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Notes from the Wild

Imperilled Turtles

May 26, 2014 | Don Scallen | Blogs | Environment

May/June is the time that turtles emerge from a long winter’s dormancy to bask in the sun. Unfortunately fewer and fewer of them appear every spring.

Wood Frogs

Apr 22, 2014 | Don Scallen | Blogs | Environment

Usually wood frogs choose ponds that hold water only temporarily – a roll of the dice that can lead to the death or salvation of their progeny.

Cougars

Apr 3, 2014 | Don Scallen

Something strange is going on, and the phenomenon is not confined to the Headwaters.

Snowy Owl Rescue

Mar 5, 2014 | Don Scallen | Blogs | Environment

The winter of 2013-14 has seen a “the largest movement of snowy owls in four or five decades” into southern Canada and the United States.

Snow Buntings

Feb 7, 2014 | Don Scallen

Look for snow buntings every winter, across the windswept fields of Dufferin, Wellington and other open country settings in southern Ontario.

Snowy Owls

Jan 2, 2014 | Don Scallen | Environment

Hungry snowy owls looking for food in the hills.

Groundhogs

Dec 9, 2013 | Don Scallen | Blogs | Environment

Have groundhogs learned the ability to look both ways before crossing?

A Bee or not a Bee? That is the question.

Nov 11, 2013 | Don Scallen | Blogs | Environment

Our understanding of the natural world is often rather muddled. Calling a yellow-jacket a bee is like calling a fox a woodchuck.

Red-backed salamander

Oct 17, 2013 | Don Scallen

Red-backed salamanders are abundant, outnumbering all of the reptiles, rodents and birds that share their forest habitat.

Goldfinches

Sep 18, 2013 | Don Scallen | Environment

Don’t worry about deadheading your perennials after they flower – allow them to go to seed and provide succor to goldfinches and other birds.

Pollinator Friendly Gardens

Aug 28, 2013 | Don Scallen

When I walk into my yard I am greeted by a gloriously diverse menagerie of tiny winged creatures.

Monarch Butterfly – RIP 2026

Aug 9, 2013 | Don Scallen | Blogs | Environment

Most of us are old enough to remember when monarchs were a frequent sight in meadows and gardens.