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Heritage

The On-Again-Off-Again Birth of Peel County

Mar 23, 2014 | Ken Weber | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue | Spring 2014

When the council of the newly independent County of Peel convened in 1867, a first task was to choose a site and a builder for the courthouse and jail.

“There’s Something Under Dufferin County”

Nov 19, 2013 | Ken Weber | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue | Winter 2013

As far back as 1886, for example, gold was discovered in Melancthon Township near Dundalk.

Three generations: James, Thomas and David Jackson standing at the crossroads in France that Thomas helped defend as part of the Normandy assault on the morning of June 6, 1944.

My Grandfather’s War

Sep 11, 2013 | James Jackson

Three generations of a Caledon farming family travelled to 
Europe to retrace the steps of the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion 
during WW II.

The Homecoming

Sep 11, 2013 | Bernadette Hardaker

To a 13-year-old Orangeville boy in September 1945, news that the father he hadn’t seen in four years was on his way home from the battlefields of Europe was cause for high excitement.

Romance bloomed apace at Wynnfield and at the hospital, so much so the place was sometimes called the ‘Perkins Bull Matrimonial Bureau.’ This is the Gairdner-Smith wedding in the garden at Wynnfield.

A Place Like Home

Sep 11, 2013 | Ken Weber

For Canadian boys passing through England during World War I, the Perkins Bull Hospital for Convalescent Canadian Officers offered family warmth and the comfort of “home sweet home,” something all of them desperately needed.

Once Upon a Time There Were House Calls

Sep 11, 2013 | Ken Weber | Autumn 2013 | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue

Before the days of clinics, emergency rooms and office hours, most medical treatment took place in a patient’s home. It was a challenging and uncertain process, and not just for the patient.

A Place for the Deserving Poor

Jun 17, 2013 | Ken Weber | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue | Summer 2013

Males and females, including married couples, slept and ate separately.

Bob Cook

The Great Escaper

Mar 31, 2013 | Ken Weber | Historic Hills

The Orangeville Sun called him Robert the Bold. Local police called him ‘armed and dangerous.’ His neighbours called him ‘misunderstood.’ Bob Cook’s story fits all these descriptions – and then some.

Sir Francis Bond Head, lieutenant-governor of Upper Canada, whose arrogant misreading of the political situation had helped bring about the 1837 uprising, issued a proclamation offering a £1ooo reward for capture of Mackenzie.

How William Lyon Mackenzie Escaped Through Caledon …or Not!

Nov 17, 2012 | Ken Weber | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue | Winter 2012

They were smuggled food by a local farmer’s wife who, knowing she was being watched, would tie packages of food to her crinolines and go for a walk.

Sir Francis Bond Head, lieutenant-governor of Upper Canada, whose arrogant misreading of the political situation had helped bring about the 1837 uprising, issued a proclamation offering a £1ooo reward for capture of Mackenzie.

The Rebellion of 1837: Not Just Montgomery’s Tavern

Nov 17, 2012 | Ken Weber | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue | Web Extras | Winter 2012

William Lyon Mackenzie’s brief foray in Toronto seems to get all the attention but the fighting in 1837-38 had a far wider base.  Several hundred rebels led by Charles Duncombe were on their way from Brantford to join Mackenzie but dispersed near Hamilton when they learned of the defeat at Montgomery’s Tavern.  Duncombe joined Mackenzie…

Eleanor, her brother Howard, and her Eaton’s Beauty Doll, playing on the first-floor roof at the rear of the hotel, overlooking the barns. Photo Courtesy Eleanor Mcmillan Jamieson.

Memories of Broadway

Sep 13, 2012 | Tony Reynolds | Back Issues

The creamery was where The Banner is now. Every two weeks Mom would send me over to pick up three pounds of butter and a large can of buttermilk.

Dealing with a Nightmare: The 1947 Palgrave Fire

Sep 13, 2012 | Ken Weber | Autumn 2012 | Back Issues | Departments | Historic Hills | In Every Issue

In the days before 
modern firefighting, 
nothing frightened 
a small community 
– or pulled it together 
more powerfully – 
than a major blaze. 
The 1947 Palgrave fire 
was one such case.

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