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Spring 2008

Volume 15 Number 1

Hollyhocks dance in the foreground of a birdhouse designed by Keith, who notes wryly, “Last year’s occupants were bumblebees, I think.” Photo by Pete Paterson.

Bedded Bliss

Mar 23, 2008 | Kate Hawthorne | Back Issues

“Our goal has been to have an interesting garden view out each window of the house and to have water garden sounds from each open window in the summer.”

No Ordinary Swimming Pool, No Ordinary Pond

Mar 23, 2008 | Cecily Ross | Back Issues

One morning last summer, Hockley landscape designer David Warburton arrived at the site of his latest project to find his client, an international businessman with a hectic schedule, sitting alone beside the spectacular new pond that Warburton had recently designed and constructed in the woods behind the client’s weekend home in the Town of Mono.…

Wetland Restoration? Leave it to Beaver

Mar 23, 2008 | Don Scallen | Back Issues | Environment

If beavers are permitted to help reverse wetland losses, frogs will be among the happy beneficiaries.

Sue Meggs, Peter Cole, Barb Terrett and Nancy Urekar (above, foreground) and Sam Nassey (left) brush up on their fiddle techniques at a recent weekend workshop held by Bill Elliott at The Maples near Orangeville. Photo by Tom Partlett.

Fine Fiddling and Flying Footwork

Mar 23, 2008 | Michele Green | Back Issues

Step Dancing In Headwaters Has Two Local Heroes

Yesterday’s Superstore: A Tribute to the Old General Store

Mar 23, 2008 | Ken Weber | Heritage

In the Waldemar store, pop was five cents in the 1940s (seven cents if you took it outside, but there was a two-cent bottle return).

Narrow Gauge Through the Bush

Two Little Railways Made North American History

Mar 23, 2008 | Tony Reynolds | Heritage

The Toronto Grey & Bruce and the Toronto & Nipissing Railways were the first of their kind on the continent.

Field of Schemes

Mar 23, 2008 | Jeff Rollings | Back Issues

There’s a population boom coming to Headwaters. Where will all the people go and what will it mean for our countryside?

Enough of Zoomburb

Mar 23, 2008 | Signe Ball | Back Issues

When I moved to Caledon from Toronto in 1974, feeling all starry-eyed and back-to-the-landish, as befitted the mood of the times, the population of the newly minted “town” was just shy of 20,000. Although already well in transition, the character of the community was still very much a reflection of its historic agricultural roots. Our…

Cinnamon Bun

Letters – Our readers write: Spring 2008

Mar 23, 2008 | In The Hills | Back Issues | Departments | Letters, Our Readers Write

Letters published in the SPRING 2008 edition of In The Hills magazine.

honeybee

Bursting bubbles, boosterisms and commoner sense

Mar 23, 2008 | Douglas G. Pearce | Back Issues | Countryside Digest | Departments | Environment

Boost “Deficit spending is already beyond belief, and the country is hugely indebted, as are households. The housing bubble has already burst. The Federal Reserve has made clear it will reduce interest rates if the economy gets worse, but there, too, are limits. “I’m not an economist, but the only new tool I can think…

Jim Reid ~ Traveller, acrylic on canvas 12o" x 72"

Jim Reid

Mar 23, 2008 | Signe Ball | Back Issues

The painting sites I choose are places I have revisited since childhood, and so they are also saturated with personal memory.

Eastern Meadowlark

Mar 23, 2008 | Linda McLaren | Back Issues | Departments | Environment | Headwaters Sketchbook

Eastern Meadowlarks decline 24% in 20 years.

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In The Hills is an independent, locally owned print and online magazine that has earned its reputation as the best-read, best-loved magazine in Headwaters.

The magazine is delivered to more than 40,000 homes and farms throughout Caledon, Erin, Dufferin, Orangeville and Creemore – up to double the circulation of any other local publication. And it is available to visitors at local inns, restaurants, specialty retail stores and other tourist locations.