014 | Ken Weber | Autumn 2014 | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue

Beginning in the late 1920s, though, a series of government regulations along with profit-driven business decisions gradually changed telephone service across the country into a fluid network.

The Love Pirate

Jun 17, 2014 | André Babyn | Back Issues

Dufferin County was briefly home to Andrew John Gibson, an Australian who became one of the most well-known con men and bigamists of the 20th century.

From the front page of the Brampton Conservator, August 5, 1914. Illustration credit the Montreal Star. Illustration Courtesy Peel Art Gallery, Museum and Archives.

Our local press on the eve of the Great War

Jun 17, 2014 | Ken Weber | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue | Summer 2014

From the first week of August onward, war news exploded onto the pages of community papers, filling them almost cover to cover.

The On-Again-Off-Again Birth of Peel County

Mar 23, 2014 | Ken Weber | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue | Spring 2014

When the council of the newly independent County of Peel convened in 1867, a first task was to choose a site and a builder for the courthouse and jail.

“There’s Something Under Dufferin County”

Nov 19, 2013 | Ken Weber | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue | Winter 2013

As far back as 1886, for example, gold was discovered in Melancthon Township near Dundalk.

Three generations: James, Thomas and David Jackson standing at the crossroads in France that Thomas helped defend as part of the Normandy assault on the morning of June 6, 1944.

My Grandfather’s War

Sep 11, 2013 | James Jackson | Back Issues

Three generations of a Caledon farming family travelled to 
Europe to retrace the steps of the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion 
during WW II.

Romance bloomed apace at Wynnfield and at the hospital, so much so the place was sometimes called the ‘Perkins Bull Matrimonial Bureau.’ This is the Gairdner-Smith wedding in the garden at Wynnfield.

A Place Like Home

Sep 11, 2013 | Ken Weber | Autumn 2013 | Back Issues

For Canadian boys passing through England during World War I, the Perkins Bull Hospital for Convalescent Canadian Officers offered family warmth and the comfort of “home sweet home,” something all of them desperately needed.

Once Upon a Time There Were House Calls

Sep 11, 2013 | Ken Weber | Autumn 2013 | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue

Before the days of clinics, emergency rooms and office hours, most medical treatment took place in a patient’s home. It was a challenging and uncertain process, and not just for the patient.

A Place for the Deserving Poor

Jun 17, 2013 | Ken Weber | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue | Summer 2013

Males and females, including married couples, slept and ate separately.

Bob Cook

The Great Escaper

Mar 31, 2013 | Ken Weber | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue | Spring 2013

The Orangeville Sun called him Robert the Bold. Local police called him ‘armed and dangerous.’ His neighbours called him ‘misunderstood.’ Bob Cook’s story fits all these descriptions – and then some.

Sir Francis Bond Head, lieutenant-governor of Upper Canada, whose arrogant misreading of the political situation had helped bring about the 1837 uprising, issued a proclamation offering a £1ooo reward for capture of Mackenzie.

How William Lyon Mackenzie Escaped Through Caledon …or Not!

Nov 17, 2012 | Ken Weber | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue | Winter 2012

They were smuggled food by a local farmer’s wife who, knowing she was being watched, would tie packages of food to her crinolines and go for a walk.

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