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Heritage

The Grand River – When Your Neighbour is a River

Jun 20, 2016 | Ken Weber | Historic Hills

Not only does the Grand River lay out nature’s beauty, it also offers opportunities for recreation, commerce and development. Yet all this comes at a cost, for the Grand can be both friend and foe.

Sophie Grégoire-Trudeau wore a cloche in 2015, on the day the newly elected Liberal cabinet was sworn in. Photo by Art Babych / Shutterstock.

A Tip of the Hat to History

Mar 21, 2016 | Ken Weber | Back Issues | Spring 2016

A jaunt through hat fashion history!

Dufferin County Museum and Archives. Photo by Pete Paterson.

All the News That’s Fit to Print

Mar 21, 2016 | Ken Weber | Departments

In the 19th century a weekly newspaper was the primary source of information, commerce, entertainment, argument and gossip for the people of rural Canada. Few papers did the job better than the Orangeville Sun.

Ontario’s indignation was fired by this woodcut, “The Tragedy at Fort Garry, March 4, 1870,” an artist’s conception of the Scott execution at Fort Garry. The anger was made even worse by rumours that Scott was buried alive and was heard screaming in the coffin at his burial. Library and Archives Canada, C-048776

The Red River Rebellion: The Hills Get Indignant!

Nov 25, 2015 | Ken Weber | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue | Winter 2015

There was the button that always cranked these hills beyond reason – the hint of anything Fenian.

D’Alton McCarthy MP (Cons.) 1876–78

Parachuting Candidates into the Safest Seat in the Country

Sep 11, 2015 | Ken Weber | Historic Hills

For almost 40 years after Confederation, the Conservative Party treated the riding of Cardwell – Albion, Caledon, Mono and Adjala townships – like private property. It led to some wild and woolly election campaigns.

Harry Riddell with a blood stock horse, c.1910. Dufferin County Museum & Archives, P-1868

William Henry Riddell: 50,000 Miles in a Sulky

Jun 16, 2015 | Ken Weber | Historic Hills

Henry was born in Caledon Township in 1860 and left just long enough to get a veterinarian degree in Guelph in 1886 before moving to Orangeville to practise.

Seneca Ketchum, 1772–1850. Courtesy St. John's York Mills Anglican Church.

Seneca Ketchum

Mar 23, 2015 | Ken Weber | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue | Spring 2015

Seneca was nearly 60 when he came to Mono, an age when many people look forward to ease and comfort.

Students outside SS #5, East Luther (Colbeck School) in 1908, the year it was built to replace an earlier wooden schoolhouse. The school served Grades 1 to 8 until 1918 when Grade 9 (Continuation School) was added. Courtesy Dufferin County Museum & Archives , P- 4500.

“Your Christmas concert must be first-rate. Nothing less!”

Nov 17, 2014 | Ken Weber | Historic Hills

During the 1800s, teachers in local one-room schools faced 
a list of expectations and responsibilities so onerous, 
it’s a wonder so many carried on.

By 1915 the demand for telephones in urban centres had mostly been met, so the Bell Telephone Company turned its attention to the countryside.

The Bob Edgar Telephone Company

Sep 11, 2014 | Ken Weber | Historic Hills

Beginning in the late 1920s, though, a series of government regulations along with profit-driven business decisions gradually changed telephone service across the country into a fluid network.

Mike Dennett, Andy Scott and Danny Garyfalakis with their Tiger Moth, the culmination of two years of meticulous restoration work. Photo by Pete Paterson.

Flight of the Tiger

Jun 17, 2014 | Tony Reynolds

For three vintage aircraft enthusiasts, slipping “the surly bonds of earth” in their restored Tiger Moth was an unforgettable experience.

The Love Pirate

Jun 17, 2014 | André Babyn | Back Issues

Dufferin County was briefly home to Andrew John Gibson, an Australian who became one of the most well-known con men and bigamists of the 20th century.

From the front page of the Brampton Conservator, August 5, 1914. Illustration credit the Montreal Star. Illustration Courtesy Peel Art Gallery, Museum and Archives.

Our Local Press on the Eve of the Great War

Jun 17, 2014 | Ken Weber

From the first week of August onward, war news exploded onto the pages of community papers, filling them almost cover to cover.

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